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Reflections on The Big Society

Reflections on The Big Society & Oxford University Press and Community Development Journal. 2010 All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: [email protected] doi:10.1093/cdj/bsq057 Reflections Reflections on ‘The Big Society’ Matthew Scott One of the features of the UK new government’s policy and politics in 2010 is what Prime Minister David Cameron calls ‘the Big Society’ launched in 16 July (www. cabinetoffice.gov.uk/newsroom/news_releases/2010/100719-bigsociety.aspx). This concept seemingly differentiates it from the earlier Thatcherite individualism, which famously denied the existence of ‘society’, and puts considerable emphasis on the role of civil society, the third sector and social enterprise to step in and succeed where the state has arguably failed. Is this a golden opportunity or a poison chalice for the community sector? Is it a distinctly new initiative or are there lessons to be learned from other international contexts where similar efforts have been tried? In this reflective piece, Matthew Scott, Director of the UK Com- munity Sector Coalition, kicks of a debate which will be continued in future issues of the journal. ‘There is no Big Society Plan, and no one is in charge.’ David Wilcox – Social Reporter for the Big Society Network (26 August 2010) Shortly before he left the Big Society Network, David Wilcox http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Community Development Journal Oxford University Press

Reflections on The Big Society

Community Development Journal , Volume 46 (1) – Jan 1, 2011

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References (6)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Oxford University Press and Community Development Journal. 2010 All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissionsoup.com
Subject
Reflections
ISSN
0010-3802
eISSN
1468-2656
DOI
10.1093/cdj/bsq057
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

& Oxford University Press and Community Development Journal. 2010 All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: [email protected] doi:10.1093/cdj/bsq057 Reflections Reflections on ‘The Big Society’ Matthew Scott One of the features of the UK new government’s policy and politics in 2010 is what Prime Minister David Cameron calls ‘the Big Society’ launched in 16 July (www. cabinetoffice.gov.uk/newsroom/news_releases/2010/100719-bigsociety.aspx). This concept seemingly differentiates it from the earlier Thatcherite individualism, which famously denied the existence of ‘society’, and puts considerable emphasis on the role of civil society, the third sector and social enterprise to step in and succeed where the state has arguably failed. Is this a golden opportunity or a poison chalice for the community sector? Is it a distinctly new initiative or are there lessons to be learned from other international contexts where similar efforts have been tried? In this reflective piece, Matthew Scott, Director of the UK Com- munity Sector Coalition, kicks of a debate which will be continued in future issues of the journal. ‘There is no Big Society Plan, and no one is in charge.’ David Wilcox – Social Reporter for the Big Society Network (26 August 2010) Shortly before he left the Big Society Network, David Wilcox

Journal

Community Development JournalOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2011

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