RAPID COMMUNICATION: Dietary tributyrin supplementation and submaximal exercise promote activation of equine satellite cells

RAPID COMMUNICATION: Dietary tributyrin supplementation and submaximal exercise promote... Abstract Post-exercise skeletal muscle repair is dependent upon the actions of satellite cells (SCs). The signal(s) responsible for activation of these normally quiescent cells in the horse remain unknown. The objective of the experiment was to determine if submaximal exercise or tributyrin (TB) supplementation are sufficient to stimulate SC activation. Adult geldings were fed a control diet (n=6) or a diet containing 0.45% TB (n=6). After 30 d, the geldings performed a single bout of submaximal exercise. Middle gluteal muscle biopsies and blood were collected on d -1, 1 , 3 and 5 relative to exercise. Diet had no effect on any parameter of physical performance. Total RNA isolated from the gluteal muscle of TB fed geldings contained greater (P < 0.05) amounts of myogenin mRNA than controls. Satellite cell isolates from TB supplemented horses had a greater (P = 0.02) percentage of proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunopositive (PCNA+) SC than controls after 48 h in culture. Submaximal exercise was sufficient to increase (P < 0.05) the percentage of PCNA(+) cells in all isolates obtained during recovery period. No change in the amount of gluteal muscle Pax7 mRNA, a lineage marker of satellite cells, occurred in response to either diet or exercise. Our results indicate that both submaximal exercise and TB prime SCs for activation and cell cycle reentry but are insufficient to cause an increase in Pax7 expression during the recovery period. This content is only available as a PDF. © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society of Animal Science. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Animal Science Oxford University Press

RAPID COMMUNICATION: Dietary tributyrin supplementation and submaximal exercise promote activation of equine satellite cells

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Copyright
© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society of Animal Science. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
0021-8812
eISSN
1525-3163
DOI
10.1093/jas/skz330
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Post-exercise skeletal muscle repair is dependent upon the actions of satellite cells (SCs). The signal(s) responsible for activation of these normally quiescent cells in the horse remain unknown. The objective of the experiment was to determine if submaximal exercise or tributyrin (TB) supplementation are sufficient to stimulate SC activation. Adult geldings were fed a control diet (n=6) or a diet containing 0.45% TB (n=6). After 30 d, the geldings performed a single bout of submaximal exercise. Middle gluteal muscle biopsies and blood were collected on d -1, 1 , 3 and 5 relative to exercise. Diet had no effect on any parameter of physical performance. Total RNA isolated from the gluteal muscle of TB fed geldings contained greater (P < 0.05) amounts of myogenin mRNA than controls. Satellite cell isolates from TB supplemented horses had a greater (P = 0.02) percentage of proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunopositive (PCNA+) SC than controls after 48 h in culture. Submaximal exercise was sufficient to increase (P < 0.05) the percentage of PCNA(+) cells in all isolates obtained during recovery period. No change in the amount of gluteal muscle Pax7 mRNA, a lineage marker of satellite cells, occurred in response to either diet or exercise. Our results indicate that both submaximal exercise and TB prime SCs for activation and cell cycle reentry but are insufficient to cause an increase in Pax7 expression during the recovery period. This content is only available as a PDF. © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society of Animal Science. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Journal

Journal of Animal ScienceOxford University Press

Published: Apr 11, 26

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