Psychological health and well-being: why and how should public health specialists measure it? Part 2: stress, subjective well-being and overall conclusions

Psychological health and well-being: why and how should public health specialists measure it?... Background There are cogent reasons why public health specialists should take an active interest in and measure the psychological health and well-being of populations. These are discussed in Part 1 of this study, where methods of measurement from the field of ‘Psychiatric Epidemiology’ are evaluated. This paper continues the review of methods by which psychological health and well-being might be measured by public health specialists. Methods The methods of the literature search and review are described in Part 1. In Part 2, approaches from the fields of ‘Stress’ and ‘Subjective Well-being’ are examined and evaluated. Results Many stress questionnaires, such as those that relate to ‘life events’, ‘hassles’ and ‘perceived stress’ pose conceptual problems and do not seem to have any advantages over a simple psychiatric symptom questionnaire, such as the General Health Questionnaire or HAD Scale. The Short Form 36 (SF-36) is a well-being or health outcome instrument. Its mental health and vitality scales encompass both positive and negative psychological well-being. The instrument also contains scales for aspects of physical well-being, which make it attractive for public health use. However, it was found that the positive aspect of these scales has not been validated to the same extent as the negative aspect. Conclusions Some of the methods reviewed in Parts 1 and 2 of this study can and have been used, with certain provisos, in public health research and practice. However, a truly valid measure of both positive and negative psychological well-being has not yet been devised. Key words psychiatric epidemiology stress subjective well-being survey instruments © Oxford University Press « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article J Public Health (1998) 20 (3): 288-294. » Abstract Free Full Text (PDF) Free Classifications Article Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Disclaimer Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Bartlett, C. J. Articles by Coles, E. C. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Bartlett, C. J. Articles by Coles, E. C. Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google+ Mendeley Twitter What's this? Search this journal: Advanced » Current Issue December 2015 37 (4) Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Publishers' Books for Review Rights & Permissions Dispatch date of the next issue We are mobile – find out more Journals Career Network Published on behalf of The Faculty of Public Health of the Royal Colleges of Physicians of the United Kingdom Impact factor: 2.039 5-Yr impact factor: 2.456 Editors Professor Eugene Milne and Professor Ted Schrecker View full editorial board For Authors Instructions to authors Online submission Self-Archiving Policy Open Access options for authors - visit Oxford Open This journal enables compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy Alerting Services Email table of contents Email Advance Access CiteTrack XML RSS feed Corporate Services Advertising sales Reprints Supplements var taxonomies = ("MED00860"); Most Most Read Mode of questionnaire administration can have serious effects on data quality 'Scoping the scope' of a cochrane review The South African national health insurance: a revolution in health-care delivery! Population dynamics and climate change: what are the links? Reflection as part of continuous professional development for public health professionals: a literature review » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Which deprivation? A comparison of selected deprivation indexes Mortality from all causes and circulatory disease by country of birth in England and Wales 2001-2003 Mode of questionnaire administration can have serious effects on data quality Systematic review of discharge coding accuracy The measurement of patient satisfaction » View all Most Cited articles Disclaimer: Please note that abstracts for content published before 1996 were created through digital scanning and may therefore not exactly replicate the text of the original print issues. All efforts have been made to ensure accuracy, but the Publisher will not be held responsible for any remaining inaccuracies. If you require any further clarification, please contact our Customer Services Department. Online ISSN 1741-3850 - Print ISSN 1741-3842 Copyright © 2015 Faculty of Public Health Oxford Journals Oxford University Press Site Map Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Legal Notices Frequently Asked Questions Other Oxford University Press sites: Oxford University Press Oxford Journals China Oxford Journals Japan Academic & Professional books Children's & Schools Books Dictionaries & Reference Dictionary of National Biography Digital Reference English Language Teaching Higher Education Textbooks International Education Unit Law Medicine Music Online Products & Publishing Oxford Bibliographies Online Oxford Dictionaries Online Oxford English Dictionary Oxford Language Dictionaries Online Oxford Scholarship Online Reference Rights and Permissions Resources for Retailers & Wholesalers Resources for the Healthcare Industry Very Short Introductions World's Classics function fnc_onDomLoaded() { var query_context = getQueryContext(); PF_initOIUnderbar(query_context,":QS:default","","JRN"); PF_insertOIUnderbar(0); }; if (window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', fnc_onDomLoaded, false); } else if (window.attachEvent) { window.attachEvent('onload', fnc_onDomLoaded); } var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? 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Psychological health and well-being: why and how should public health specialists measure it? Part 2: stress, subjective well-being and overall conclusions

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Faculty of Public Health
ISSN
1741-3842
eISSN
1741-3850
DOI
jpubhealth;20/3/288
Publisher site
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Abstract

Background There are cogent reasons why public health specialists should take an active interest in and measure the psychological health and well-being of populations. These are discussed in Part 1 of this study, where methods of measurement from the field of ‘Psychiatric Epidemiology’ are evaluated. This paper continues the review of methods by which psychological health and well-being might be measured by public health specialists. Methods The methods of the literature search and review are described in Part 1. In Part 2, approaches from the fields of ‘Stress’ and ‘Subjective Well-being’ are examined and evaluated. Results Many stress questionnaires, such as those that relate to ‘life events’, ‘hassles’ and ‘perceived stress’ pose conceptual problems and do not seem to have any advantages over a simple psychiatric symptom questionnaire, such as the General Health Questionnaire or HAD Scale. The Short Form 36 (SF-36) is a well-being or health outcome instrument. Its mental health and vitality scales encompass both positive and negative psychological well-being. The instrument also contains scales for aspects of physical well-being, which make it attractive for public health use. However, it was found that the positive aspect of these scales has not been validated to the same extent as the negative aspect. Conclusions Some of the methods reviewed in Parts 1 and 2 of this study can and have been used, with certain provisos, in public health research and practice. However, a truly valid measure of both positive and negative psychological well-being has not yet been devised. Key words psychiatric epidemiology stress subjective well-being survey instruments © Oxford University Press « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article J Public Health (1998) 20 (3): 288-294. » Abstract Free Full Text (PDF) Free Classifications Article Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Disclaimer Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Bartlett, C. J. Articles by Coles, E. C. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Bartlett, C. J. Articles by Coles, E. C. Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google+ Mendeley Twitter What's this? Search this journal: Advanced » Current Issue December 2015 37 (4) Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Publishers' Books for Review Rights & Permissions Dispatch date of the next issue We are mobile – find out more Journals Career Network Published on behalf of The Faculty of Public Health of the Royal Colleges of Physicians of the United Kingdom Impact factor: 2.039 5-Yr impact factor: 2.456 Editors Professor Eugene Milne and Professor Ted Schrecker View full editorial board For Authors Instructions to authors Online submission Self-Archiving Policy Open Access options for authors - visit Oxford Open This journal enables compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy Alerting Services Email table of contents Email Advance Access CiteTrack XML RSS feed Corporate Services Advertising sales Reprints Supplements var taxonomies = ("MED00860"); Most Most Read Mode of questionnaire administration can have serious effects on data quality 'Scoping the scope' of a cochrane review The South African national health insurance: a revolution in health-care delivery! Population dynamics and climate change: what are the links? Reflection as part of continuous professional development for public health professionals: a literature review » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Which deprivation? A comparison of selected deprivation indexes Mortality from all causes and circulatory disease by country of birth in England and Wales 2001-2003 Mode of questionnaire administration can have serious effects on data quality Systematic review of discharge coding accuracy The measurement of patient satisfaction » View all Most Cited articles Disclaimer: Please note that abstracts for content published before 1996 were created through digital scanning and may therefore not exactly replicate the text of the original print issues. All efforts have been made to ensure accuracy, but the Publisher will not be held responsible for any remaining inaccuracies. If you require any further clarification, please contact our Customer Services Department. Online ISSN 1741-3850 - Print ISSN 1741-3842 Copyright © 2015 Faculty of Public Health Oxford Journals Oxford University Press Site Map Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Legal Notices Frequently Asked Questions Other Oxford University Press sites: Oxford University Press Oxford Journals China Oxford Journals Japan Academic & Professional books Children's & Schools Books Dictionaries & Reference Dictionary of National Biography Digital Reference English Language Teaching Higher Education Textbooks International Education Unit Law Medicine Music Online Products & Publishing Oxford Bibliographies Online Oxford Dictionaries Online Oxford English Dictionary Oxford Language Dictionaries Online Oxford Scholarship Online Reference Rights and Permissions Resources for Retailers & Wholesalers Resources for the Healthcare Industry Very Short Introductions World's Classics function fnc_onDomLoaded() { var query_context = getQueryContext(); PF_initOIUnderbar(query_context,":QS:default","","JRN"); PF_insertOIUnderbar(0); }; if (window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', fnc_onDomLoaded, false); } else if (window.attachEvent) { window.attachEvent('onload', fnc_onDomLoaded); } var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); try { var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-189672-16"); pageTracker._setDomainName(".oxfordjournals.org"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); } catch(err) {}

Journal

Journal of Public HealthOxford University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1998

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