Police Complaints and the Complainants’ Experience

Police Complaints and the Complainants’ Experience AbstractThe current paper presents an analysis of the police complaints process, and includes results of empirical research conducted on behalf of the police between 1996 and 1997. The discussion centres on the position and experiences of police complainants, and the extent to which complainants are satisfied with the quality of service provided during, and the independence of, complaints investigations. The research findings suggest that a substantial proportion of complainants remain dissatisfied with key aspects of the police complaints process, including the length of time taken to resolve a complaint, the extent to which they are kept informed about their case, and the perceived independence (or otherwise) of investigation. Such findings seem to parallel those of other studies (such as Brown 1998, and Maguire and Corbett 1991). The Home Affairs Committee (1998) highlighted shortcomings in the police complaints and procedures. These changes are also discussed in the current analysis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The British Journal of Criminology Oxford University Press

Police Complaints and the Complainants’ Experience

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/police-complaints-and-the-complainants-experience-rCrgWMzhVM
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Oxford University Press
ISSN
0007-0955
eISSN
1464-3529
DOI
10.1093/bjc/40.4.617
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe current paper presents an analysis of the police complaints process, and includes results of empirical research conducted on behalf of the police between 1996 and 1997. The discussion centres on the position and experiences of police complainants, and the extent to which complainants are satisfied with the quality of service provided during, and the independence of, complaints investigations. The research findings suggest that a substantial proportion of complainants remain dissatisfied with key aspects of the police complaints process, including the length of time taken to resolve a complaint, the extent to which they are kept informed about their case, and the perceived independence (or otherwise) of investigation. Such findings seem to parallel those of other studies (such as Brown 1998, and Maguire and Corbett 1991). The Home Affairs Committee (1998) highlighted shortcomings in the police complaints and procedures. These changes are also discussed in the current analysis.

Journal

The British Journal of CriminologyOxford University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month