Physical Therapy Education and the Labor Market in Brazil: Advances and Challenges

Physical Therapy Education and the Labor Market in Brazil: Advances and Challenges Abstract Background In Brazil, the number of physical therapy (PT) education programs and, consequently, of professionals, has been growing for the past 20 years. Objectives The objective of the study was to describe the evolution and distribution of physical therapy education programs in Brazil and to analyze the impact of workforce growth on the labor market for these professionals. Design This was a descriptive, exploratory, quantitative study. Methods Secondary data collected from official sources in Brazil were used. Results The first physical therapy education program was created in 1958, and after significant growth, 536 programs were active in 2014. The historical series (1996–2014) shows a corresponding increase in the number of admissions by higher educational institutions. This expansion resulted in an increase in the number of professionals, with an impact on the labor market. The workforce in physical therapy is predominantly female, and women increased their participation in this labor market from 59% in 1996 to 81% in 2014. An increase in nominal monthly salaries was observed over the years – from US$797.00 in 1996 to US $1,056.00 in 2014. Nevertheless, the real average salaries, ie, salaries adjusted to inflation, have followed a trend of devaluation. Limitations Results of this study must be interpreted in terms of overall trends rather than as precise absolute numbers due to the inherent nature of the varied secondary data sources. Conclusions These data can support further discussion on training and the labor market in the field of physical therapy. Notes Accepted: October 20, 2018 Submitted: December 11, 2017 © 2019 American Physical Therapy Association This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Therapy Oxford University Press

Physical Therapy Education and the Labor Market in Brazil: Advances and Challenges

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2019 American Physical Therapy Association
ISSN
0031-9023
eISSN
1538-6724
D.O.I.
10.1093/ptj/pzz055
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Background In Brazil, the number of physical therapy (PT) education programs and, consequently, of professionals, has been growing for the past 20 years. Objectives The objective of the study was to describe the evolution and distribution of physical therapy education programs in Brazil and to analyze the impact of workforce growth on the labor market for these professionals. Design This was a descriptive, exploratory, quantitative study. Methods Secondary data collected from official sources in Brazil were used. Results The first physical therapy education program was created in 1958, and after significant growth, 536 programs were active in 2014. The historical series (1996–2014) shows a corresponding increase in the number of admissions by higher educational institutions. This expansion resulted in an increase in the number of professionals, with an impact on the labor market. The workforce in physical therapy is predominantly female, and women increased their participation in this labor market from 59% in 1996 to 81% in 2014. An increase in nominal monthly salaries was observed over the years – from US$797.00 in 1996 to US $1,056.00 in 2014. Nevertheless, the real average salaries, ie, salaries adjusted to inflation, have followed a trend of devaluation. Limitations Results of this study must be interpreted in terms of overall trends rather than as precise absolute numbers due to the inherent nature of the varied secondary data sources. Conclusions These data can support further discussion on training and the labor market in the field of physical therapy. Notes Accepted: October 20, 2018 Submitted: December 11, 2017 © 2019 American Physical Therapy Association This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Journal

Physical TherapyOxford University Press

Published: Apr 2, 2019

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