Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

P. T. Barnum Presents Jenny Lind: The American Tour of the Swedish Nightingale. By W. Porter Ware and Thaddeus C. Lockard, Jr. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1980. xiv + 204 pp. Illustrations, tables, appendixes, notes, bibliography, and index. $20.00.)

P. T. Barnum Presents Jenny Lind: The American Tour of the Swedish Nightingale. By W. Porter Ware... Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jah/article/68/1/134/763055 by DeepDyve user on 16 September 2020 134 The Journal of American History where the diagnosis shifted, the remedy, more liberty, always remained the same. Schleifer deserves a full measure of recognition for having followed an elusive and complex thinker through the internal problems of creating a masterwork. Other insights into the making of the Democracy await scholars willing to stand a little further back. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH SEYMOUR DP.ESCHER P. T. Barnum Presents Jenny Lind: The American Tour of the Swedish Nightingale. By W. Porter Ware and Thaddeus C. Lockard, Jr. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1980. xiv + 204 pp. Illustrations, tables, appendixes, notes, bibliography, and index. $20.00.) In chronicling Jenny Lind's 1850-1851 visit to America, W. Porter Ware and Thaddeus C. Lockard, Jr., have performed a highly valuable service for all historians of American culture. For scholars and general readers alike their book details the concert tour that the Swedish Nightingale made, like a royal progress, from one end of this country to the other under P. T. Barnum's shrewd financial management. North, South, East, and West--wherever the period's most widely acclaimed Queen of Song journeyed and wherever she sang, crowds turned out to cheer her--one is tempted to say worship at her feet--to listen enraptured as her glorious coloratura brought them elegance of sound and musicianship that few people on this side of the Atlantic had ever imagined. Though keeping Lind always at stage center in these pages, Ware and Lockard tell us much about Barnum as an impresario and, more importantly, much about the tempestuous American people and the new country they were frenziedly hacking out of the wilderness. Traveling with Lind by every possible means of conveyance--wagons, trains, steamboats, stagecoaches--through muddy villages as well as New York, Philadelphia, New Orleans, St. Louis, Washington, Boston, we observe Barnum's cunning in playing on a crowd's curiosity, his skill in manipulating stampedes to the box office. Barnum reaped every possible profit from Lind's long tour. But not matter how costly the tickets, Lind's charm, her warmth, and her high regard for her audiences as human beings celebrating with her the blessings of music always seemed to justify the high prices. And for every happy customer who managed to get to the box office before the tickets were gone, hundreds less lucky in town after town hovered outside the place of the program [be it concert hall, warehouse, church sanctuary, or school) straining to hear the music. Sometimes they created riots when police tried to disperse them or town drunks outside tried to produce sideshows of their own. When Lind's visit ended in June 1851, she was richer by at least $176,000; Barnum, by at least $200,000. And city dwellers and backwoodsmen alike were left with memories they would invest in efforts to create a permanent American context for the fine arts. Now fully reported for the first time, Jenny Lind's tour stands as a big chapter in the long story of America's push for cultural maturity. UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS, EL PASO JOSEPH LEACH http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of American History Oxford University Press

P. T. Barnum Presents Jenny Lind: The American Tour of the Swedish Nightingale. By W. Porter Ware and Thaddeus C. Lockard, Jr. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1980. xiv + 204 pp. Illustrations, tables, appendixes, notes, bibliography, and index. $20.00.)

The Journal of American History , Volume 68 (1) – Jun 1, 1981

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/p-t-barnum-presents-jenny-lind-the-american-tour-of-the-swedish-SyIha0QB04

References (0)

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Oxford University Press
ISSN
0021-8723
eISSN
1945-2314
DOI
10.2307/1890944
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jah/article/68/1/134/763055 by DeepDyve user on 16 September 2020 134 The Journal of American History where the diagnosis shifted, the remedy, more liberty, always remained the same. Schleifer deserves a full measure of recognition for having followed an elusive and complex thinker through the internal problems of creating a masterwork. Other insights into the making of the Democracy await scholars willing to stand a little further back. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH SEYMOUR DP.ESCHER P. T. Barnum Presents Jenny Lind: The American Tour of the Swedish Nightingale. By W. Porter Ware and Thaddeus C. Lockard, Jr. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1980. xiv + 204 pp. Illustrations, tables, appendixes, notes, bibliography, and index. $20.00.) In chronicling Jenny Lind's 1850-1851 visit to America, W. Porter Ware and Thaddeus C. Lockard, Jr., have performed a highly valuable service for all historians of American culture. For scholars and general readers alike their book details the concert tour that the Swedish Nightingale made, like a royal progress, from one end of this country to the other under P. T. Barnum's shrewd financial management. North, South, East, and West--wherever the period's most widely acclaimed Queen of Song journeyed and wherever she sang, crowds turned out to cheer her--one is tempted to say worship at her feet--to listen enraptured as her glorious coloratura brought them elegance of sound and musicianship that few people on this side of the Atlantic had ever imagined. Though keeping Lind always at stage center in these pages, Ware and Lockard tell us much about Barnum as an impresario and, more importantly, much about the tempestuous American people and the new country they were frenziedly hacking out of the wilderness. Traveling with Lind by every possible means of conveyance--wagons, trains, steamboats, stagecoaches--through muddy villages as well as New York, Philadelphia, New Orleans, St. Louis, Washington, Boston, we observe Barnum's cunning in playing on a crowd's curiosity, his skill in manipulating stampedes to the box office. Barnum reaped every possible profit from Lind's long tour. But not matter how costly the tickets, Lind's charm, her warmth, and her high regard for her audiences as human beings celebrating with her the blessings of music always seemed to justify the high prices. And for every happy customer who managed to get to the box office before the tickets were gone, hundreds less lucky in town after town hovered outside the place of the program [be it concert hall, warehouse, church sanctuary, or school) straining to hear the music. Sometimes they created riots when police tried to disperse them or town drunks outside tried to produce sideshows of their own. When Lind's visit ended in June 1851, she was richer by at least $176,000; Barnum, by at least $200,000. And city dwellers and backwoodsmen alike were left with memories they would invest in efforts to create a permanent American context for the fine arts. Now fully reported for the first time, Jenny Lind's tour stands as a big chapter in the long story of America's push for cultural maturity. UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS, EL PASO JOSEPH LEACH

Journal

The Journal of American HistoryOxford University Press

Published: Jun 1, 1981

There are no references for this article.