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Measuring the Involvement Construct

Measuring the Involvement Construct Abstract A bipolar adjective scale, the Personal Involvement Inventory (PII), was developed to capture the concept of involvement for products. The scale successfully met standards for internal reliability, reliability over time, content validity, criterion-related validity, and construct validity. Tests of construct validity demonstrated that the scores were positively related to perceived differences among brands, brand preferences, interest in gathering information about the product category, and comparison of product attributes among brands. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes * This article was a finalist in the 1984 Robert Ferber Award for Consumer Research competition for the best interdisciplinary article based on a recent doctoral dissertation. The award is cosponsored by the Association for Consumer Research and the Journal of Consumer Research. ** Judith Lynne Zaichkowsky is Assistant Professor of Marketing, Faculty of Business Administration, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, B.C., Canada V5A 1S6. The author wishes to thank Hal Kassarjian, who chaired the dissertation on which this article is based at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Canada Council for financial support. A special thanks goes to The American University and Nanette Brown for help in word processing the manuscript. © JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Consumer Research Oxford University Press

Measuring the Involvement Construct

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References (29)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH
ISSN
0093-5301
eISSN
1537-5277
DOI
10.1086/208520
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract A bipolar adjective scale, the Personal Involvement Inventory (PII), was developed to capture the concept of involvement for products. The scale successfully met standards for internal reliability, reliability over time, content validity, criterion-related validity, and construct validity. Tests of construct validity demonstrated that the scores were positively related to perceived differences among brands, brand preferences, interest in gathering information about the product category, and comparison of product attributes among brands. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes * This article was a finalist in the 1984 Robert Ferber Award for Consumer Research competition for the best interdisciplinary article based on a recent doctoral dissertation. The award is cosponsored by the Association for Consumer Research and the Journal of Consumer Research. ** Judith Lynne Zaichkowsky is Assistant Professor of Marketing, Faculty of Business Administration, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, B.C., Canada V5A 1S6. The author wishes to thank Hal Kassarjian, who chaired the dissertation on which this article is based at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Canada Council for financial support. A special thanks goes to The American University and Nanette Brown for help in word processing the manuscript. © JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH

Journal

Journal of Consumer ResearchOxford University Press

Published: Dec 1, 1985

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