Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Long-Term Treatment with Recombinant Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF)-I in Children with Severe IGF-I Deficiency due to Growth Hormone Insensitivity

Long-Term Treatment with Recombinant Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF)-I in Children with Severe... AbstractContext: Children with severe IGF-I deficiency due to congenital or acquired defects in GH action have short stature that cannot be remedied by GH treatment.Objectives: The objective of the study was to examine the long-term efficacy and safety of recombinant human IGF-I (rhIGF-I) therapy for short children with severe IGF-I deficiency.Design: Seventy-six children with IGF-I deficiency due to GH insensitivity were treated with rhIGF-I for up to 12 yr under a predominantly open-label design.Setting: The study was conducted at general clinical research centers and with collaborating endocrinologists.Subjects: Entry criteria included: age older than 2 yr, sd scores for height and circulating IGF-I concentration less than −2 for age and sex, and evidence of resistance to GH.Intervention: rhIGF-I was administered sc in doses between 60 and 120 μg/kg twice daily.Main Outcome Measures: Height velocity, skeletal maturation, and adverse events were measured.Results: Height velocity increased from 2.8 cm/yr on average at baseline to 8.0 cm/yr during the first year of treatment (P < 0.0001) and was dependent on the dose administered. Height velocities were lower during subsequent years but remained above baseline for up to 8 yr. The most common adverse event was hypoglycemia, which was observed both before and during therapy. It was reported by 49% of treated subjects. The next most common adverse events were injection site lipohypertrophy (32%) and tonsillar/adenoidal hypertrophy (22%).Conclusions: Treatment with rhIGF-I stimulates linear growth in children with severe IGF-I deficiency due to GH insensitivity. Adverse events are common but are rarely of sufficient severity to interrupt or modify treatment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Oxford University Press

Long-Term Treatment with Recombinant Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF)-I in Children with Severe IGF-I Deficiency due to Growth Hormone Insensitivity

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/long-term-treatment-with-recombinant-insulin-like-growth-factor-igf-i-B8upvOaTDf

References (31)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by The Endocrine Society
ISSN
0021-972X
eISSN
1945-7197
DOI
10.1210/jc.2006-1610
pmid
17192294
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractContext: Children with severe IGF-I deficiency due to congenital or acquired defects in GH action have short stature that cannot be remedied by GH treatment.Objectives: The objective of the study was to examine the long-term efficacy and safety of recombinant human IGF-I (rhIGF-I) therapy for short children with severe IGF-I deficiency.Design: Seventy-six children with IGF-I deficiency due to GH insensitivity were treated with rhIGF-I for up to 12 yr under a predominantly open-label design.Setting: The study was conducted at general clinical research centers and with collaborating endocrinologists.Subjects: Entry criteria included: age older than 2 yr, sd scores for height and circulating IGF-I concentration less than −2 for age and sex, and evidence of resistance to GH.Intervention: rhIGF-I was administered sc in doses between 60 and 120 μg/kg twice daily.Main Outcome Measures: Height velocity, skeletal maturation, and adverse events were measured.Results: Height velocity increased from 2.8 cm/yr on average at baseline to 8.0 cm/yr during the first year of treatment (P < 0.0001) and was dependent on the dose administered. Height velocities were lower during subsequent years but remained above baseline for up to 8 yr. The most common adverse event was hypoglycemia, which was observed both before and during therapy. It was reported by 49% of treated subjects. The next most common adverse events were injection site lipohypertrophy (32%) and tonsillar/adenoidal hypertrophy (22%).Conclusions: Treatment with rhIGF-I stimulates linear growth in children with severe IGF-I deficiency due to GH insensitivity. Adverse events are common but are rarely of sufficient severity to interrupt or modify treatment.

Journal

Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and MetabolismOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2007

There are no references for this article.