Lidar Remote Sensing for Ecosystem Studies

Lidar Remote Sensing for Ecosystem Studies Articles Lidar Remote Sensing for Ecosystem Studies MICHAEL A. LEFSKY, WARREN B. COHEN, GEOFFREY G. PARKER, AND DAVID J. HARDING emote sensing has facilitated extraordinary LIDAR, AN EMERGING REMOTE SENSING Radvances in the modeling, mapping, and understanding of ecosystems. Typical applications of remote sensing involve TECHNOLOGY THAT DIRECTLY MEASURES either images from passive optical systems, such as aerial photography and Landsat Thematic Mapper (Goward and THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL DISTRIBUTION Williams 1997), or to a lesser degree, active radar sensors such as RADARSAT (Waring et al. 1995). These types of sen- OF PLANT CANOPIES, CAN ACCURATELY sors have proven to be satisfactory for many ecological ap- ESTIMATE VEGETATION STRUCTURAL plications, such as mapping land cover into broad classes and, in some biomes, estimating aboveground biomass and ATTRIBUTES AND SHOULD BE OF leaf area index (LAI). Moreover, they enable researchers to an- alyze the spatial pattern of these images. PARTICULAR INTEREST TO FOREST, LAND- However, conventional sensors have significant limitations for ecological applications. The sensitivity and accuracy of SCAPE, AND GLOBAL ECOLOGISTS these devices have repeatedly been shown to fall with in- creasing aboveground biomass and leaf area index (Waring et al. 1995, Carlson and Ripley 1997, Turner et al. 1999). They http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BioScience Oxford University Press

Lidar Remote Sensing for Ecosystem Studies

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/lidar-remote-sensing-for-ecosystem-studies-Z8ir2TkFey
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2002 American Institute of Biological Sciences
Subject
Overview Articles
ISSN
0006-3568
eISSN
1525-3244
DOI
10.1641/0006-3568(2002)052[0019:LRSFES]2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Articles Lidar Remote Sensing for Ecosystem Studies MICHAEL A. LEFSKY, WARREN B. COHEN, GEOFFREY G. PARKER, AND DAVID J. HARDING emote sensing has facilitated extraordinary LIDAR, AN EMERGING REMOTE SENSING Radvances in the modeling, mapping, and understanding of ecosystems. Typical applications of remote sensing involve TECHNOLOGY THAT DIRECTLY MEASURES either images from passive optical systems, such as aerial photography and Landsat Thematic Mapper (Goward and THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL DISTRIBUTION Williams 1997), or to a lesser degree, active radar sensors such as RADARSAT (Waring et al. 1995). These types of sen- OF PLANT CANOPIES, CAN ACCURATELY sors have proven to be satisfactory for many ecological ap- ESTIMATE VEGETATION STRUCTURAL plications, such as mapping land cover into broad classes and, in some biomes, estimating aboveground biomass and ATTRIBUTES AND SHOULD BE OF leaf area index (LAI). Moreover, they enable researchers to an- alyze the spatial pattern of these images. PARTICULAR INTEREST TO FOREST, LAND- However, conventional sensors have significant limitations for ecological applications. The sensitivity and accuracy of SCAPE, AND GLOBAL ECOLOGISTS these devices have repeatedly been shown to fall with in- creasing aboveground biomass and leaf area index (Waring et al. 1995, Carlson and Ripley 1997, Turner et al. 1999). They

Journal

BioScienceOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off