Invasion resistance, species build‐up and community collapse in metapopulation models with interspecies competition

Invasion resistance, species build‐up and community collapse in metapopulation models with... Islands or habitat patches in a metapopulation exist as multi‐species communities. Community interactions link each species' dynamics so that the colonization of one species may cause the extinction of another. In this way, community interactions may set limits to the invadability of an island and to the likelihood of resident species extinctions upon invasion. To examine the nature of these limits, I assemble stable multi‐species Lotka‐Vollerra competition communities that differ in resident species number and the average strength (and variance) of species interactions. These are then invaded with species whose properties are drawn from the same distribution as the residents. The invader success rate and the extinction rate of resident species is determined as a function of community‐and species‐level properties. I show that the probability of colonization success for an invader decreases with species number and the strength and variance of interspecific interactions. Communities comprised of many strongly interacting species limit the invasion possibilities of competing species. Community interactions, even for a superior invading competitor, set up a sort of ‘activation barrier’ that repels the invader. This ‘priority effect’ for residents is not assumed a priori in my description for the individual population dynamics of these species, rather it arises because species‐rich and strongly‐interacting species sets have alternative stable states that tend to disfavour species at low densities. These models point to community‐level rather than invader‐level properties as the strongest determinant of differences in invasion success. If an invading species is successful it competitively displaces a greater number of resident species, on average, as community size increases. These results provide a logical framework for an island‐biogeographic theory based on species interactions and invasions and for the protection of fragile native species from invading exotics. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Journal of the Linnean Society Oxford University Press

Invasion resistance, species build‐up and community collapse in metapopulation models with interspecies competition

Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, Volume 42 (1‐2) – Jan 1, 1991

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/invasion-resistance-species-build-up-and-community-collapse-in-ygj0nZpjcj
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0024-4066
eISSN
1095-8312
DOI
10.1111/j.1095-8312.1991.tb00562.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Islands or habitat patches in a metapopulation exist as multi‐species communities. Community interactions link each species' dynamics so that the colonization of one species may cause the extinction of another. In this way, community interactions may set limits to the invadability of an island and to the likelihood of resident species extinctions upon invasion. To examine the nature of these limits, I assemble stable multi‐species Lotka‐Vollerra competition communities that differ in resident species number and the average strength (and variance) of species interactions. These are then invaded with species whose properties are drawn from the same distribution as the residents. The invader success rate and the extinction rate of resident species is determined as a function of community‐and species‐level properties. I show that the probability of colonization success for an invader decreases with species number and the strength and variance of interspecific interactions. Communities comprised of many strongly interacting species limit the invasion possibilities of competing species. Community interactions, even for a superior invading competitor, set up a sort of ‘activation barrier’ that repels the invader. This ‘priority effect’ for residents is not assumed a priori in my description for the individual population dynamics of these species, rather it arises because species‐rich and strongly‐interacting species sets have alternative stable states that tend to disfavour species at low densities. These models point to community‐level rather than invader‐level properties as the strongest determinant of differences in invasion success. If an invading species is successful it competitively displaces a greater number of resident species, on average, as community size increases. These results provide a logical framework for an island‐biogeographic theory based on species interactions and invasions and for the protection of fragile native species from invading exotics.

Journal

Biological Journal of the Linnean SocietyOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1991

References

  • The ecology of mutualism
    BOUCHER, BOUCHER; JAMES, JAMES; KEELER, KEELER
  • Factors contributing to non‐randomness in species co‐occurrences on islands
    GILPIN, GILPIN; DIAMOND, DIAMOND
  • Random number generators: good ones are hard to find
    PARK, PARK; MILLER, MILLER
  • Testing the invulnerability of laboratory island communities to invasion
    ROBINSON, ROBINSON; DICKERSON, DICKERSON

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off