Growth Hormone and Sex Steroid Effects on Bone Metabolism and Bone Mineral Density in Healthy Aged Women and Men

Growth Hormone and Sex Steroid Effects on Bone Metabolism and Bone Mineral Density in Healthy... Background. Aging is associated with concomitant declines in activity of the growth hormone (GH) and gonadal steroid axes, and in bone mineral density (BMD), in both sexes. Long-term estrogen replacement slows bone loss and prevents fractures in postmenopausal women, whereas the effects of supplementation of GH or testosterone on bone metabolism and BMD in aged individuals remains uncertain. Methods. Using a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study design, we investigated the separate and interactive effects of 6 months of administration of recombinant human GH and/or gonadal steroids on bone biochemical markers and BMD in 125 healthy, older (>65 years) women ( n = 53) and men ( n = 72) with age-related reductions in GH and gonadal steroids. Results. In women, administration of GH, but not GH + hormone replacement therapy (HRT), increased serum levels of osteocalcin and procollagen peptide (PICP) and increased urinary excretion of deoxypyridinoline (DPD) crosslinks. Urinary calcium excretion decreased after HRT. In men, GH, and to a greater extent GH + T, increased osteocalcin. GH increased serum PICP, and GH + T increased urinary DPD. Urinary calcium excretion was unaffected by hormone treatment in men. In women, administration of HRT and GH + HRT, but not GH, increased BMD at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and distal radius. In men, GH + T led to a small decrease in BMD at the proximal radius; there were no other significant effects of hormone administration on BMD. Conclusions. These data suggest that short-term administration of HRT exerts beneficial effects on bone metabolism and BMD in postmenopausal women, which are not significantly altered by the coadministration of GH. In andropausal men, T administration to achieve physiologic levels did not result in significant effects on bone metabolism or BMD, whereas GH + T increased one marker of bone formation and decreased one marker of bone resorption. Given the known biphasic actions of GH on bone and the apparent favorable biochemical effects of GH + T in men, the longer-term effects of GH + T on BMD in aged men remain to be clarified. In the Public Domain « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci (2002) 57 (1): M12-M18. doi: 10.1093/gerona/57.1.M12 » Abstract Free Full Text (HTML) Free Full Text (PDF) Free Classifications Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Christmas, C. Articles by Blackman, M. R. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Christmas, C. Articles by O'Connor, K. G. Articles by Harman, S. M. Articles by Tobin, J. D. Articles by Münzer, T. Articles by Bellantoni, M. F. Articles by Clair, C. S. Articles by Pabst, K. M. Articles by Sorkin, J. D. Articles by Blackman, M. R. Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google+ Mendeley Twitter What's this? Search this journal: Advanced » Current Issue November 2015 70 (11) Alert me to new issues The Journal About the journal Translational Articles Free Editors’ Choice Articles Impact Factor Articles The Journals of Gerontology, Series A Supplements Special Issues Rights & permissions We are mobile – find out more Journal Career Network Published on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America Impact Factor: 5.416 5-Yr impact factor: 5.406 Editorial Boards The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences Rafael de Cabo, PhD, Editor View full editorial board The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Medical Sciences Stephen B. Kritchevsky, PhD View full editorial board For the Media GSA Press Room For Authors Instructions to authors Services for authors Submit Now: Biological Sciences Submit Now: Medical Sciences Self-Archiving Policy Online Submission Open access options for authors - visit Oxford Open WhsSvhnOkaAwYG81FJCYgwG7z1LnIP2F true Looking for your next opportunity? Looking for jobs... jQuery_1_11 = jQuery.noConflict(true); Corporate Services What we offer Advertising sales Reprints Supplements Classified Advertising Sales Alerting Services Email table of contents CiteTrack XML RSS feed var taxonomies = ("MED00280", "SCI00960"); Most Most Read A Genetic Network Associated With Stress Resistance, Longevity, and Cancer in Humans A 2-Year Randomized Controlled Trial of Human Caloric Restriction: Feasibility and Effects on Predictors of Health Span and Longevity Frailty in Older Adults: Evidence for a Phenotype Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Quality of Life in Older Adults: Summary The Top 10 Hot Topics in Aging » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Frailty in Older Adults: Evidence for a Phenotype Lower Extremity Function and Subsequent Disability: Consistency Across Studies, Predictive Models, and Value of Gait Speed Alone Compared With the Short Physical Performance Battery The Loss of Skeletal Muscle Strength, Mass, and Quality in Older Adults: The Health, Aging and Body Composition Study Muscle Mass, Muscle Strength, and Muscle Fat Infiltration as Predictors of Incident Mobility Limitations in Well-Functioning Older Persons Strength, But Not Muscle Mass, Is Associated With Mortality in the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study Cohort » View all Most Cited articles Disclaimer: Please note that abstracts for content published before 1996 were created through digital scanning and may therefore not exactly replicate the text of the original print issues. All efforts have been made to ensure accuracy, but the Publisher will not be held responsible for any remaining inaccuracies. If you require any further clarification, please contact our Customer Services Department. Online ISSN 1758-535X - Print ISSN 1079-5006 Copyright © 2015 The Gerontological Society of America Oxford Journals Oxford University Press Site Map Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Legal Notices Frequently Asked Questions Other Oxford University Press sites: Oxford University Press Oxford Journals China Oxford Journals Japan Academic & Professional books Children's & Schools Books Dictionaries & Reference Dictionary of National Biography Digital Reference English Language Teaching Higher Education Textbooks International Education Unit Law Medicine Music Online Products & Publishing Oxford Bibliographies Online Oxford Dictionaries Online Oxford English Dictionary Oxford Language Dictionaries Online Oxford Scholarship Online Reference Rights and Permissions Resources for Retailers & Wholesalers Resources for the Healthcare Industry Very Short Introductions World's Classics function fnc_onDomLoaded() { var query_context = getQueryContext(); PF_initOIUnderbar(query_context,":QS:default","","JRN"); PF_insertOIUnderbar(0); }; if (window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', fnc_onDomLoaded, false); } else if (window.attachEvent) { window.attachEvent('onload', fnc_onDomLoaded); } var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); try { var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-189672-16"); pageTracker._setDomainName(".oxfordjournals.org"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); } catch(err) {} http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical Sciences Oxford University Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/growth-hormone-and-sex-steroid-effects-on-bone-metabolism-and-bone-3VHbUNjYLg
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 The Gerontological Society of America
ISSN
1079-5006
eISSN
1758-535X
DOI
10.1093/gerona/57.1.M12
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background. Aging is associated with concomitant declines in activity of the growth hormone (GH) and gonadal steroid axes, and in bone mineral density (BMD), in both sexes. Long-term estrogen replacement slows bone loss and prevents fractures in postmenopausal women, whereas the effects of supplementation of GH or testosterone on bone metabolism and BMD in aged individuals remains uncertain. Methods. Using a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study design, we investigated the separate and interactive effects of 6 months of administration of recombinant human GH and/or gonadal steroids on bone biochemical markers and BMD in 125 healthy, older (>65 years) women ( n = 53) and men ( n = 72) with age-related reductions in GH and gonadal steroids. Results. In women, administration of GH, but not GH + hormone replacement therapy (HRT), increased serum levels of osteocalcin and procollagen peptide (PICP) and increased urinary excretion of deoxypyridinoline (DPD) crosslinks. Urinary calcium excretion decreased after HRT. In men, GH, and to a greater extent GH + T, increased osteocalcin. GH increased serum PICP, and GH + T increased urinary DPD. Urinary calcium excretion was unaffected by hormone treatment in men. In women, administration of HRT and GH + HRT, but not GH, increased BMD at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and distal radius. In men, GH + T led to a small decrease in BMD at the proximal radius; there were no other significant effects of hormone administration on BMD. Conclusions. These data suggest that short-term administration of HRT exerts beneficial effects on bone metabolism and BMD in postmenopausal women, which are not significantly altered by the coadministration of GH. In andropausal men, T administration to achieve physiologic levels did not result in significant effects on bone metabolism or BMD, whereas GH + T increased one marker of bone formation and decreased one marker of bone resorption. Given the known biphasic actions of GH on bone and the apparent favorable biochemical effects of GH + T in men, the longer-term effects of GH + T on BMD in aged men remain to be clarified. In the Public Domain « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci (2002) 57 (1): M12-M18. doi: 10.1093/gerona/57.1.M12 » Abstract Free Full Text (HTML) Free Full Text (PDF) Free Classifications Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Christmas, C. Articles by Blackman, M. R. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Christmas, C. Articles by O'Connor, K. G. Articles by Harman, S. M. Articles by Tobin, J. D. Articles by Münzer, T. Articles by Bellantoni, M. F. Articles by Clair, C. S. Articles by Pabst, K. M. Articles by Sorkin, J. D. Articles by Blackman, M. R. Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google+ Mendeley Twitter What's this? Search this journal: Advanced » Current Issue November 2015 70 (11) Alert me to new issues The Journal About the journal Translational Articles Free Editors’ Choice Articles Impact Factor Articles The Journals of Gerontology, Series A Supplements Special Issues Rights & permissions We are mobile – find out more Journal Career Network Published on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America Impact Factor: 5.416 5-Yr impact factor: 5.406 Editorial Boards The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences Rafael de Cabo, PhD, Editor View full editorial board The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Medical Sciences Stephen B. Kritchevsky, PhD View full editorial board For the Media GSA Press Room For Authors Instructions to authors Services for authors Submit Now: Biological Sciences Submit Now: Medical Sciences Self-Archiving Policy Online Submission Open access options for authors - visit Oxford Open WhsSvhnOkaAwYG81FJCYgwG7z1LnIP2F true Looking for your next opportunity? Looking for jobs... jQuery_1_11 = jQuery.noConflict(true); Corporate Services What we offer Advertising sales Reprints Supplements Classified Advertising Sales Alerting Services Email table of contents CiteTrack XML RSS feed var taxonomies = ("MED00280", "SCI00960"); Most Most Read A Genetic Network Associated With Stress Resistance, Longevity, and Cancer in Humans A 2-Year Randomized Controlled Trial of Human Caloric Restriction: Feasibility and Effects on Predictors of Health Span and Longevity Frailty in Older Adults: Evidence for a Phenotype Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Quality of Life in Older Adults: Summary The Top 10 Hot Topics in Aging » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Frailty in Older Adults: Evidence for a Phenotype Lower Extremity Function and Subsequent Disability: Consistency Across Studies, Predictive Models, and Value of Gait Speed Alone Compared With the Short Physical Performance Battery The Loss of Skeletal Muscle Strength, Mass, and Quality in Older Adults: The Health, Aging and Body Composition Study Muscle Mass, Muscle Strength, and Muscle Fat Infiltration as Predictors of Incident Mobility Limitations in Well-Functioning Older Persons Strength, But Not Muscle Mass, Is Associated With Mortality in the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study Cohort » View all Most Cited articles Disclaimer: Please note that abstracts for content published before 1996 were created through digital scanning and may therefore not exactly replicate the text of the original print issues. All efforts have been made to ensure accuracy, but the Publisher will not be held responsible for any remaining inaccuracies. If you require any further clarification, please contact our Customer Services Department. Online ISSN 1758-535X - Print ISSN 1079-5006 Copyright © 2015 The Gerontological Society of America Oxford Journals Oxford University Press Site Map Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Legal Notices Frequently Asked Questions Other Oxford University Press sites: Oxford University Press Oxford Journals China Oxford Journals Japan Academic & Professional books Children's & Schools Books Dictionaries & Reference Dictionary of National Biography Digital Reference English Language Teaching Higher Education Textbooks International Education Unit Law Medicine Music Online Products & Publishing Oxford Bibliographies Online Oxford Dictionaries Online Oxford English Dictionary Oxford Language Dictionaries Online Oxford Scholarship Online Reference Rights and Permissions Resources for Retailers & Wholesalers Resources for the Healthcare Industry Very Short Introductions World's Classics function fnc_onDomLoaded() { var query_context = getQueryContext(); PF_initOIUnderbar(query_context,":QS:default","","JRN"); PF_insertOIUnderbar(0); }; if (window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', fnc_onDomLoaded, false); } else if (window.attachEvent) { window.attachEvent('onload', fnc_onDomLoaded); } var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); try { var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-189672-16"); pageTracker._setDomainName(".oxfordjournals.org"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); } catch(err) {}

Journal

The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical SciencesOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off