Genetics of insular populations of mammals, with particular reference to differentiation and founder effects in British small mammals

Genetics of insular populations of mammals, with particular reference to differentiation and... Island populations are of interest for their differentiation as well as their species diversity; some of the earliest biological interest in islands was concerned with the number of ‘endemics’ thereon. There is dispute about the long‐term evolutionary importance of island forms, but they are rich sources of data for studying the under‐exploited interface of genetics, ecology and physiology. Differentiation of island populations may arise from genetic change after isolation, or from the chance collection of alleles carried by the colonizing group itself. The general reduction of genetic variance in island populations compared to continental forms of the same species suggests that founder events have played a major role in the formation of most island forms. However, there is ample evidence of adaptation in island populations despite this lower variation; this is relevant when using island biology as a base for the deriving of rules for genetic conservation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Journal of the Linnean Society Oxford University Press

Genetics of insular populations of mammals, with particular reference to differentiation and founder effects in British small mammals

Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, Volume 28 (1‐2) – May 1, 1986

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0024-4066
eISSN
1095-8312
DOI
10.1111/j.1095-8312.1986.tb01754.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Island populations are of interest for their differentiation as well as their species diversity; some of the earliest biological interest in islands was concerned with the number of ‘endemics’ thereon. There is dispute about the long‐term evolutionary importance of island forms, but they are rich sources of data for studying the under‐exploited interface of genetics, ecology and physiology. Differentiation of island populations may arise from genetic change after isolation, or from the chance collection of alleles carried by the colonizing group itself. The general reduction of genetic variance in island populations compared to continental forms of the same species suggests that founder events have played a major role in the formation of most island forms. However, there is ample evidence of adaptation in island populations despite this lower variation; this is relevant when using island biology as a base for the deriving of rules for genetic conservation.

Journal

Biological Journal of the Linnean SocietyOxford University Press

Published: May 1, 1986

References

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