Funding Extinction? Biological Needs and Political Realities in the Allocation of Resources to Endangered Species Recovery

Funding Extinction? Biological Needs and Political Realities in the Allocation of Resources to... Forum Funding Extinction? Biological Needs and Political Realities in the Allocation of Resources to Endangered Species Recovery MARCO RESTANI AND JOHN M. MARZLUFF ur nation’s endangered species require AN EXISTING PRIORITY SYSTEM, WHICH Oimplementation of scientifically based recovery actions SHOULD GUIDE THE FISH AND WILDLIFE to attain sustainable population sizes and to avert extinc- tion. Crafting recovery approaches is often politically con- SERVICE IN ENDANGERED SPECIES RECOV- tentious and scientifically challenging, but it proceeds rea- sonably well through the writing of legislated recovery plans. ERY, IS INEFFECTIVE, AND CURRENT Implementation of planned recovery strategies, however, is much more difficult because it often curtails resource use by SPENDING PATTERNS DECREASE LONG- humans and requires adequate funding. Implementation de- TERM VIABILITY OF ISLAND SPECIES cisions ultimately are made by the US Fish and Wildlife Ser- vice (FWS) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), both of which are tasked with administering the Endangered Species Act (ESA). However, many stakeholders with con- flicting goals, differing reward structures, and varying routes of influence are wedded to implementation decisions (Figure Marco Restani (e-mail: restanim@rocky.edu) is an assistant profes- 1). Those stakeholders—a public composed of resource users sor in the Department of Biology, Rocky Mountain http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BioScience Oxford University Press

Funding Extinction? Biological Needs and Political Realities in the Allocation of Resources to Endangered Species Recovery

BioScience, Volume 52 (2) – Feb 1, 2002

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2002 American Institute of Biological Sciences
Subject
Departments
ISSN
0006-3568
eISSN
1525-3244
DOI
10.1641/0006-3568(2002)052[0169:FEBNAP]2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Forum Funding Extinction? Biological Needs and Political Realities in the Allocation of Resources to Endangered Species Recovery MARCO RESTANI AND JOHN M. MARZLUFF ur nation’s endangered species require AN EXISTING PRIORITY SYSTEM, WHICH Oimplementation of scientifically based recovery actions SHOULD GUIDE THE FISH AND WILDLIFE to attain sustainable population sizes and to avert extinc- tion. Crafting recovery approaches is often politically con- SERVICE IN ENDANGERED SPECIES RECOV- tentious and scientifically challenging, but it proceeds rea- sonably well through the writing of legislated recovery plans. ERY, IS INEFFECTIVE, AND CURRENT Implementation of planned recovery strategies, however, is much more difficult because it often curtails resource use by SPENDING PATTERNS DECREASE LONG- humans and requires adequate funding. Implementation de- TERM VIABILITY OF ISLAND SPECIES cisions ultimately are made by the US Fish and Wildlife Ser- vice (FWS) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), both of which are tasked with administering the Endangered Species Act (ESA). However, many stakeholders with con- flicting goals, differing reward structures, and varying routes of influence are wedded to implementation decisions (Figure Marco Restani (e-mail: restanim@rocky.edu) is an assistant profes- 1). Those stakeholders—a public composed of resource users sor in the Department of Biology, Rocky Mountain

Journal

BioScienceOxford University Press

Published: Feb 1, 2002

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