Forest regeneration composition and development in upland, mixed-oak forests

Forest regeneration composition and development in upland, mixed-oak forests Advance regeneration in 52 mature mixed-oak stands was analyzed and described. Red maple (Acer rubrum L.) was the most abundant species in the study area. Among oak (Quercus) species, northern red oak (Q. rubra L.) was the most abundant within the Allegheny Plateau physiographic province, whereas chestnut oak (Q. montana L.) was the most abundant within the Ridge and Valley physiographic province. Sixteen stands, for which data are available through the fourth growing season following harvest, were used to describe stand development. Cumulative height, a composite measure of size and density, was used to describe early stand development. Black gum (Nyssa sylvatica Marsh.) and black birch (Betula lenta L.) had dramatic increases in stand density and cumulative height after overstory removal. Cumulative height of northern red oak and chestnut oak showed a faster positive response to overstory removal than red maple. Oak retained its dominance in cumulative height for at least 4 years after harvest. Red maple nevertheless remained the most abundant tree species after overstory removal. Our results suggest that the principal advantage of red maple regeneration is its ability to accumulate in large numbers prior to harvest. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tree Physiology Oxford University Press

Forest regeneration composition and development in upland, mixed-oak forests

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0829-318X
eISSN
1758-4469
D.O.I.
10.1093/treephys/25.12.1495
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Advance regeneration in 52 mature mixed-oak stands was analyzed and described. Red maple (Acer rubrum L.) was the most abundant species in the study area. Among oak (Quercus) species, northern red oak (Q. rubra L.) was the most abundant within the Allegheny Plateau physiographic province, whereas chestnut oak (Q. montana L.) was the most abundant within the Ridge and Valley physiographic province. Sixteen stands, for which data are available through the fourth growing season following harvest, were used to describe stand development. Cumulative height, a composite measure of size and density, was used to describe early stand development. Black gum (Nyssa sylvatica Marsh.) and black birch (Betula lenta L.) had dramatic increases in stand density and cumulative height after overstory removal. Cumulative height of northern red oak and chestnut oak showed a faster positive response to overstory removal than red maple. Oak retained its dominance in cumulative height for at least 4 years after harvest. Red maple nevertheless remained the most abundant tree species after overstory removal. Our results suggest that the principal advantage of red maple regeneration is its ability to accumulate in large numbers prior to harvest.

Journal

Tree PhysiologyOxford University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2005

Keywords: cumulative height dominance Pennsylvania

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