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EVALUATION OF SWEET POTATO GERMPLASM FOR RESISTANCE TO SWEETPOTATO WEEVIL, 2011

EVALUATION OF SWEET POTATO GERMPLASM FOR RESISTANCE TO SWEETPOTATO WEEVIL, 2011 Arthropod Management Tests 2012, Vol. 37 doi: 10.4182/amt.2012.M8 (M8) SWEET POTATO: Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam, ‘Beauregard’ Richard N. Story Dept. Entomology, LAES LSU AgCenter Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (225) 578-1833 Email: rstory@lsu.edu M.J. Murray Email: mmurray@agcenter.lsu.edu D.R. LaBonte Dept. Horticulture, LAES LSU AgCenter Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (225) 578-1024 Email: dlabon@lsu.edu Sweetpotato weevil: Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Summers) A whole root, no choice bioassay procedure was used for screening sweetpotato accessions for resistance to the sweetpotato weevil. Sweetpotato accessions were grown using standard grower practices during the 2010 growing season. Roots were harvested, cured, and stored for 1 to 2 months before the bioassay was started in Jan 2011. Plant material came from Baton Rouge, Louisiana (Burden Research Station, LSUAC), and the Sweet Potato Research Station, Chase, Louisiana. Individual roots were placed in one quart, cylindrical (3 3/8" dia) paper containers. A RCB design was used where blocks were replicated through time for a total of 4-5 replications. For each block, one root from all lines was infested with weevils from a sweetpotato weevil culture. Six female weevils were placed with the root in each container. After 4 days exposure, the female weevils were removed from the containers and returned to the culture. The containers were covered with lids and placed on a shelf in an environmentally controlled room where temperature was maintained at a constant 80°F using a window mounted air conditioner. Humidity was maintained at approximately 80%. Starting at approximately 30 calendar days after the first day of exposure to the weevils, containers were examined on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday to count the number of emerging adults. Counts were made for a period of 4 weeks, for a total of 12 counts. In most cases, th th the counts were at or near 0 by the 10 or 11 count so it was unnecessary to continue beyond that point. The total number of weevils that emerged was used to compare the relative resistance of each genotype. Data were analyzed with SAS using GLM and Duncan’s Multiple Range Test for mean separation (α = 0.05). The mean number of weevils emerging from sweetpotato roots varied considerably. Differences in weevil emergence may be a function of oviposition nonpreference, larval antibiosis, or a combination of both. Beauregard was the standard susceptible commercial variety. It had 31.7 mean weevils emerging. Evangeline was the most susceptible, with 39.5 weevils emerging. Ruddy had an intermediate level of weevil emergence (13.1) while Murasaki had the lowest level of weevil emergence (2.5). Murasaki and 6 assessions had significantly lower mean weevil emergence compared with Beauregard. 1 Arthropod Management Tests 2012, Vol. 37 doi: 10.4182/amt.2012.M8 Accession No. replicates Mean weevil emergence Evangeline 10 39.50a 05-111 10 32.30ab Beauregard 9 31.78ab 07-146 9 27.00abc P7-130 10 25.30abc 05-29 10 25.20abc 10-81 9 23.55abc 10-71 5 22.00abc 08-29w 10 15.70bc 08-46w 7 13.43bc Ruddy 10 13.10bc 10-64 5 12.40bc 08-31w 9 12.33bc 08-48w 10 11.40bc 08-38w 6 10.50bc 10-72 6 8.33bc 08-43w 10 8.30bc 08-9w 7 8.23bc 10-66 5 6.60c 08-7w 6 6.00c 10-80 5 4.00c 10-79 5 3.60c 10-63 5 3.00c 10-65 6 3.00c Murasaki 6 2.50c Means within a column followed by the same letter are not significantly different (α = 0.05; DMRT) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arthropod Management Tests Oxford University Press

EVALUATION OF SWEET POTATO GERMPLASM FOR RESISTANCE TO SWEETPOTATO WEEVIL, 2011

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10.4182/amt.2012.M8
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Abstract

Arthropod Management Tests 2012, Vol. 37 doi: 10.4182/amt.2012.M8 (M8) SWEET POTATO: Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam, ‘Beauregard’ Richard N. Story Dept. Entomology, LAES LSU AgCenter Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (225) 578-1833 Email: rstory@lsu.edu M.J. Murray Email: mmurray@agcenter.lsu.edu D.R. LaBonte Dept. Horticulture, LAES LSU AgCenter Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (225) 578-1024 Email: dlabon@lsu.edu Sweetpotato weevil: Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Summers) A whole root, no choice bioassay procedure was used for screening sweetpotato accessions for resistance to the sweetpotato weevil. Sweetpotato accessions were grown using standard grower practices during the 2010 growing season. Roots were harvested, cured, and stored for 1 to 2 months before the bioassay was started in Jan 2011. Plant material came from Baton Rouge, Louisiana (Burden Research Station, LSUAC), and the Sweet Potato Research Station, Chase, Louisiana. Individual roots were placed in one quart, cylindrical (3 3/8" dia) paper containers. A RCB design was used where blocks were replicated through time for a total of 4-5 replications. For each block, one root from all lines was infested with weevils from a sweetpotato weevil culture. Six female weevils were placed with the root in each container. After 4 days exposure, the female weevils were removed from the containers and returned to the culture. The containers were covered with lids and placed on a shelf in an environmentally controlled room where temperature was maintained at a constant 80°F using a window mounted air conditioner. Humidity was maintained at approximately 80%. Starting at approximately 30 calendar days after the first day of exposure to the weevils, containers were examined on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday to count the number of emerging adults. Counts were made for a period of 4 weeks, for a total of 12 counts. In most cases, th th the counts were at or near 0 by the 10 or 11 count so it was unnecessary to continue beyond that point. The total number of weevils that emerged was used to compare the relative resistance of each genotype. Data were analyzed with SAS using GLM and Duncan’s Multiple Range Test for mean separation (α = 0.05). The mean number of weevils emerging from sweetpotato roots varied considerably. Differences in weevil emergence may be a function of oviposition nonpreference, larval antibiosis, or a combination of both. Beauregard was the standard susceptible commercial variety. It had 31.7 mean weevils emerging. Evangeline was the most susceptible, with 39.5 weevils emerging. Ruddy had an intermediate level of weevil emergence (13.1) while Murasaki had the lowest level of weevil emergence (2.5). Murasaki and 6 assessions had significantly lower mean weevil emergence compared with Beauregard. 1 Arthropod Management Tests 2012, Vol. 37 doi: 10.4182/amt.2012.M8 Accession No. replicates Mean weevil emergence Evangeline 10 39.50a 05-111 10 32.30ab Beauregard 9 31.78ab 07-146 9 27.00abc P7-130 10 25.30abc 05-29 10 25.20abc 10-81 9 23.55abc 10-71 5 22.00abc 08-29w 10 15.70bc 08-46w 7 13.43bc Ruddy 10 13.10bc 10-64 5 12.40bc 08-31w 9 12.33bc 08-48w 10 11.40bc 08-38w 6 10.50bc 10-72 6 8.33bc 08-43w 10 8.30bc 08-9w 7 8.23bc 10-66 5 6.60c 08-7w 6 6.00c 10-80 5 4.00c 10-79 5 3.60c 10-63 5 3.00c 10-65 6 3.00c Murasaki 6 2.50c Means within a column followed by the same letter are not significantly different (α = 0.05; DMRT)

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Arthropod Management TestsOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2012

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