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End-point Recognition in Pressure Chamber Measurements of Water Potential of Viguiera porteri (Asteraceae)

End-point Recognition in Pressure Chamber Measurements of Water Potential of Viguiera porteri (Asteraceae) Department of Biology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, U.S.A. (Accepted: 21 April 1981) Downloaded from aob.oxfordjournals.org at Infovell on November 13, 2010 Key words: Viguieraporteri, confederate daisy, pressure chamber, water potential. Scholander et al. (1964, 1965) pioneered the use of the pressure chamber in measuring plant water status. Waring and Geary (1967) argued that this measurement of xylem pressure potential can be used as an estimate of total water potential since the osmotic and matric components in the xylem are small. Since then, the pressure chamber has been widely used as a way of measuring the water potential of plants in the field. Recognition of the end point at which the balancing pressure equals the xylem pressure potential is sometimes difficult. Two kinds of problem have been encountered. Bubbling on the cut surface before balancing pressure is reached has been observed in Vitis (Klepper and Ceccato, 1968), Gossypium (Jordan, 1970) and Stylosanthes (McCown and Wall, 1979), and resin exudation at low pressures can complicate end-point recognition in conifers (Kaufmann, 1968; Ritchie and Hinckely, 1971). Interpretation of these events as xylem exudation at balancing pressure leads to an over-estimation of xylem pressure potential. A somewhat different problem was observed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Botany Oxford University Press

End-point Recognition in Pressure Chamber Measurements of Water Potential of Viguiera porteri (Asteraceae)

Abstract

Department of Biology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, U.S.A. (Accepted: 21 April 1981) Downloaded from aob.oxfordjournals.org at Infovell on November 13, 2010 Key words: Viguieraporteri, confederate daisy, pressure chamber, water potential. Scholander et al. (1964, 1965) pioneered the use of the pressure chamber in measuring plant water status. Waring and Geary (1967) argued that this measurement of xylem pressure potential can be used as an estimate of total water potential since the osmotic and matric components in the xylem are small. Since then, the pressure chamber has been widely used as a way of measuring the water potential of plants in the field. Recognition of the end point at which the balancing pressure equals the xylem pressure potential is sometimes difficult. Two kinds of problem have been encountered. Bubbling on the cut surface before balancing pressure is reached has been observed in Vitis (Klepper and Ceccato, 1968), Gossypium (Jordan, 1970) and Stylosanthes (McCown and Wall, 1979), and resin exudation at low pressures can complicate end-point recognition in conifers (Kaufmann, 1968; Ritchie and Hinckely, 1971). Interpretation of these events as xylem exudation at balancing pressure leads to an over-estimation of xylem pressure potential. A somewhat different problem was observed
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