Empirical methods in antitrust litigation: review and critique

Empirical methods in antitrust litigation: review and critique Jonathan B. Baker, American University, and Daniel L. Rubinfeld, University of California, Berkeley 1. Introduction The use of empirical methods in antitrust has been growing at an exponential rate. It is now commonplace for multiple regression and other statistical methods to be utilized in merger cases, especially those involving predictions of the price increases that may result from the strategic decisions of the merging firms. These methods are also prominently employed in civil nonmerger investigations by the federal antitrust enforcement agencies (including price fixing, monopolization, and exclusive dealing cases) and in private litigation (including damage claims and class action suits). This article surveys the methodologies that have been used and the range of questions that they address. It also provides a critical examination of the growing set of statistical tools that are available for use in antitrust analysis. Why has the use of empirical methods grown so rapidly? There are important demand and supply-side explanations. On the supply side, the rapid improvement in computer technology has made empirical We are grateful to Tim Bresnahan, Aviv Nevo, Donna Patterson, Scott Stern, Mary Sullivan, Chuck Thomas, Scott Thompson, Bob Town, Mike Vita, and Greg Werden for their helpful comments. Send http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Law and Economics Review Oxford University Press

Empirical methods in antitrust litigation: review and critique

American Law and Economics Review , Volume 1 (1)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/empirical-methods-in-antitrust-litigation-review-and-critique-wiRISqBLqI
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999
ISSN
1465-7252
eISSN
1465-7260
D.O.I.
10.1093/aler/1.1.386
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Jonathan B. Baker, American University, and Daniel L. Rubinfeld, University of California, Berkeley 1. Introduction The use of empirical methods in antitrust has been growing at an exponential rate. It is now commonplace for multiple regression and other statistical methods to be utilized in merger cases, especially those involving predictions of the price increases that may result from the strategic decisions of the merging firms. These methods are also prominently employed in civil nonmerger investigations by the federal antitrust enforcement agencies (including price fixing, monopolization, and exclusive dealing cases) and in private litigation (including damage claims and class action suits). This article surveys the methodologies that have been used and the range of questions that they address. It also provides a critical examination of the growing set of statistical tools that are available for use in antitrust analysis. Why has the use of empirical methods grown so rapidly? There are important demand and supply-side explanations. On the supply side, the rapid improvement in computer technology has made empirical We are grateful to Tim Bresnahan, Aviv Nevo, Donna Patterson, Scott Stern, Mary Sullivan, Chuck Thomas, Scott Thompson, Bob Town, Mike Vita, and Greg Werden for their helpful comments. Send

Journal

American Law and Economics ReviewOxford University Press

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off