Effect of exercise training on plasma levels of C-reactive protein in healthy adults: the HERITAGE Family Study

Effect of exercise training on plasma levels of C-reactive protein in healthy adults: the... Aims To study the effect of exercise training on plasma C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation.Methods and results We performed a 20 week standardized exercise training programme in 652 sedentary healthy white and black men and women. C-reactive protein was measured with a high sensitivity assay. The study sample was stratified according to baseline C-reactive protein levels using a recommended classification (low <1.0 mg/L, n=265; moderate 1.0–3.0 mg/L, n=225; high >3.0 mg/L, n=162). The median C-reactive protein reduction was 1.34 mg/L in the high baseline C-reactive protein group. C-reactive protein levels did not change in the low or moderate baseline C-reactive protein groups. The difference among the C-reactive protein groups was significant adjusting for all correlates of baseline C-reactive protein (P<0.001) and additionally for changes in body weight, glucose, insulin, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake (P<0.001). The C-reactive protein reduction in the high baseline C-reactive protein group was consistent across all population groups (P<0.001 for difference among baseline C-reactive protein groups).Conclusion Plasma C-reactive protein levels are reduced in response to exercise training in sedentary healthy adults with high initial C-reactive protein levels. This finding may partly explain the effectiveness of regular physical activity in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Heart Journal Oxford University Press

Effect of exercise training on plasma levels of C-reactive protein in healthy adults: the HERITAGE Family Study

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The European Society of Cardiology 2005. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org
ISSN
0195-668X
eISSN
1522-9645
D.O.I.
10.1093/eurheartj/ehi394
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aims To study the effect of exercise training on plasma C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation.Methods and results We performed a 20 week standardized exercise training programme in 652 sedentary healthy white and black men and women. C-reactive protein was measured with a high sensitivity assay. The study sample was stratified according to baseline C-reactive protein levels using a recommended classification (low <1.0 mg/L, n=265; moderate 1.0–3.0 mg/L, n=225; high >3.0 mg/L, n=162). The median C-reactive protein reduction was 1.34 mg/L in the high baseline C-reactive protein group. C-reactive protein levels did not change in the low or moderate baseline C-reactive protein groups. The difference among the C-reactive protein groups was significant adjusting for all correlates of baseline C-reactive protein (P<0.001) and additionally for changes in body weight, glucose, insulin, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake (P<0.001). The C-reactive protein reduction in the high baseline C-reactive protein group was consistent across all population groups (P<0.001 for difference among baseline C-reactive protein groups).Conclusion Plasma C-reactive protein levels are reduced in response to exercise training in sedentary healthy adults with high initial C-reactive protein levels. This finding may partly explain the effectiveness of regular physical activity in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

Journal

European Heart JournalOxford University Press

Published: Oct 29, 2005

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