Dispersal and connectivity in metapopulations

Dispersal and connectivity in metapopulations This paper reviews characteristics of dispersal that influence metapopulation functioning, such as releasing factors, density dependence, timing and types and health of dispersers. Economic thresholds, intraspecific conflicts and avoidance of inbreeding arc often regarded as the key ultimate or proximate (or both) causes of dispersal, but there is no consensus about the most important mechanisms. Dispersing individuals arc often considered to differ genetically from the residents but good supporting evidence has only been presented for some insect species. Sex and age differences in dispersal rates are most common in polygamous species and in long‐lived species with many litters per female. A bimodal distribution of dispersal distances, earlier thought to be a common pattern, is probably an artifact, caused by habitat heterogeneity and varying survival of settled individuals. Dispersal distances are longer in poor environments. Habitat specialists are more affected by boundaries during dispersal than generalists. Dispersal just before or during the early reproductive season is common in certain species occupying early successional habitats. Dispersal increased both population and metapopulation size and persistence in plants, insects and small mammals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Journal of the Linnean Society Oxford University Press

Dispersal and connectivity in metapopulations

Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, Volume 42 (1‐2) – Jan 1, 1991

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0024-4066
eISSN
1095-8312
DOI
10.1111/j.1095-8312.1991.tb00553.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper reviews characteristics of dispersal that influence metapopulation functioning, such as releasing factors, density dependence, timing and types and health of dispersers. Economic thresholds, intraspecific conflicts and avoidance of inbreeding arc often regarded as the key ultimate or proximate (or both) causes of dispersal, but there is no consensus about the most important mechanisms. Dispersing individuals arc often considered to differ genetically from the residents but good supporting evidence has only been presented for some insect species. Sex and age differences in dispersal rates are most common in polygamous species and in long‐lived species with many litters per female. A bimodal distribution of dispersal distances, earlier thought to be a common pattern, is probably an artifact, caused by habitat heterogeneity and varying survival of settled individuals. Dispersal distances are longer in poor environments. Habitat specialists are more affected by boundaries during dispersal than generalists. Dispersal just before or during the early reproductive season is common in certain species occupying early successional habitats. Dispersal increased both population and metapopulation size and persistence in plants, insects and small mammals.

Journal

Biological Journal of the Linnean SocietyOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1991

References

  • Patterns of dispersion, density and dispersal in alpine populations of the land snail Arianta arbustorum (L.) (Helicidae)
    BAUR, BAUR
  • Dispersal tendency and duration of life of littermates during population fluctuations of the vole Microtus townsendii
    BEACHAM, BEACHAM
  • Vole population cycles: A case for kin‐selection
    CHARNOV, CHARNOV; FINERTY, FINERTY
  • On the significance of dispersal power for populations of carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae)
    BOER, BOER
  • Colonization in metapopulations: a review of theory and observations
    EBENHARD, EBENHARD
  • Dispersal in small mammals
    GAINES, GAINES; McCLENAGHAN, McCLENAGHAN
  • The natal and breeding dispersal of birds
    GREENWOOD, GREENWOOD; HARVEY, HARVEY
  • Population dynamics of shrews on small islands accord with the equilibrium model
    HANSKI, HANSKI
  • Single‐species metapopulation dynamics: concepts, models and observations
    HANSKI, HANSKI
  • Dispersal routes of small mammals at an abandoned field in central Sweden
    HANSSON, HANSSON
  • Spatial dynamics in fluctuating vole populations
    HANSSON, HANSSON
  • Dispersal polymorphism in insects
    HARRISON, HARRISON
  • Phase transformation in locust biology
    KENNEDY, KENNEDY
  • Phenotypic variation in electromorphs previously considered to be genetic markers in Microtus ochrogaster
    McGOVERN, McGOVERN; TRACY, TRACY
  • The effect of conspecific attraction on metapopulation dynamics
    RAY, RAY; GILPIN, GILPIN; SMITH, SMITH

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