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Discontinuation of Growth Hormone (GH) Treatment: Metabolic Effects in GH-Deficient and GH-Sufficient Adolescent Patients Compared with Control Subjects1

Discontinuation of Growth Hormone (GH) Treatment: Metabolic Effects in GH-Deficient and... The need for continuing GH replacement in patients with childhood-onset GH deficiency continuing into adulthood has been recognized. The metabolic consequences of discontinuing GH in adolescent patients with childhood-onset GH deficiency and short stature were examined over a period of 2 yr. Forty adolescents (aged 16–21 yr) receiving GH treatment for more than 3 yr and 16 closely matched healthy controls were studied. After a baseline visit, GH treatment was discontinued. The patients were then examined with the same protocol once a year for 2 yr. Twenty-one patients had severe GH deficiency (GHD) into adulthood, whereas 19 patients were regarded as having sufficient endogenous GH secretion (GHS). After 2 yr without GH treatment, the serum insulin-like growth factor I level was lower in GHD than in both GHS and control subjects. Both before and 2 yr after GH treatment was discontinued, serum concentrations of total cholesterol (C), low density lipoprotein C, and apolipoprotein B were higher in the GHD than in both GHS and control subjects. Serum concentrations of high density lipoprotein C decreased in the GHD group and increased in the other 2 study groups. The amount of total body and abdominal fat mass throughout the study and the increment in these masses were more marked in the GHD than in the GHS and control subjects when GH treatment was discontinued.The discontinuation of GH therapy in adolescents with severe GHD continuing into adulthood results over a period of 2 yr in the accumulation of important cardiovascular risk factors that are associated with GHD in adults. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Oxford University Press

Discontinuation of Growth Hormone (GH) Treatment: Metabolic Effects in GH-Deficient and GH-Sufficient Adolescent Patients Compared with Control Subjects1

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References (46)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by The Endocrine Society
ISSN
0021-972X
eISSN
1945-7197
DOI
10.1210/jcem.84.12.6176
pmid
10599711
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The need for continuing GH replacement in patients with childhood-onset GH deficiency continuing into adulthood has been recognized. The metabolic consequences of discontinuing GH in adolescent patients with childhood-onset GH deficiency and short stature were examined over a period of 2 yr. Forty adolescents (aged 16–21 yr) receiving GH treatment for more than 3 yr and 16 closely matched healthy controls were studied. After a baseline visit, GH treatment was discontinued. The patients were then examined with the same protocol once a year for 2 yr. Twenty-one patients had severe GH deficiency (GHD) into adulthood, whereas 19 patients were regarded as having sufficient endogenous GH secretion (GHS). After 2 yr without GH treatment, the serum insulin-like growth factor I level was lower in GHD than in both GHS and control subjects. Both before and 2 yr after GH treatment was discontinued, serum concentrations of total cholesterol (C), low density lipoprotein C, and apolipoprotein B were higher in the GHD than in both GHS and control subjects. Serum concentrations of high density lipoprotein C decreased in the GHD group and increased in the other 2 study groups. The amount of total body and abdominal fat mass throughout the study and the increment in these masses were more marked in the GHD than in the GHS and control subjects when GH treatment was discontinued.The discontinuation of GH therapy in adolescents with severe GHD continuing into adulthood results over a period of 2 yr in the accumulation of important cardiovascular risk factors that are associated with GHD in adults.

Journal

Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and MetabolismOxford University Press

Published: Dec 1, 1999

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