Development of a Method for the Determination of Bisphenol A at Trace Concentrations in Human Blood and Urine and Elucidation of Factors Influencing Method Accuracy and Sensitivity

Development of a Method for the Determination of Bisphenol A at Trace Concentrations in Human... Bisphenol A (BPA) is an industrial chemical used to make polymers including some used in food contact applications. Virtually complete presystemic clearance of orally administered BPA occurs in humans by metabolism to BPA-glucuronide (BPA-G), but some biomonitoring studies report low concentrations of free (parent) BPA in human blood and urine. Trace contamination of BPA from exogenous sources or hydrolysis of BPA-G to free BPA, either during or after biomonitoring specimen collection, may have contributed to the reported concentrations of free BPA. An analytical method for the determination of free BPA in human blood and urine was developed and validated in two independent laboratories, using the latest generation of high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry instrumentation to ensure the desired high sensitivity and selectivity. The method was designed to account for and/or eliminate background contamination from all sources and demonstrated that contamination could occur from devices used for specimen collection or storage, as well as other sources. The method employed an internal standard (BPA-d8) and demonstrated accuracy and reproducibility in both matrices fortified with BPA or a surrogate analyte (13C-BPA) at a low quantitation limit (0.1–0.2 ng/mL). For validation, five replicate samples were analyzed to evaluate reproducibility. Importantly, it was demonstrated that the conditions of the method did not result in the hydrolysis of BPA-G to free BPA, another possible source of error in BPA analysis. Application of the principles defined by this method will be critical to assure valid analytical results in any future biomonitoring studies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Analytical Toxicology Oxford University Press

Development of a Method for the Determination of Bisphenol A at Trace Concentrations in Human Blood and Urine and Elucidation of Factors Influencing Method Accuracy and Sensitivity

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Abstract

Bisphenol A (BPA) is an industrial chemical used to make polymers including some used in food contact applications. Virtually complete presystemic clearance of orally administered BPA occurs in humans by metabolism to BPA-glucuronide (BPA-G), but some biomonitoring studies report low concentrations of free (parent) BPA in human blood and urine. Trace contamination of BPA from exogenous sources or hydrolysis of BPA-G to free BPA, either during or after biomonitoring specimen collection, may have contributed to the reported concentrations of free BPA. An analytical method for the determination of free BPA in human blood and urine was developed and validated in two independent laboratories, using the latest generation of high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry instrumentation to ensure the desired high sensitivity and selectivity. The method was designed to account for and/or eliminate background contamination from all sources and demonstrated that contamination could occur from devices used for specimen collection or storage, as well as other sources. The method employed an internal standard (BPA-d8) and demonstrated accuracy and reproducibility in both matrices fortified with BPA or a surrogate analyte (13C-BPA) at a low quantitation limit (0.1–0.2 ng/mL). For validation, five replicate samples were analyzed to evaluate reproducibility. Importantly, it was demonstrated that the conditions of the method did not result in the hydrolysis of BPA-G to free BPA, another possible source of error in BPA analysis. Application of the principles defined by this method will be critical to assure valid analytical results in any future biomonitoring studies.

Journal

Journal of Analytical ToxicologyOxford University Press

Published: Jul 1, 2010

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