Defining Virtual Reality: Dimensions Determining Telepresence

Defining Virtual Reality: Dimensions Determining Telepresence paper presumes broad definitions of technology and media, such as those given by Ikniger (1986), who defines technology as “any intentional extension of a natural process, that is, processing o f matter, energy, and information that characterizes all living systems” (p. 91, and McLuhan (l964), who defines a medium as any “extension of man” (p. 21). See Nass and Mason (1990) for an in-depth discussion of the practical and (cont.) .Jonathan Steuer is a doctoral student in the Department of Communication at Stanford University, Stanford, California. The author wishes to express his gratitude to Clifford Nass for his invaluable assistance with this paper. Thanks also to Henry Breitrose, Benjamin Detenber, Gens Johnson, Shari Levine, Matthew Lombard, Geetu Melwani, Dave Voelker, and many others who read and commented on various drafts of this paper. Their insightful and thoughtprovoking comments were very much appreciated. Finally, thanks to Byron Reeves, whose interest in the idea o f “being there” helped to motivate this discussion. Copyright 0 1992 Journal of Communication 42(4), Autumn. 0021-9916/92/$0.0+ .05 JOU rnal of’Cbmmunication, A U t U rnri 1992 VR,” depending o n whether it includes a minimal corpus of particular machines. Second, such a definition provides http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Communication Oxford University Press

Defining Virtual Reality: Dimensions Determining Telepresence

Journal of Communication, Volume 42 (4) – Dec 1, 1992

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0021-9916
eISSN
1460-2466
DOI
10.1111/j.1460-2466.1992.tb00812.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

paper presumes broad definitions of technology and media, such as those given by Ikniger (1986), who defines technology as “any intentional extension of a natural process, that is, processing o f matter, energy, and information that characterizes all living systems” (p. 91, and McLuhan (l964), who defines a medium as any “extension of man” (p. 21). See Nass and Mason (1990) for an in-depth discussion of the practical and (cont.) .Jonathan Steuer is a doctoral student in the Department of Communication at Stanford University, Stanford, California. The author wishes to express his gratitude to Clifford Nass for his invaluable assistance with this paper. Thanks also to Henry Breitrose, Benjamin Detenber, Gens Johnson, Shari Levine, Matthew Lombard, Geetu Melwani, Dave Voelker, and many others who read and commented on various drafts of this paper. Their insightful and thoughtprovoking comments were very much appreciated. Finally, thanks to Byron Reeves, whose interest in the idea o f “being there” helped to motivate this discussion. Copyright 0 1992 Journal of Communication 42(4), Autumn. 0021-9916/92/$0.0+ .05 JOU rnal of’Cbmmunication, A U t U rnri 1992 VR,” depending o n whether it includes a minimal corpus of particular machines. Second, such a definition provides

Journal

Journal of CommunicationOxford University Press

Published: Dec 1, 1992

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