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Consumer Reactions to Product Failure: An Attributional Approach

Consumer Reactions to Product Failure: An Attributional Approach Abstract Attribution theory provides the framework for predicting consumer responses to product failures. Study 1 surveyed reasons for and reactions to product failure and Study 2 manipulated reasons in an experiment. Reasons for product failure influenced reactions such as desiring a refund or an exchange for the product, perceiving that an apology is owed the consumer, and wanting to hurt the firm's business. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes * Valerie S. Folkes is Visiting Assistant Professor of Marketing at the Graduate School of Management, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024. The author gratefully acknowledges the help of Mary Curren in conducting this research, and Melvyn Menezes for serving as a judge. Bernard Weiner's comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript are greatly appreciated. © JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Consumer Research Oxford University Press

Consumer Reactions to Product Failure: An Attributional Approach

Journal of Consumer Research , Volume 10 (4) – Mar 1, 1984

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References (14)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH
ISSN
0093-5301
eISSN
1537-5277
DOI
10.1086/208978
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Attribution theory provides the framework for predicting consumer responses to product failures. Study 1 surveyed reasons for and reactions to product failure and Study 2 manipulated reasons in an experiment. Reasons for product failure influenced reactions such as desiring a refund or an exchange for the product, perceiving that an apology is owed the consumer, and wanting to hurt the firm's business. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes * Valerie S. Folkes is Visiting Assistant Professor of Marketing at the Graduate School of Management, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024. The author gratefully acknowledges the help of Mary Curren in conducting this research, and Melvyn Menezes for serving as a judge. Bernard Weiner's comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript are greatly appreciated. © JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH

Journal

Journal of Consumer ResearchOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1984

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