Colonization in metapopulations: a review of theory and observations

Colonization in metapopulations: a review of theory and observations In metapopulation dynamics turnover of populations in isolated patches may be frequent. Regional survival of a species in such a system with frequent extinctions hinges on its colonization ability. Colonization is more than just dispersal; when a propagule reaches a new patch it faces higher extinction probabilities than does an established population. Extinction models as well as empirical data suggest that a large propagule with a potential for rapid increase in a varying environment, or with a low mortality rate in an environment perceived as constant, has a higher probability of successful colonization. Large variation in population size when it is still small increases the risk of failure. Factors introducing such variation are demographic stochasticity and environmental variation. It is hard to single out demographic traits that ensure good colonizing ability, since colonization can be achieved in many different ways, but generalists and species with self‐fertilization seem to be superior. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Journal of the Linnean Society Oxford University Press

Colonization in metapopulations: a review of theory and observations

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0024-4066
eISSN
1095-8312
DOI
10.1111/j.1095-8312.1991.tb00554.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In metapopulation dynamics turnover of populations in isolated patches may be frequent. Regional survival of a species in such a system with frequent extinctions hinges on its colonization ability. Colonization is more than just dispersal; when a propagule reaches a new patch it faces higher extinction probabilities than does an established population. Extinction models as well as empirical data suggest that a large propagule with a potential for rapid increase in a varying environment, or with a low mortality rate in an environment perceived as constant, has a higher probability of successful colonization. Large variation in population size when it is still small increases the risk of failure. Factors introducing such variation are demographic stochasticity and environmental variation. It is hard to single out demographic traits that ensure good colonizing ability, since colonization can be achieved in many different ways, but generalists and species with self‐fertilization seem to be superior.

Journal

Biological Journal of the Linnean SocietyOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1991

References

  • Interspecific competition in metapopulations
    BENGTSSON, BENGTSSON
  • Conservation lessons from long‐term studies of checkerspot butterflies
    EHRLICH, EHRLICH; MURPHY, MURPHY
  • Spatial structure and population extinction: a study with Drosophila flies
    FORNEY, FORNEY; GILPIN, GILPIN
  • Consequences of insular population structure: distribution and extinction of spruce grouse populations
    FRITZ, FRITZ
  • How do any species persist? Lessons for conservation biology
    GOODMAN, GOODMAN
  • Single‐species metapopulation dynamics: concepts, models and observations
    HANSKI, HANSKI
  • Metapopulation dynamics: brief history and conceptual domain
    HANSKI, HANSKI; GILPIN, GILPIN
  • Dispersal and connectivity in metapopulations
    HANSSON, HANSSON
  • The evolution of inbreeding in plants
    JAIN, JAIN
  • Corridors in real landscapes: a reply to Simberloff and Cox
    NOSS, NOSS
  • Are inbreeders better colonizers
    PRICE, PRICE; JAIN, JAIN
  • Criteria for the identification of potential colonizers
    SAFRIEL, SAFRIEL; RITTE, RITTE
  • The contribution of population and community biology to conservation science
    SIMBERLOFF, SIMBERLOFF
  • Consequences and costs of conservation corridors
    SIMBERLOFF, SIMBERLOFF; COX, COX

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