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Central and Peripheral Routes to Advertising Effectiveness: The Moderating Role of Involvement

Central and Peripheral Routes to Advertising Effectiveness: The Moderating Role of Involvement Abstract Undergraduates expressed their attitudes about a product after being exposed to a magazine ad under conditions of either high or low product involvement. The ad contained either strong or weak arguments for the product and featured either prominent sports celebrities or average citizens as endorsers. The manipulation of argument quality had a greater impact on attitudes under high than low involvement, but the manipulation of product endorser had a greater impact under low than high involvement. These results are consistent with the view that there are two relatively distinct routes to persuasion. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes * Richard E. Petty is Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211. John T. Cacioppo is Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242. David Schumann is a graduate student in psychology at the University of Missouri. The authors are grateful to Rob Greene, Nancy Stabler, Trez Bayer, Karen King, Brian Kinkade, Edith Meredith, Tim Nash, and Todd Nixon for their considerable help in conducting the experiment reported here, and to the University of Missouri Research Council for grant support. © JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Consumer Research Oxford University Press

Central and Peripheral Routes to Advertising Effectiveness: The Moderating Role of Involvement

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References (72)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH
ISSN
0093-5301
eISSN
1537-5277
DOI
10.1086/208954
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Undergraduates expressed their attitudes about a product after being exposed to a magazine ad under conditions of either high or low product involvement. The ad contained either strong or weak arguments for the product and featured either prominent sports celebrities or average citizens as endorsers. The manipulation of argument quality had a greater impact on attitudes under high than low involvement, but the manipulation of product endorser had a greater impact under low than high involvement. These results are consistent with the view that there are two relatively distinct routes to persuasion. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes * Richard E. Petty is Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211. John T. Cacioppo is Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242. David Schumann is a graduate student in psychology at the University of Missouri. The authors are grateful to Rob Greene, Nancy Stabler, Trez Bayer, Karen King, Brian Kinkade, Edith Meredith, Tim Nash, and Todd Nixon for their considerable help in conducting the experiment reported here, and to the University of Missouri Research Council for grant support. © JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH

Journal

Journal of Consumer ResearchOxford University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1983

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