Brief Report: Quality of Life in Overweight Youth—The Role of Multiple Informants and Perceived Social Support

Brief Report: Quality of Life in Overweight Youth—The Role of Multiple Informants and Perceived... Objective To examine the impact of overweight status on pediatric quality of life (QOL). Method This correlational study examined the relationship between weight, social support, race, informant, and QOL in a sample of 107 clinically overweight youth, ages 12 to 17 years. Results Regression analysis did not support the relation between QOL and weight. Social support was a significant predictor of youth reports of overall QOL. Males reported better physical QOL than females by both parent and youth report. Paired-samples t-tests supported a discrepancy between child and parent-proxy reports of QOL; parents reported significantly worse QOL than their children across many dimensions. Analysis of variance found no significant difference between Caucasian and African American youth's QOL. Conclusions These results highlighted the importance of considering informant, gender, and the impact of social support when measuring QOL in clinically overweight pediatric populations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pediatric Psychology Oxford University Press

Brief Report: Quality of Life in Overweight Youth—The Role of Multiple Informants and Perceived Social Support

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/brief-report-quality-of-life-in-overweight-youth-the-role-of-multiple-n0542W2p0T
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0146-8693
eISSN
1465-735X
DOI
10.1093/jpepsy/jsm026
pmid
17488775
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective To examine the impact of overweight status on pediatric quality of life (QOL). Method This correlational study examined the relationship between weight, social support, race, informant, and QOL in a sample of 107 clinically overweight youth, ages 12 to 17 years. Results Regression analysis did not support the relation between QOL and weight. Social support was a significant predictor of youth reports of overall QOL. Males reported better physical QOL than females by both parent and youth report. Paired-samples t-tests supported a discrepancy between child and parent-proxy reports of QOL; parents reported significantly worse QOL than their children across many dimensions. Analysis of variance found no significant difference between Caucasian and African American youth's QOL. Conclusions These results highlighted the importance of considering informant, gender, and the impact of social support when measuring QOL in clinically overweight pediatric populations.

Journal

Journal of Pediatric PsychologyOxford University Press

Published: Aug 8, 2007

Keywords: informant overweight quality of life social support

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off