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Bibliographic Enterprise and the Digital Age: Charles Evans and the Making of Early American Literature

Bibliographic Enterprise and the Digital Age: Charles Evans and the Making of Early American... Bibliographic Enterprise and the Digital Age: Charles Evans and the Making of Early American Literature Molly O’Hagan Hardy* At the end of the nineteenth century, Charles Evans set out to compile the first comprehensive bibliography of printed texts up to 1820 in what would become the US. A librarian who grew up around American books, Evans had a love for such artifacts of early national history that carried him through this arduous task, as did his drive to enumerate these imprints into a single set of volumes. In a speech delivered in October 1921 at the American Antiquarian Society’s (AAS) annual meeting, Evans described in vivid detail his affective relationship to his work, and in so doing, situated himself in the mores that brought this group of men together. Specifically, he identified himself with antiquarianism, a lineage of practice im- ported from England but made local by the nation’s first collectors of literature printed in the US. His bibliographic work drew on a tradition dating back to the nation’s founding while also setting the course for the ways in which this corpus would make itself available to the next century of students and scholars of the period. In the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Literary History Oxford University Press

Bibliographic Enterprise and the Digital Age: Charles Evans and the Making of Early American Literature

American Literary History , Volume 29 (2) – May 1, 2017

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0896-7148
eISSN
1468-4365
DOI
10.1093/alh/ajx002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Bibliographic Enterprise and the Digital Age: Charles Evans and the Making of Early American Literature Molly O’Hagan Hardy* At the end of the nineteenth century, Charles Evans set out to compile the first comprehensive bibliography of printed texts up to 1820 in what would become the US. A librarian who grew up around American books, Evans had a love for such artifacts of early national history that carried him through this arduous task, as did his drive to enumerate these imprints into a single set of volumes. In a speech delivered in October 1921 at the American Antiquarian Society’s (AAS) annual meeting, Evans described in vivid detail his affective relationship to his work, and in so doing, situated himself in the mores that brought this group of men together. Specifically, he identified himself with antiquarianism, a lineage of practice im- ported from England but made local by the nation’s first collectors of literature printed in the US. His bibliographic work drew on a tradition dating back to the nation’s founding while also setting the course for the ways in which this corpus would make itself available to the next century of students and scholars of the period. In the

Journal

American Literary HistoryOxford University Press

Published: May 1, 2017

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