ATTRIBUTIONAL CONFIDENCE IN LOW‐ AND HIGH‐CONTEXT CULTURES

ATTRIBUTIONAL CONFIDENCE IN LOW‐ AND HIGH‐CONTEXT CULTURES Current measures of attribulional confidence were generated to account for uncertainty reduction in the United States but have been used in tests of the theory in other cultures. This procedure may yield inappropriate measurement in other cultures. Based on a review of uncertainty reduction in high‐context cultures, items were generated to tap attribulional confidence in these cultures. The new items were integrated with Clatterbuck's (1979) CL7 scale and administered to samples in Japan and the United States. A confirmatory factor analysis of the resulting data revealed two unique factors ofattributional confidence. The amount of variances and covariances accounted for by the two‐factor model was over 90% in both samples. Scores on both factors were influenced by culture and stage of relationship development. Correlations between other variables (e.g, shared networks, frequency of communication) and the two dimensions also differed across cultures. It was concluded that the eight‐item scale provides a derived etic measure of attributional confidence that is applicable in both low‐ and high‐context cultures. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Communication Research Oxford University Press

ATTRIBUTIONAL CONFIDENCE IN LOW‐ AND HIGH‐CONTEXT CULTURES

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0360-3989
eISSN
1468-2958
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1468-2958.1986.tb00090.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Current measures of attribulional confidence were generated to account for uncertainty reduction in the United States but have been used in tests of the theory in other cultures. This procedure may yield inappropriate measurement in other cultures. Based on a review of uncertainty reduction in high‐context cultures, items were generated to tap attribulional confidence in these cultures. The new items were integrated with Clatterbuck's (1979) CL7 scale and administered to samples in Japan and the United States. A confirmatory factor analysis of the resulting data revealed two unique factors ofattributional confidence. The amount of variances and covariances accounted for by the two‐factor model was over 90% in both samples. Scores on both factors were influenced by culture and stage of relationship development. Correlations between other variables (e.g, shared networks, frequency of communication) and the two dimensions also differed across cultures. It was concluded that the eight‐item scale provides a derived etic measure of attributional confidence that is applicable in both low‐ and high‐context cultures.

Journal

Human Communication ResearchOxford University Press

Published: Jun 1, 1986

References

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