Association Between Inflammatory Components and Physical Function in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study: A Principal Component Analysis Approach

Association Between Inflammatory Components and Physical Function in the Health, Aging, and Body... BackgroundIn older adults, studies demonstrate an inverse relationship between physical function and individual inflammatory biomarkers. Given that the inflammatory response is a complex system, a combination of biomarkers may increase the strength and consistency of these associations. This study uses principal component analysis to identify inflammatory component(s) and evaluates associations between the identified component(s) and measures of physical function.MethodsPrincipal component analysis with a varimax rotation was used to identify two components from eight inflammatory biomarkers measured in 1,269 older persons. The study sample is a subset of the Health, Aging, and Body Composition study.ResultsThe two components explained 56% of the total variance in the data (34%, component 1 and 22%, component 2). Five markers (tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-], sTNFRI, sTNFRII, interleukin [IL]-6sR, IL-2sR) loaded highest on the first component (TNF- related), whereas three markers (C-reactive protein [CRP], IL-6, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) loaded highest on the second component (CRP related). After adjusting for age, sex, race, site, sampling indicator, total lean and fat mass, physical activity, smoking, and anti-inflammatory drug use, knee strength and a physical performance battery score were inversely related to the TNF--related component, but not to the CRP-related component (knee strength: ^TNF 2.71, p .002; ^CRP 0.88, p .325; physical performance battery score: ^TNF 0.05, p < .001; ^CRP 0.02, p .171). Both components were positively associated with 400-m walk time, inversely associated with grip strength, and not associated with 20-m walking speed.ConclusionsAt least two inflammatory components can be identified in an older population, and these components have inconsistent associations with different aspects of physical performance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical Sciences Oxford University Press

Association Between Inflammatory Components and Physical Function in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study: A Principal Component Analysis Approach

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
The Author 2009. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org.
Subject
Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences
ISSN
1079-5006
eISSN
1758-535X
D.O.I.
10.1093/gerona/glp005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BackgroundIn older adults, studies demonstrate an inverse relationship between physical function and individual inflammatory biomarkers. Given that the inflammatory response is a complex system, a combination of biomarkers may increase the strength and consistency of these associations. This study uses principal component analysis to identify inflammatory component(s) and evaluates associations between the identified component(s) and measures of physical function.MethodsPrincipal component analysis with a varimax rotation was used to identify two components from eight inflammatory biomarkers measured in 1,269 older persons. The study sample is a subset of the Health, Aging, and Body Composition study.ResultsThe two components explained 56% of the total variance in the data (34%, component 1 and 22%, component 2). Five markers (tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-], sTNFRI, sTNFRII, interleukin [IL]-6sR, IL-2sR) loaded highest on the first component (TNF- related), whereas three markers (C-reactive protein [CRP], IL-6, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) loaded highest on the second component (CRP related). After adjusting for age, sex, race, site, sampling indicator, total lean and fat mass, physical activity, smoking, and anti-inflammatory drug use, knee strength and a physical performance battery score were inversely related to the TNF--related component, but not to the CRP-related component (knee strength: ^TNF 2.71, p .002; ^CRP 0.88, p .325; physical performance battery score: ^TNF 0.05, p < .001; ^CRP 0.02, p .171). Both components were positively associated with 400-m walk time, inversely associated with grip strength, and not associated with 20-m walking speed.ConclusionsAt least two inflammatory components can be identified in an older population, and these components have inconsistent associations with different aspects of physical performance.

Journal

The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical SciencesOxford University Press

Published: Feb 19, 2009

Keywords: Inflammation Physical function Aging Principal component analysis

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