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APHID CONTROL IN HEAD LETTUCE, SPRING 2002

APHID CONTROL IN HEAD LETTUCE, SPRING 2002 (E33) LETTUCE (HEAD): Lactuca sativa L., 'Winterset' John C. Palumbo University of Arizona Department of Entomology Yuma Agricultural Center 6425 W. 8th St. Yuma, Arizona 85364 Tel: (928) 782-3836 Fax: (928) 782-1940 jpalumbo@ag.arizona.edu Lettuce aphid: Nasonovia ribis-nigri (Mosley) Foxglove aphid: Aulacorthum solani (Kaltenbach) The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of several neonicotinoid insecticides against lettuce and foxglove aphid, two new pests of lettuce in desert growing area of southwestern US. Lettuce was direct seeded on 14 Nov at the Yuma Valley Agricultural Center, Yuma, AZ, into double-row beds on 42-inch centers. Stand establishment was achieved using overhead sprinkler irrigation, and furrow irrigated thereafter. Plots were four-beds wide by 40-ft long and bordered by two untreated beds. Each treatment was replicated four times and arranged in a randomized complete block design. At-planting, soil applications were made just prior to direct seeding by placing the insecticide 1.5 inches below the seedline in a total volume of 20 gpa. Sidedress applications were made similarly on 18 Dec (1st side dress) and Feb 5 (2nd side dress) by placing the material on the shoulder of the bed about 4" from the plant and 3" below the soil surface. Foliar sprays were applied on 6 and 20 Feb with a CO backpack boom sprayer operated at 50 psi and 26.5 gpa. A directed spray (~75% band, with rate adjusted for band) was delivered through three nozzles (TX-18) per bed. Insect data were collected only from the inner two beds of each plot beginning on 2 Jan and continuing through harvest. On each sample date 10 plants were randomly selected in each plot and thoroughly examined for the presence of apterous aphids. Data were analyzed as a one-way ANOVA using a protected LSD F-test to distinguish treatment mean differences. Aphid populations were light to moderate during the study and did not build up to significant number until mid-Feb. Among the neonicotionoids, the soil applied application of Admire and Platinum provided significant control of aphids at harvest (Table 1.). In contrast, aphid number in both the soil applied and foliar dinotefuron treatments were not significantly different from the untreated check at harvest, and only the high rate of Asaail appeared to provide significant control. This study demonstrates the apparent variability among neonicotinoids in lettuce and foxglove aphid control on head lettuce. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arthropod Management Tests Oxford University Press

APHID CONTROL IN HEAD LETTUCE, SPRING 2002

Arthropod Management Tests , Volume 28 (1) – Jan 1, 2003

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Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
eISSN
2155-9856
DOI
10.1093/amt/28.1.E33
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Abstract

(E33) LETTUCE (HEAD): Lactuca sativa L., 'Winterset' John C. Palumbo University of Arizona Department of Entomology Yuma Agricultural Center 6425 W. 8th St. Yuma, Arizona 85364 Tel: (928) 782-3836 Fax: (928) 782-1940 jpalumbo@ag.arizona.edu Lettuce aphid: Nasonovia ribis-nigri (Mosley) Foxglove aphid: Aulacorthum solani (Kaltenbach) The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of several neonicotinoid insecticides against lettuce and foxglove aphid, two new pests of lettuce in desert growing area of southwestern US. Lettuce was direct seeded on 14 Nov at the Yuma Valley Agricultural Center, Yuma, AZ, into double-row beds on 42-inch centers. Stand establishment was achieved using overhead sprinkler irrigation, and furrow irrigated thereafter. Plots were four-beds wide by 40-ft long and bordered by two untreated beds. Each treatment was replicated four times and arranged in a randomized complete block design. At-planting, soil applications were made just prior to direct seeding by placing the insecticide 1.5 inches below the seedline in a total volume of 20 gpa. Sidedress applications were made similarly on 18 Dec (1st side dress) and Feb 5 (2nd side dress) by placing the material on the shoulder of the bed about 4" from the plant and 3" below the soil surface. Foliar sprays were applied on 6 and 20 Feb with a CO backpack boom sprayer operated at 50 psi and 26.5 gpa. A directed spray (~75% band, with rate adjusted for band) was delivered through three nozzles (TX-18) per bed. Insect data were collected only from the inner two beds of each plot beginning on 2 Jan and continuing through harvest. On each sample date 10 plants were randomly selected in each plot and thoroughly examined for the presence of apterous aphids. Data were analyzed as a one-way ANOVA using a protected LSD F-test to distinguish treatment mean differences. Aphid populations were light to moderate during the study and did not build up to significant number until mid-Feb. Among the neonicotionoids, the soil applied application of Admire and Platinum provided significant control of aphids at harvest (Table 1.). In contrast, aphid number in both the soil applied and foliar dinotefuron treatments were not significantly different from the untreated check at harvest, and only the high rate of Asaail appeared to provide significant control. This study demonstrates the apparent variability among neonicotinoids in lettuce and foxglove aphid control on head lettuce.

Journal

Arthropod Management TestsOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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