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A Special Section Disasters in the Twenty-First Century: Modern Destruction and Future Instruction

A Special Section Disasters in the Twenty-First Century: Modern Destruction and Future Instruction A Special Section Disasters in the Twenty-First Century: Modern Destruction and Future Instruction Editor David Brunsma, University of Missouri Co-Editor J. Steven Picou, University of South Alabama Sociologists are becoming increasingly aware of the changing nature of risk in late modernity and the shifting landscape of the sociological study of disasters. This increased “consciousness of catastrophe” is directly related to the empirical fact that the number of “natural” and “technological” disasters have increased substantially over the past 30 years. In the past eight years, some 422 disaster declarations have been issued in the United States alone – etching disasters as an important part of contemporary American experience (Bogues 2008). The number of people and communities affected by this most recent spate of catastrophic events reflects a global intensification of death and destruction that invites analytical and empirical application of a critical sociological imagination. While affecting society as a whole, these “focusing events,” or “destabilizing events,” have also had an impact on scholarly enterprises, shifting the attention of sociologists from more traditional areas of professional inquiry to the expansion and application of innovative concepts and methods to the study of disasters (Birkland 1997; Picou and Marshall 2007). This paradigm shift http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Forces Oxford University Press

A Special Section Disasters in the Twenty-First Century: Modern Destruction and Future Instruction

Social Forces , Volume 87 (2) – Dec 1, 2008

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References (33)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
Subject
Other Articles
ISSN
0037-7732
eISSN
1534-7605
DOI
10.1353/sof.0.0149
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A Special Section Disasters in the Twenty-First Century: Modern Destruction and Future Instruction Editor David Brunsma, University of Missouri Co-Editor J. Steven Picou, University of South Alabama Sociologists are becoming increasingly aware of the changing nature of risk in late modernity and the shifting landscape of the sociological study of disasters. This increased “consciousness of catastrophe” is directly related to the empirical fact that the number of “natural” and “technological” disasters have increased substantially over the past 30 years. In the past eight years, some 422 disaster declarations have been issued in the United States alone – etching disasters as an important part of contemporary American experience (Bogues 2008). The number of people and communities affected by this most recent spate of catastrophic events reflects a global intensification of death and destruction that invites analytical and empirical application of a critical sociological imagination. While affecting society as a whole, these “focusing events,” or “destabilizing events,” have also had an impact on scholarly enterprises, shifting the attention of sociologists from more traditional areas of professional inquiry to the expansion and application of innovative concepts and methods to the study of disasters (Birkland 1997; Picou and Marshall 2007). This paradigm shift

Journal

Social ForcesOxford University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2008

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