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A New History of German Literature . Ed. David E. Welbery. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press 2004. xviii + 1004 pp. £29.95. ISBN 0–674–01503–7

REVIEWS godfather (particularly in Imagism and Vorticism), and from considered analysis of not only his critical but also his poetical development. [doi: 10.1093/fmls/cqi328] National Identity in Russian Culture: An Introduction. Ed. Simon Franklin & Emma Widdis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. xv þ 240 pp. £45/$75. ISBN 0–521–83926–2. The editors present an extremely useful collection of essays on many aspects of our perceptions of ‘‘Russia’’, ‘‘Russian’’, ‘‘Russians’’ and ‘‘Russianness’’. The book is extremely clearly structured, something which helps considerably given the immensity of the task and ever-increasing range of the bibliography. As such, it is suitable for a wide readership, particularly students. After a general introduction by the editors, we have sections on ‘‘Identities in time and space’’, ‘‘Contrastive identities: ‘us’ and ‘them’ ’’, ‘‘ ‘Essential’ identities’’, and ‘‘Symbols of identity’’, the whole concluded by an Afterword, Notes, Selected further reading in English, and an Index. The editors themselves provide the two essays in the first section. Hubertus F. Jahn and Anthony Cross deal respectively with Russians on Russianness, and with Russians on foreigners. Franklin then returns to present identity and religion, and is joined by Marina Frolova-Walker on identity and music. Boris Gasparov discusses identity in language, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Forum For Modern Language Studies Oxford University Press

A New History of German Literature . Ed. David E. Welbery. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press 2004. xviii + 1004 pp. £29.95. ISBN 0–674–01503–7

Abstract

REVIEWS godfather (particularly in Imagism and Vorticism), and from considered analysis of not only his critical but also his poetical development. [doi: 10.1093/fmls/cqi328] National Identity in Russian Culture: An Introduction. Ed. Simon Franklin & Emma Widdis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. xv þ 240 pp. £45/$75. ISBN 0–521–83926–2. The editors present an extremely useful collection of essays on many aspects of our perceptions of ‘‘Russia’’, ‘‘Russian’’, ‘‘Russians’’ and ‘‘Russianness’’. The book is extremely clearly structured, something which helps considerably given the immensity of the task and ever-increasing range of the bibliography. As such, it is suitable for a wide readership, particularly students. After a general introduction by the editors, we have sections on ‘‘Identities in time and space’’, ‘‘Contrastive identities: ‘us’ and ‘them’ ’’, ‘‘ ‘Essential’ identities’’, and ‘‘Symbols of identity’’, the whole concluded by an Afterword, Notes, Selected further reading in English, and an Index. The editors themselves provide the two essays in the first section. Hubertus F. Jahn and Anthony Cross deal respectively with Russians on Russianness, and with Russians on foreigners. Franklin then returns to present identity and religion, and is joined by Marina Frolova-Walker on identity and music. Boris Gasparov discusses identity in language,
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