A Database for the ESA

A Database for the ESA Editorial PUBLISHER Richard T. O’Grady EDITOR IN CHIEF Timothy M. Beardsley BioScience SENIOR EDITOR American Institute of Biological Sciences Donna Daniels Verdier PRODUCTION MANAGER / ART DIRECTOR Herman Marshall PUBLICATIONS ASSISTANT Catherine Verdier Editors: Eye on Education: Susan Musante; Feature articles: Cathy Lundmark (features@aibs.org); Washington Watch: Adrienne Froelich Sponberg (publicpolicy@aibs.org). he Forum article that begins on page 360, “The Effectiveness of the Endangered Editorial Associate: Barbara J. Orton TSpecies Act: A Quantitative Analysis,” by Martin Taylor and colleagues, is partic- Editorial Board: Agriculture: Sonny Ramaswamy; Animal Behavior: Janice Moore; Animal Development: ularly timely, given the number of bills before Congress to amend the Endangered Paula Mabee; Botany: Gregory J. Anderson; Cell Species Act (ESA). Biology: Randy Wayne; Ecology: Scott Collins, Daniel Simberloff; Ecotoxicology: Judith S. Weis; Education: The article is an example of an encouraging trend in discussions of the ESA. Gordon E. Uno; Environmental Policy: Gordon Taylor and his colleagues provide an empirical analysis of several key elements of the Brown, J. Michael Scott; Genetics and Evolution: Martin Tracey; History and Philosophy: Richard M. act, including one of its more controversial provisions, the designation of critical habi- Burian; Invertebrate Biology: Kirk Fitzhugh; Landscape tat. The ESA defines the term critical habitat as the area where the “physical or bio- Ecology: Monica Turner; Microbiology: Edna S. Kaneshiro; Molecular Biology: David Hillis; logical features...essential to the conservation of the species” are located. The act Neurobiology: Cole Gilbert; Plant Development: does not designate any habitat, leaving that task to the federal wildlife agency. The des- Cynthia S. Jones; Policy Forum: Eric A. Fischer; ignation is to be based on the best scientific data available, together with an analysis Population Biology: Ben Pierce; Professional Biologist: Jean Wyld; Sensing and Computation: Geoffrey M. of the economic impact of the designation. Although individuals on all sides of the Henebry; Statistics: E. Barry Moser; Vertebrate Biology: issue have been willing to offer up judgments on the value of critical habitat, they have Harvey B. Lillywhite. Editorial Correspondence: 1444 I Street, NW, often done so without supporting empirical data. Anecdote, rhetoric, and even logic Suite 200, Washington, DC 20005; 202-628-1500; fax: are poor substitutes for data. Lack of informed discussion neither builds trust nor casts 202-628-1509; e-mail: bioscience@aibs.org. Instructions for preparing a manuscript for BioScience can be found light on the issue at hand. Taylor and colleagues shed some light; although their at www.aibs.org/bioscience/resources/Info_for_contribs. study establishes a correlation rather than causation, it does suggest that critical habi- pdf. tat makes a positive difference in the conservation status of at-risk species. Advertising: Carrie Hartin, Network Publications, Inc., Executive Plaza 1, 11350 McCormick Road, Suite This article also highlights a related concern. Empirical analysis is dependent upon 900, Hunt Valley, MD 21031; 410-584-1972; fax: 410- data. Taylor and colleagues were able to address the importance of critical habitat 584-1998; e-mail: bioscience@networkpub.com. BioScience (ISSN 0006-3568) is published monthly only after amassing a comprehensive database drawn from diverse sources. Other by the American Institute of Biological Sciences. To researchers who have sought to evaluate the act’s accomplishments have also faced this subscribe, call 1-800-992-2427, ext. 29. Individual membership: sustaining, $90/yr; individual, $70/yr; challenge. The difficulty is that no single ESA database contains the full record of agency family, $90/yr (includes $36 for BioScience); emeritus, actions regarding listing, reclassification, consultations, and other decisions pursuant $50/yr; K–12 teacher/administrator, $45/yr (includes $22 for BioScience); graduate and postdoctoral stu- to the act. Although the Web sites maintained by the National Marine Fisheries dents, $40/yr (includes $21 for BioScience); undergrad- Service and the US Fish and Wildlife Service are useful, they could be even more so uate and K–12 students, $20/yr (includes $15 for BioScience); lifetime, $1400 (one-time fee). if they were fully consistent with the record from the Federal Register as well as with Institutional subscriptions: domestic, $280/yr; foreign, one another. $336/yr. Single copies: $14 plus shipping and handling A comprehensive database that contained a complete record of actions under the for up to 20 copies; volume discounts available for more than 20 (call 1-800-992-2427, ext. 29). Sub- ESA would promote independent analysis by diverse parties and would improve scription renewal month is shown in the four-digit discourse by complementing rhetoric with facts. The result would be better-informed year–month code in the upper right corner of the mailing label. policymakers, agency personnel, and members of the general public, as well as a © 2005 American Institute of Biological Sciences. All more transparent and efficient ESA implementation process. rights reserved. Periodical postage paid at Washington, DC, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to BioScience Circulation, AIBS, 1313 Dolley Madison Blvd., J. MICHAEL SCOTT Suite 402, McLean, VA 22101. Printed in USA. AIBS Research Biologist, US Geological Survey authorizes photocopying for internal or personal Department of Fish and Wildlife use, provided the appropriate fee is paid directly to the Copyright Clearance Center, 222 Rosewood University of Idaho Drive, Danvers, MA 01923; phone: 978-750-8400; Moscow, ID 83844 fax: 978-750-4744; Web site: www.copyright.com. To photocopy articles for classroom use, request autho- rization, subject to conditions thereof, from the Academic Permissions Service at CCC. Each copy must DALE D. GOBLE say “© [year] by the American Institute of Biological College of Law Sciences.” Statements and opinions expressed in University of Idaho BioScience are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the official positions of the American Moscow, ID 83844 Institute of Biological Sciences, the editors, the publish- er, or the institutions with which the authors are affili- ated. The editors, publisher, and AIBS disclaim any responsibility or liability for such material. April 2005 / Vol. 55 No. 4 • BioScience 299 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BioScience Oxford University Press

A Database for the ESA

BioScience, Volume 55 (4) – Apr 1, 2005

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Oxford University Press
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© Published by Oxford University Press.
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Departments
ISSN
0006-3568
eISSN
1525-3244
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10.1641/0006-3568(2005)055[0299:ADFTE]2.0.CO;2
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Abstract

Editorial PUBLISHER Richard T. O’Grady EDITOR IN CHIEF Timothy M. Beardsley BioScience SENIOR EDITOR American Institute of Biological Sciences Donna Daniels Verdier PRODUCTION MANAGER / ART DIRECTOR Herman Marshall PUBLICATIONS ASSISTANT Catherine Verdier Editors: Eye on Education: Susan Musante; Feature articles: Cathy Lundmark (features@aibs.org); Washington Watch: Adrienne Froelich Sponberg (publicpolicy@aibs.org). he Forum article that begins on page 360, “The Effectiveness of the Endangered Editorial Associate: Barbara J. Orton TSpecies Act: A Quantitative Analysis,” by Martin Taylor and colleagues, is partic- Editorial Board: Agriculture: Sonny Ramaswamy; Animal Behavior: Janice Moore; Animal Development: ularly timely, given the number of bills before Congress to amend the Endangered Paula Mabee; Botany: Gregory J. Anderson; Cell Species Act (ESA). Biology: Randy Wayne; Ecology: Scott Collins, Daniel Simberloff; Ecotoxicology: Judith S. Weis; Education: The article is an example of an encouraging trend in discussions of the ESA. Gordon E. Uno; Environmental Policy: Gordon Taylor and his colleagues provide an empirical analysis of several key elements of the Brown, J. Michael Scott; Genetics and Evolution: Martin Tracey; History and Philosophy: Richard M. act, including one of its more controversial provisions, the designation of critical habi- Burian; Invertebrate Biology: Kirk Fitzhugh; Landscape tat. The ESA defines the term critical habitat as the area where the “physical or bio- Ecology: Monica Turner; Microbiology: Edna S. Kaneshiro; Molecular Biology: David Hillis; logical features...essential to the conservation of the species” are located. The act Neurobiology: Cole Gilbert; Plant Development: does not designate any habitat, leaving that task to the federal wildlife agency. The des- Cynthia S. Jones; Policy Forum: Eric A. Fischer; ignation is to be based on the best scientific data available, together with an analysis Population Biology: Ben Pierce; Professional Biologist: Jean Wyld; Sensing and Computation: Geoffrey M. of the economic impact of the designation. Although individuals on all sides of the Henebry; Statistics: E. Barry Moser; Vertebrate Biology: issue have been willing to offer up judgments on the value of critical habitat, they have Harvey B. Lillywhite. Editorial Correspondence: 1444 I Street, NW, often done so without supporting empirical data. Anecdote, rhetoric, and even logic Suite 200, Washington, DC 20005; 202-628-1500; fax: are poor substitutes for data. Lack of informed discussion neither builds trust nor casts 202-628-1509; e-mail: bioscience@aibs.org. Instructions for preparing a manuscript for BioScience can be found light on the issue at hand. Taylor and colleagues shed some light; although their at www.aibs.org/bioscience/resources/Info_for_contribs. study establishes a correlation rather than causation, it does suggest that critical habi- pdf. tat makes a positive difference in the conservation status of at-risk species. Advertising: Carrie Hartin, Network Publications, Inc., Executive Plaza 1, 11350 McCormick Road, Suite This article also highlights a related concern. Empirical analysis is dependent upon 900, Hunt Valley, MD 21031; 410-584-1972; fax: 410- data. Taylor and colleagues were able to address the importance of critical habitat 584-1998; e-mail: bioscience@networkpub.com. BioScience (ISSN 0006-3568) is published monthly only after amassing a comprehensive database drawn from diverse sources. Other by the American Institute of Biological Sciences. To researchers who have sought to evaluate the act’s accomplishments have also faced this subscribe, call 1-800-992-2427, ext. 29. Individual membership: sustaining, $90/yr; individual, $70/yr; challenge. The difficulty is that no single ESA database contains the full record of agency family, $90/yr (includes $36 for BioScience); emeritus, actions regarding listing, reclassification, consultations, and other decisions pursuant $50/yr; K–12 teacher/administrator, $45/yr (includes $22 for BioScience); graduate and postdoctoral stu- to the act. Although the Web sites maintained by the National Marine Fisheries dents, $40/yr (includes $21 for BioScience); undergrad- Service and the US Fish and Wildlife Service are useful, they could be even more so uate and K–12 students, $20/yr (includes $15 for BioScience); lifetime, $1400 (one-time fee). if they were fully consistent with the record from the Federal Register as well as with Institutional subscriptions: domestic, $280/yr; foreign, one another. $336/yr. Single copies: $14 plus shipping and handling A comprehensive database that contained a complete record of actions under the for up to 20 copies; volume discounts available for more than 20 (call 1-800-992-2427, ext. 29). Sub- ESA would promote independent analysis by diverse parties and would improve scription renewal month is shown in the four-digit discourse by complementing rhetoric with facts. The result would be better-informed year–month code in the upper right corner of the mailing label. policymakers, agency personnel, and members of the general public, as well as a © 2005 American Institute of Biological Sciences. All more transparent and efficient ESA implementation process. rights reserved. Periodical postage paid at Washington, DC, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to BioScience Circulation, AIBS, 1313 Dolley Madison Blvd., J. MICHAEL SCOTT Suite 402, McLean, VA 22101. Printed in USA. AIBS Research Biologist, US Geological Survey authorizes photocopying for internal or personal Department of Fish and Wildlife use, provided the appropriate fee is paid directly to the Copyright Clearance Center, 222 Rosewood University of Idaho Drive, Danvers, MA 01923; phone: 978-750-8400; Moscow, ID 83844 fax: 978-750-4744; Web site: www.copyright.com. To photocopy articles for classroom use, request autho- rization, subject to conditions thereof, from the Academic Permissions Service at CCC. Each copy must DALE D. GOBLE say “© [year] by the American Institute of Biological College of Law Sciences.” Statements and opinions expressed in University of Idaho BioScience are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the official positions of the American Moscow, ID 83844 Institute of Biological Sciences, the editors, the publish- er, or the institutions with which the authors are affili- ated. The editors, publisher, and AIBS disclaim any responsibility or liability for such material. April 2005 / Vol. 55 No. 4 • BioScience 299

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BioScienceOxford University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2005

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