You are what you get from your fungi: nitrogen stable isotope patterns in Epipactis species

You are what you get from your fungi: nitrogen stable isotope patterns in Epipactis species AbstractBackground and Aims Partially mycoheterotrophic plants are enriched in 13C and 15N compared to autotrophic plants. Here, it is hypothesized that the type of mycorrhizal fungi found in orchid roots is responsible for variation in 15N enrichment of leaf tissue in partially mycoheterotrophic orchids.Methods The genus Epipactis was used as a case study and carbon and nitrogen isotope abundances of eight Epipactis species, fungal sporocarps of four Tuber species and autotrophic references were measured. Mycorrhizal fungi were identified using molecular methods. Stable isotope data of six additional Epipactis taxa and ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic basidiomycetes were compiled from the literature.Key Results The 15N enrichment of Epipactis species varied between 3·2 ± 0·8 ‰ (E. gigantea; rhizoctonia-associated) and 24·6 ± 1·6 ‰ (E. neglecta; associated with ectomycorrhizal ascomycetes). Sporocarps of ectomycorrhizal ascomycetes (10·7 ± 2·2 ‰) were significantly more enriched in 15N than ectomycorrhizal (5·2 ± 4·0 ‰) and saprotrophic basidiomycetes (3·3 ± 2·1 ‰).Conclusions As hypothesized, it is suggested that the observed gradient in 15N enrichment of Epipactis species is strongly driven by 15N abundance of their mycorrhizal fungi; i.e. ɛ15N in Epipactis spp. associated with rhizoctonias < ɛ15N in Epipactis spp. with ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes < ɛ15N in Epipactis spp. with ectomycorrhizal ascomycetes and basidiomycetes < ɛ15N in Epipactis spp. with ectomycorrhizal ascomycetes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Botany Oxford University Press

You are what you get from your fungi: nitrogen stable isotope patterns in Epipactis species

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0305-7364
eISSN
1095-8290
D.O.I.
10.1093/aob/mcw265
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackground and Aims Partially mycoheterotrophic plants are enriched in 13C and 15N compared to autotrophic plants. Here, it is hypothesized that the type of mycorrhizal fungi found in orchid roots is responsible for variation in 15N enrichment of leaf tissue in partially mycoheterotrophic orchids.Methods The genus Epipactis was used as a case study and carbon and nitrogen isotope abundances of eight Epipactis species, fungal sporocarps of four Tuber species and autotrophic references were measured. Mycorrhizal fungi were identified using molecular methods. Stable isotope data of six additional Epipactis taxa and ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic basidiomycetes were compiled from the literature.Key Results The 15N enrichment of Epipactis species varied between 3·2 ± 0·8 ‰ (E. gigantea; rhizoctonia-associated) and 24·6 ± 1·6 ‰ (E. neglecta; associated with ectomycorrhizal ascomycetes). Sporocarps of ectomycorrhizal ascomycetes (10·7 ± 2·2 ‰) were significantly more enriched in 15N than ectomycorrhizal (5·2 ± 4·0 ‰) and saprotrophic basidiomycetes (3·3 ± 2·1 ‰).Conclusions As hypothesized, it is suggested that the observed gradient in 15N enrichment of Epipactis species is strongly driven by 15N abundance of their mycorrhizal fungi; i.e. ɛ15N in Epipactis spp. associated with rhizoctonias < ɛ15N in Epipactis spp. with ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes < ɛ15N in Epipactis spp. with ectomycorrhizal ascomycetes and basidiomycetes < ɛ15N in Epipactis spp. with ectomycorrhizal ascomycetes.

Journal

Annals of BotanyOxford University Press

Published: May 1, 2017

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