Variety of Enriching Early Life Activities Linked to Late Life Cognitive Functioning in Urban Community-Dwelling African Americans

Variety of Enriching Early Life Activities Linked to Late Life Cognitive Functioning in Urban... Abstract Objectives The early environment is thought to be a critical period in understanding the cognitive health disparities African Americans face today. Much is known about the positive role enriching environments have in mid- and late-life and the negative function adverse experiences have in childhood; however, little is known about the relationship between enriching childhood experiences and late life cognition. The current study examines the link between variety of enriching early life activities with late life cognitive functioning in a sample of sociodemographic at-risk older adults. Method This study used data from African Americans from the Brain and Health Substudy of The Baltimore Experience Corps Trial (M = 67.2, SD = 5.9; N = 93). Participants completed a battery of neuropsychological assessments and a seven-item retrospective inventory of enriching activities before age 13. Results Findings revealed that a greater enriching early life activities score was linked to favorable outcomes in educational attainment, processing speed, and executive functioning. Discussion Results provide promising evidence that enriching early environments are associated with late life educational and cognitive outcomes. Findings support the cognitive reserve and engagement frameworks and have implications to extend lifespan prevention approaches when tackling age-related cognitive declines, diseases, and health disparities. Cognitive reserve, Developmental assets, Health disparities, Minority research, Life course Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2018. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences Oxford University Press

Variety of Enriching Early Life Activities Linked to Late Life Cognitive Functioning in Urban Community-Dwelling African Americans

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2018. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
ISSN
1079-5014
eISSN
1758-5368
D.O.I.
10.1093/geronb/gby056
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Objectives The early environment is thought to be a critical period in understanding the cognitive health disparities African Americans face today. Much is known about the positive role enriching environments have in mid- and late-life and the negative function adverse experiences have in childhood; however, little is known about the relationship between enriching childhood experiences and late life cognition. The current study examines the link between variety of enriching early life activities with late life cognitive functioning in a sample of sociodemographic at-risk older adults. Method This study used data from African Americans from the Brain and Health Substudy of The Baltimore Experience Corps Trial (M = 67.2, SD = 5.9; N = 93). Participants completed a battery of neuropsychological assessments and a seven-item retrospective inventory of enriching activities before age 13. Results Findings revealed that a greater enriching early life activities score was linked to favorable outcomes in educational attainment, processing speed, and executive functioning. Discussion Results provide promising evidence that enriching early environments are associated with late life educational and cognitive outcomes. Findings support the cognitive reserve and engagement frameworks and have implications to extend lifespan prevention approaches when tackling age-related cognitive declines, diseases, and health disparities. Cognitive reserve, Developmental assets, Health disparities, Minority research, Life course Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2018. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

Journal

The Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social SciencesOxford University Press

Published: May 7, 2018

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