Utility of Adipocyte Fractions in Fat Grafting in an Athymic Rat Model

Utility of Adipocyte Fractions in Fat Grafting in an Athymic Rat Model Abstract Background Multiple processing and handling methods of autologous fat yields to variations in graft retention and viability, which results in unpredictable clinical outcomes. Objective This study aims to understand the skin effects of fat graft preparations that contain a varying ratio of free-lipid and stem-cell–bearing stromal vascular fractions (SVF). Methods Lipoaspirates from consenting patients were processed into emulsified fat and then SVF and adipocyte fractions (free-lipid). SVF enriched with 0%, 5%, and 15% free-lipid were grafted along the dorsum of athymic rats. The xenografts were collected 45 days after grafting and then prepped for immunostaining. Results Xenografts resulted in viable tissue mass under the panniculus carnosus of rats as confirmed with human specific markers. A low percentage of human cells was also detected in the lower reticular dermis. Although grafts with SVF formed adipocytes of normal architecture, grafts formed with free-lipid alone resulted in large lipid vacuoles in varying sizes. Among graft preparations, SVF with 10% free-lipid resulted in much-developed adipocyte architecture with collagen and elastin. Compared with SVF alone grafts, SVF with free-lipid had higher CD44 expression, suggesting a localized immune response of adipocytes. Conclusion Current studies suggest that SVF enriched with approximately 10% free-lipid provides the best conditions for fat graft differentiation into viable fat tissue formation as well as collagen and elastin production to provide mechanical support for overlaying skin in an athymic rat model. Additionally, application of this therapeutic modality in a simple clinical setting may offer a practical way to concentrate SVF with free-lipid in a small volume for the improvement of clinical defects. © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aesthetic Surgery Journal Oxford University Press

Utility of Adipocyte Fractions in Fat Grafting in an Athymic Rat Model

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Publisher
Mosby Inc.
Copyright
© 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
1090-820X
eISSN
1527-330X
D.O.I.
10.1093/asj/sjy111
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Background Multiple processing and handling methods of autologous fat yields to variations in graft retention and viability, which results in unpredictable clinical outcomes. Objective This study aims to understand the skin effects of fat graft preparations that contain a varying ratio of free-lipid and stem-cell–bearing stromal vascular fractions (SVF). Methods Lipoaspirates from consenting patients were processed into emulsified fat and then SVF and adipocyte fractions (free-lipid). SVF enriched with 0%, 5%, and 15% free-lipid were grafted along the dorsum of athymic rats. The xenografts were collected 45 days after grafting and then prepped for immunostaining. Results Xenografts resulted in viable tissue mass under the panniculus carnosus of rats as confirmed with human specific markers. A low percentage of human cells was also detected in the lower reticular dermis. Although grafts with SVF formed adipocytes of normal architecture, grafts formed with free-lipid alone resulted in large lipid vacuoles in varying sizes. Among graft preparations, SVF with 10% free-lipid resulted in much-developed adipocyte architecture with collagen and elastin. Compared with SVF alone grafts, SVF with free-lipid had higher CD44 expression, suggesting a localized immune response of adipocytes. Conclusion Current studies suggest that SVF enriched with approximately 10% free-lipid provides the best conditions for fat graft differentiation into viable fat tissue formation as well as collagen and elastin production to provide mechanical support for overlaying skin in an athymic rat model. Additionally, application of this therapeutic modality in a simple clinical setting may offer a practical way to concentrate SVF with free-lipid in a small volume for the improvement of clinical defects. © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Aesthetic Surgery JournalOxford University Press

Published: May 2, 2018

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