Unveiling “Musica Universalis” of the Cell: A Brief History of biological 12h Rhythms

Unveiling “Musica Universalis” of the Cell: A Brief History of biological 12h Rhythms Abstract Musica Universalis is an ancient philosophical concept claiming the movements of celestial bodies follow mathematical equations and resonate to produce an inaudible harmony of music, and the harmonious sounds that men make were an approximation of this larger harmony of the universe (1). Besides music, electromagnetic waves such as light and electric signals also are presented as harmonic resonances. Despite the seemingly universal theme of harmonic resonance in various disciplines, it was not until recently that the same harmonic resonance was discovered also to exist in biological systems. Contrary to traditional belief that a biological system is either at steady state or cycles with a single frequency, it is now appreciated that most biological systems have no homeostatic “set point”, but rather oscillate as composite rhythms consisting of superimposed oscillations (2). These oscillations often cycle at different harmonics of the circadian rhythm, and among these, the ∼12h oscillation is most prevalent (2). In this mini-review, we focus on these 12h oscillations, with special attention to their evolutionary origin, regulation and functions in mammals, as well as their relationship to the circadian rhythm. We further examine the potential roles of the 12h-clock in regulating hepatic steatosis, aging and the possibility of 12h-clock-based chronotherapy. Finally, we posit that biological rhythms are also “Musica Universalis”: while the circadian rhythm is synchronized to the 24h light/dark cycle coinciding with the Earth’s rotation, the mammalian 12h-clock may have evolved from the circatidal clock, which is entrained by the 12h tidal cues orchestrated by the moon. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society This article has been published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial, No-Derivatives License (CC BY-NC-ND; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Endocrine Society Oxford University Press

Unveiling “Musica Universalis” of the Cell: A Brief History of biological 12h Rhythms

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/unveiling-musica-universalis-of-the-cell-a-brief-history-of-biological-YkVr0FAcgE
Publisher
Endocrine Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society
eISSN
2472-1972
D.O.I.
10.1210/js.2018-00113
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Musica Universalis is an ancient philosophical concept claiming the movements of celestial bodies follow mathematical equations and resonate to produce an inaudible harmony of music, and the harmonious sounds that men make were an approximation of this larger harmony of the universe (1). Besides music, electromagnetic waves such as light and electric signals also are presented as harmonic resonances. Despite the seemingly universal theme of harmonic resonance in various disciplines, it was not until recently that the same harmonic resonance was discovered also to exist in biological systems. Contrary to traditional belief that a biological system is either at steady state or cycles with a single frequency, it is now appreciated that most biological systems have no homeostatic “set point”, but rather oscillate as composite rhythms consisting of superimposed oscillations (2). These oscillations often cycle at different harmonics of the circadian rhythm, and among these, the ∼12h oscillation is most prevalent (2). In this mini-review, we focus on these 12h oscillations, with special attention to their evolutionary origin, regulation and functions in mammals, as well as their relationship to the circadian rhythm. We further examine the potential roles of the 12h-clock in regulating hepatic steatosis, aging and the possibility of 12h-clock-based chronotherapy. Finally, we posit that biological rhythms are also “Musica Universalis”: while the circadian rhythm is synchronized to the 24h light/dark cycle coinciding with the Earth’s rotation, the mammalian 12h-clock may have evolved from the circatidal clock, which is entrained by the 12h tidal cues orchestrated by the moon. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society This article has been published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial, No-Derivatives License (CC BY-NC-ND; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

Journal

Journal of the Endocrine SocietyOxford University Press

Published: Jun 6, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off