Untreated Growing Cranial Fractures Detected in Late Stage

Untreated Growing Cranial Fractures Detected in Late Stage AbstractOBJECTIVE:Because the great majority of published cases of treated growing cranial fractures (GCFs) involved infants and children, the natural evolution of untreated GCFs is not well known. The question of whether untreated GCFs may cause progressive neurological deficits is controversial.METHODS:This retrospective study is of GCFs treated between 1989 and 1997. Nine patients (eight male patients and one female patient; median age, 20.5 yr) with GCFs who underwent surgical intervention during the late stage are presented. The dural and cranial defects were repaired, and additional decompressive surgical procedures (cyst fenestration, n = 6; cyst excision, n = 1; cyst excision with cystoperitoneal shunting, n = 2) were performed for all patients. This is the largest of the published series.RESULTS:All of the patients had histories of severe head trauma that occurred during childhood. The average age at the time of the onset of symptoms was approximately 13.1 years, and the interval between head injury and first symptom ranged from 8 to 13 years. All of the patients had lytic lesions in the cranium. Headache was the most common symptom, and of eight patients, seven improved completely and one improved partially. One of four epileptic patients was seizure-free postoperatively. None of the paresis improved, except in one patient.CONCLUSION:We conclude that untreated GCFs may cause delayed onset neurological manifestations in addition to cranial growth asymmetry. GCFs, discovered incidentally in adolescence or adulthood without any neurological deficits, should be operated on as soon as feasible to prevent further brain destruction. Cranioplasty with dural repair, in addition to cyst fenestration, should be considered as the essential procedure for the treatment of these lesions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurosurgery Oxford University Press

Untreated Growing Cranial Fractures Detected in Late Stage

Untreated Growing Cranial Fractures Detected in Late Stage

CLIN ICA L STUDIES Murat Kutlay, M.D., Nusret Demircan, M.D., Osman Niyazi Akin, M.D., Cinar Basekim, M.D. Department of Neurosurgery (MK, N D , O N A ) and Radiology (CB), Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Haydarpa^a Training Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey O BJECTIVE: Because the great majority of published cases of treated growing cranial fractures (GCFs) involved infants and children, the natural evolution of untreated G C Fs is not well known. The question of whether untreated G C Fs may cause progressive neurological deficits is controversial. M ETHO DS: This retrospective study is of G C Fs treated between 1989 and 1997. Nine patients (eight male patients and one female patient; median age, 20.5 yr) with G C Fs who underwent surgical intervention during the late stage are presented. The dural and cranial defects were repaired, and additional decompressive surgical procedures (cyst fenestration, n = 6; cyst excision, n = 1; cyst excision with cystoperitoneal shunting, n = 2) were performed for all patients. This is the largest of the published series. RESULTS: All of the patients had histories of severe head trauma that occurred during childhood. The average age at the time of the onset of symptoms was approximately 13.1 years, and the interval between head injury and first symptom ranged from 8 to 13 years. All of the patients had lytic lesions in the cranium. Headache was the most common symptom, and of eight patients, seven improved completely and one improved partially. One of four epileptic patients was seizure-free postoperatively. None of the paresis improved, except in one patient. C O N C L U S IO N : We conclude that untreated G C Fs may cause delayed onset neurological manifestations in addition to cranial growth asymmetry. G CFs, discovered incidentally in adolescence or adulthood without any neurolog­ ical deficits, should be operated on as soon as feasible to prevent further brain destruction. Cranioplasty with dural repair, in addition to cyst...
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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0148-396X
eISSN
1524-4040
D.O.I.
10.1097/00006123-199807000-00045
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractOBJECTIVE:Because the great majority of published cases of treated growing cranial fractures (GCFs) involved infants and children, the natural evolution of untreated GCFs is not well known. The question of whether untreated GCFs may cause progressive neurological deficits is controversial.METHODS:This retrospective study is of GCFs treated between 1989 and 1997. Nine patients (eight male patients and one female patient; median age, 20.5 yr) with GCFs who underwent surgical intervention during the late stage are presented. The dural and cranial defects were repaired, and additional decompressive surgical procedures (cyst fenestration, n = 6; cyst excision, n = 1; cyst excision with cystoperitoneal shunting, n = 2) were performed for all patients. This is the largest of the published series.RESULTS:All of the patients had histories of severe head trauma that occurred during childhood. The average age at the time of the onset of symptoms was approximately 13.1 years, and the interval between head injury and first symptom ranged from 8 to 13 years. All of the patients had lytic lesions in the cranium. Headache was the most common symptom, and of eight patients, seven improved completely and one improved partially. One of four epileptic patients was seizure-free postoperatively. None of the paresis improved, except in one patient.CONCLUSION:We conclude that untreated GCFs may cause delayed onset neurological manifestations in addition to cranial growth asymmetry. GCFs, discovered incidentally in adolescence or adulthood without any neurological deficits, should be operated on as soon as feasible to prevent further brain destruction. Cranioplasty with dural repair, in addition to cyst fenestration, should be considered as the essential procedure for the treatment of these lesions.

Journal

NeurosurgeryOxford University Press

Published: Jul 1, 1998

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