Uncovering Key Small RNAs Associated with Gametocidal Action in Wheat

Uncovering Key Small RNAs Associated with Gametocidal Action in Wheat Abstract Gametocidal (Gc) chromosomes can kill gametes that lack them by causing chromosomal breakage to ensure their preferential transmission, and have been exploited in genetic breeding. The present study investigated the possible roles of small RNAs (sRNA) in Gc action. By sequencing two small RNA libraries from the anthers of Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring (CS) and Chinese Spring-Gc 3C chromosome monosomic addition line (CS-3C), we identified 239 conserved and 72 putative novel microRNAs (miRNAs), including 135 differentially expressed miRNAs. These miRNAs were predicted to target multiple genes with various molecular functions relevant to the features of Gc action, including sterility and genome instability. The transgenic overexpression of miRNA, which was upregulated in CS-3C, reduced rice fertility. The CS-3C line exhibited a genome-wide reduction in 24-nt siRNAs compared with that of the CS line, particularly in transposable element (TE) and repetitive DNA sequences. Corresponding to this reduction, the bisulfite sequencing analysis of four retro-TE sequences showed a decrease in CHH methylation, typical of RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). These results demonstrate that both miRNA-directed regulation of gene expression and siRNA-directed DNA methylation of target TE loci could play a role in Gc action. chromosomal breakage, DNA methylation, fertility, gametocidal action, microRNA, siRNA, Triticum aestivum © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Experimental Botany Oxford University Press

Uncovering Key Small RNAs Associated with Gametocidal Action in Wheat

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/uncovering-key-small-rnas-associated-with-gametocidal-action-in-wheat-wJ8rZ5Hf1b
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0022-0957
eISSN
1460-2431
D.O.I.
10.1093/jxb/ery175
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Gametocidal (Gc) chromosomes can kill gametes that lack them by causing chromosomal breakage to ensure their preferential transmission, and have been exploited in genetic breeding. The present study investigated the possible roles of small RNAs (sRNA) in Gc action. By sequencing two small RNA libraries from the anthers of Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring (CS) and Chinese Spring-Gc 3C chromosome monosomic addition line (CS-3C), we identified 239 conserved and 72 putative novel microRNAs (miRNAs), including 135 differentially expressed miRNAs. These miRNAs were predicted to target multiple genes with various molecular functions relevant to the features of Gc action, including sterility and genome instability. The transgenic overexpression of miRNA, which was upregulated in CS-3C, reduced rice fertility. The CS-3C line exhibited a genome-wide reduction in 24-nt siRNAs compared with that of the CS line, particularly in transposable element (TE) and repetitive DNA sequences. Corresponding to this reduction, the bisulfite sequencing analysis of four retro-TE sequences showed a decrease in CHH methylation, typical of RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). These results demonstrate that both miRNA-directed regulation of gene expression and siRNA-directed DNA methylation of target TE loci could play a role in Gc action. chromosomal breakage, DNA methylation, fertility, gametocidal action, microRNA, siRNA, Triticum aestivum © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Journal of Experimental BotanyOxford University Press

Published: May 11, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off