Typhoidal Salmonella serovars: Ecological opportunity and the evolution of a new pathovar

Typhoidal Salmonella serovars: Ecological opportunity and the evolution of a new pathovar Abstract Typhoid and paratyphoid fever are severe systemic infections caused by human-adapted typhoidal Salmonella serovars that are indistinguishable in their clinical presentation, but differ from human gastroenteritis caused by zoonotic non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars. Typhoidal Salmonella serovars evolved from ancestral gastrointestinal pathogens through genetic changes that supported a change in pathogen ecology. Typhoidal Salmonella serovars share virulence properties that were acquired through convergent evolution and therefore this group is not defined by the presence of shared virulence genes that are absent from non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars. One feature distinguishing typhoidal Salmonella serovars from gastrointestinal pathogens is their ability to avert the respiratory burst of neutrophils. Furthermore, typhoidal Salmonella serovars possess several mechanisms to moderate intestinal inflammation, which are absent from non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars. Collectively, these shared virulence mechanisms enable typhoidal Salmonella serovars to breach an intact mucosal barrier and reach the gall bladder, a new ecological niche that is important because chronic gall bladder carriage promotes disease transmission. Thus the morbidity and mortality resulting from the severe systemic infection that enables typhoidal Salmonella serovars to reach the gall bladder is coupled to their capacity for infectious transmission, which is the principal driving force of natural selection directing the emergence of this pathovar. typhoid fever, gastroenteritis, Salmonella, Evolution © FEMS 2018. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png FEMS Microbiology Reviews Oxford University Press

Typhoidal Salmonella serovars: Ecological opportunity and the evolution of a new pathovar

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Publisher
Blackwell
Copyright
© FEMS 2018.
ISSN
0168-6445
eISSN
1574-6976
D.O.I.
10.1093/femsre/fuy024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Typhoid and paratyphoid fever are severe systemic infections caused by human-adapted typhoidal Salmonella serovars that are indistinguishable in their clinical presentation, but differ from human gastroenteritis caused by zoonotic non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars. Typhoidal Salmonella serovars evolved from ancestral gastrointestinal pathogens through genetic changes that supported a change in pathogen ecology. Typhoidal Salmonella serovars share virulence properties that were acquired through convergent evolution and therefore this group is not defined by the presence of shared virulence genes that are absent from non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars. One feature distinguishing typhoidal Salmonella serovars from gastrointestinal pathogens is their ability to avert the respiratory burst of neutrophils. Furthermore, typhoidal Salmonella serovars possess several mechanisms to moderate intestinal inflammation, which are absent from non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars. Collectively, these shared virulence mechanisms enable typhoidal Salmonella serovars to breach an intact mucosal barrier and reach the gall bladder, a new ecological niche that is important because chronic gall bladder carriage promotes disease transmission. Thus the morbidity and mortality resulting from the severe systemic infection that enables typhoidal Salmonella serovars to reach the gall bladder is coupled to their capacity for infectious transmission, which is the principal driving force of natural selection directing the emergence of this pathovar. typhoid fever, gastroenteritis, Salmonella, Evolution © FEMS 2018. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

FEMS Microbiology ReviewsOxford University Press

Published: May 21, 2018

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