Tweets and Transformative Technologies: Enabling Our Endocrine Future

Tweets and Transformative Technologies: Enabling Our Endocrine Future I (aka @teresakwoodruff) just retweeted: Richard O’Grady @rtogrady #Endocrinology, a journal of @TheEndoSociety, now publishes continuous, online-only, with no color charges and the first eight pages free for articles authored by Society members. Read/share/submit at academic.oup.com/endo. The publication of Endocrinology is a complex operation that relies on the work and talent of many people. Richard O’Grady is the Chief Publications Officer of the Endocrine Society. He leads the team that publishes our journals—Endocrinology, The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Endocrine Reviews, and Journal of the Endocrine Society—and collaborates closely with departments that produce Endocrine News and our Clinical Practice Guidelines and Scientific Statements. Richard also works with our global marketing groups and librarian communities. He is an advocate for technologies that make it easier for consumers of our academic products to find the information they seek in digitally relevant, mobile, continuous ways. Richard works with the Publications Core Committee of the Society, one of the great thought groups who have their collective eyes on where publishing is going. Joining me at Endocrinology is Tim Beardsley, a relatively new recruit compared with the long-tenured Maggie Haworth. I interface with Tim and Maggie in a “continuous” manner to enable the continuous publication of our journal, which means that peer-reviewed science is available to be read and cited as quickly as possible. Tim’s roles are many but, importantly, he is our Executive Editor and is also pushing the envelope in the area of technology. He wrote recently that “(t)echnological change has created economic forces that powerfully affect scholarly publications” (1). Maggie is the Director of Publishing Operations and knows the landscape of Endocrinology at the DNA level. She and the rest of the Publications staff work together to ensure the online journal is as easy to read as print but with better ways to find information. I hope you are bookmarking the Endocrinology home page (https://academic.oup.com/endo). I have revamped it to include a new Mission Statement: “The mission of Endocrinology is to be the authoritative source of emerging hormone science and to disseminate that new knowledge to scientists, clinicians, and the public in a way that will enable ‘hormone science to health’.” The home page includes links to Featured Articles, as well as to our boards, information on Altmetric, and other important enhancements for first-time or long-term authors in our journal. There is also a new video from me that amplifies my thinking on Endocrinology. Check this out and let me know your thoughts. Richard, Tim, and Maggie, along with others in the Society’s Publications department, make editors’, reviewers’, and authors’ jobs much more seamless and ensure our technology is cutting-edge but stays in the background, allowing our science to be in the forefront. New technologies are essential to advances in science that create meaningful new knowledge as well as translate to patients. I want to draw your attention to several of these new technologies published in Endocrinology. First is the article from Julie Kim’s group that uses organoids as a model for uterine leiomyoma (2). For too long, science has relied on the most reductionist, and I would argue least biologically relevant, way to study biological/endocrinological function, monolayers of cells cultured on flat plastic. Dr. Kim and her group are making important advances in leiomyoma through reaggregation of the cells into three-dimensional “interdisciplinary” units. This is permitting a new way of studying disease mechanisms. [In the spirit of full disclosure, Julie and I collaborated last year on a paper that brings microfluidics into endocrinology with a device that permits active fluid flow between organ units (3).] One of the reasons the Petri dish has survived so long as a biological tool is that it allows cells to survive by taking up oxygen, etc. Tissues have a harder time in static culture, and, just like our organs interacting in vivo, tissue constructs and organoids are better enabled to survive in a durable manner when nutrients are moving in and metabolic wastes moving out. Cells in a Petri dish are basically bathed in their own metabolic waste until media are exchanged. Moreover, these same cell models are absent male or female hormones and primary cells are more often XY than XX, creating an odd combination of in vitro circumstances that are not particularly relevant to in vivo endocrinology or biology. Other technologies recently published in Endocrinology include the use of cultured placental explants and a serotonin transporter inhibitor (4), the use of tandem mass spectrometry to analyze immunoprecipitated proteins (5), and several new animal models (6–8), which are a hallmark of studies published in Endocrinology. I also draw your attention to the importance of using the right cellular model, which is described in the paper by Stefan Groeneweg et al. (9). It is an exciting time to be in Endocrinology!! I close with one last retweet: Northwestern KimLab @JulieKim20 A new publication out today from our laboratory! This study tests the efficacy of BCL-2 inhibitors on a new 3D fibroid model. AKT/BCL-2 axis mediates survival of uterine leiomyoma in a novel 3D spheroid model | Endocrinology | Oxford Academic References 1. Beardsley TM. The Endocrine Society and open access. Available at: academic.oup.com/jes/pages/es_and_oa. Accessed December 5, 2017. 2. Vidimar V, Chakravarti D, Bulun SE, Yin P, Nowak R, Wei J-J, Kim JJ. The AKT/BCL-2 axis mediates survival of uterine leiomyoma in a novel 3D spheroid model [published online ahead of print January 26, 2018]. Endocrinology . doi: 10.1210/en.2017-03191. 3. Xiao S, Coppeta JR, Rogers HB, Isenberg BC, Zhu J, Olalekan SA, McKinnon KE, Dokic D, Rashedi AS, Haisenleder DJ, Malpani SS, Arnold-Murray CA, Chen K, Jiang M, Bai L, Nguyen CT, Zhang J, Laronda MM, Hope TJ, Maniar KP, Pavone ME, Avram MJ, Sefton EC, Getsios S, Burdette JE, Kim JJ, Borenstein JT, Woodruff TK. A microfluidic culture model of the human reproductive tract and 28-day menstrual cycle. Nat Commun . 2017; 8:14584. 4. Kliman HJ, Quaratella SB, Setaro AC, Siegman EC, Subha ZT, Tal R, Milano KM, Steck TL. Pathway of maternal serotonin to the human embryo and fetus [published online ahead of print January 26, 2018]. Endocrinology . doi: 10.1210/en.2017-03025. 5. Zangari M, Yoo H, Shin I, Kim B, Edmonson R, Morgan GJ, Suva LJ, Yoon D. Thymic PTH increases after thyroparathyroidectomy in C57BL6/KaLwRij mice [published online ahead of print January 25, 2018]. Endocrinology . doi: 10.1210/en.2017-03083. 6. Holt LJ, Brandon AE, Small L, Suryana E, Preston E, Wilks D, Mokbel N, Coles CA, White JD, Turner N, Daly RJ, Cooney GJ. Ablation of Grb10 specifically in muscle impacts on muscle size and glucose metabolism in mice [published online ahead of print January 25, 2018. Endocrinology . doi: 10.1210/en.2017-00851. 7. Mohácsik P, Erdélyi F, Baranyi M, Botz B, Szabó G, Tóth M, Haltrich I, Helyes Z, Sperlágh B, Tóth Z, Sinkó R, Lechan RM, Bianco AC, Fekete C, Gereben B. A transgenic mouse model for detection of tissue-specific thyroid hormone action. Endocrinology . 2018; 159( 2): 1159– 1171. Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed  8. Kim D, Song L, Wang J, Wu H, Gu G, Sugi Y, Li Z, Wang H. GRP94 is an essential regulator of pancreatic β-cell development, mass, and function in male mice. Endocrinology . 2018; 159( 2): 1062– 1073. Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed  9. Groeneweg S, van den Berge A, Meima ME, Peeters RP, Visser TJ, Visser WE. Effects of chemical chaperones on thyroid hormone transport by MCT8 mutants in patient-derived fibroblasts [published online ahead of print January 4, 2018]. Endocrinology . doi: 10.1210/en.2017-00846. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Endocrinology Oxford University Press

Tweets and Transformative Technologies: Enabling Our Endocrine Future

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society
ISSN
0013-7227
eISSN
1945-7170
D.O.I.
10.1210/en.2018-00114
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Abstract

I (aka @teresakwoodruff) just retweeted: Richard O’Grady @rtogrady #Endocrinology, a journal of @TheEndoSociety, now publishes continuous, online-only, with no color charges and the first eight pages free for articles authored by Society members. Read/share/submit at academic.oup.com/endo. The publication of Endocrinology is a complex operation that relies on the work and talent of many people. Richard O’Grady is the Chief Publications Officer of the Endocrine Society. He leads the team that publishes our journals—Endocrinology, The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Endocrine Reviews, and Journal of the Endocrine Society—and collaborates closely with departments that produce Endocrine News and our Clinical Practice Guidelines and Scientific Statements. Richard also works with our global marketing groups and librarian communities. He is an advocate for technologies that make it easier for consumers of our academic products to find the information they seek in digitally relevant, mobile, continuous ways. Richard works with the Publications Core Committee of the Society, one of the great thought groups who have their collective eyes on where publishing is going. Joining me at Endocrinology is Tim Beardsley, a relatively new recruit compared with the long-tenured Maggie Haworth. I interface with Tim and Maggie in a “continuous” manner to enable the continuous publication of our journal, which means that peer-reviewed science is available to be read and cited as quickly as possible. Tim’s roles are many but, importantly, he is our Executive Editor and is also pushing the envelope in the area of technology. He wrote recently that “(t)echnological change has created economic forces that powerfully affect scholarly publications” (1). Maggie is the Director of Publishing Operations and knows the landscape of Endocrinology at the DNA level. She and the rest of the Publications staff work together to ensure the online journal is as easy to read as print but with better ways to find information. I hope you are bookmarking the Endocrinology home page (https://academic.oup.com/endo). I have revamped it to include a new Mission Statement: “The mission of Endocrinology is to be the authoritative source of emerging hormone science and to disseminate that new knowledge to scientists, clinicians, and the public in a way that will enable ‘hormone science to health’.” The home page includes links to Featured Articles, as well as to our boards, information on Altmetric, and other important enhancements for first-time or long-term authors in our journal. There is also a new video from me that amplifies my thinking on Endocrinology. Check this out and let me know your thoughts. Richard, Tim, and Maggie, along with others in the Society’s Publications department, make editors’, reviewers’, and authors’ jobs much more seamless and ensure our technology is cutting-edge but stays in the background, allowing our science to be in the forefront. New technologies are essential to advances in science that create meaningful new knowledge as well as translate to patients. I want to draw your attention to several of these new technologies published in Endocrinology. First is the article from Julie Kim’s group that uses organoids as a model for uterine leiomyoma (2). For too long, science has relied on the most reductionist, and I would argue least biologically relevant, way to study biological/endocrinological function, monolayers of cells cultured on flat plastic. Dr. Kim and her group are making important advances in leiomyoma through reaggregation of the cells into three-dimensional “interdisciplinary” units. This is permitting a new way of studying disease mechanisms. [In the spirit of full disclosure, Julie and I collaborated last year on a paper that brings microfluidics into endocrinology with a device that permits active fluid flow between organ units (3).] One of the reasons the Petri dish has survived so long as a biological tool is that it allows cells to survive by taking up oxygen, etc. Tissues have a harder time in static culture, and, just like our organs interacting in vivo, tissue constructs and organoids are better enabled to survive in a durable manner when nutrients are moving in and metabolic wastes moving out. Cells in a Petri dish are basically bathed in their own metabolic waste until media are exchanged. Moreover, these same cell models are absent male or female hormones and primary cells are more often XY than XX, creating an odd combination of in vitro circumstances that are not particularly relevant to in vivo endocrinology or biology. Other technologies recently published in Endocrinology include the use of cultured placental explants and a serotonin transporter inhibitor (4), the use of tandem mass spectrometry to analyze immunoprecipitated proteins (5), and several new animal models (6–8), which are a hallmark of studies published in Endocrinology. I also draw your attention to the importance of using the right cellular model, which is described in the paper by Stefan Groeneweg et al. (9). It is an exciting time to be in Endocrinology!! I close with one last retweet: Northwestern KimLab @JulieKim20 A new publication out today from our laboratory! This study tests the efficacy of BCL-2 inhibitors on a new 3D fibroid model. AKT/BCL-2 axis mediates survival of uterine leiomyoma in a novel 3D spheroid model | Endocrinology | Oxford Academic References 1. Beardsley TM. The Endocrine Society and open access. Available at: academic.oup.com/jes/pages/es_and_oa. Accessed December 5, 2017. 2. Vidimar V, Chakravarti D, Bulun SE, Yin P, Nowak R, Wei J-J, Kim JJ. The AKT/BCL-2 axis mediates survival of uterine leiomyoma in a novel 3D spheroid model [published online ahead of print January 26, 2018]. Endocrinology . doi: 10.1210/en.2017-03191. 3. Xiao S, Coppeta JR, Rogers HB, Isenberg BC, Zhu J, Olalekan SA, McKinnon KE, Dokic D, Rashedi AS, Haisenleder DJ, Malpani SS, Arnold-Murray CA, Chen K, Jiang M, Bai L, Nguyen CT, Zhang J, Laronda MM, Hope TJ, Maniar KP, Pavone ME, Avram MJ, Sefton EC, Getsios S, Burdette JE, Kim JJ, Borenstein JT, Woodruff TK. A microfluidic culture model of the human reproductive tract and 28-day menstrual cycle. Nat Commun . 2017; 8:14584. 4. Kliman HJ, Quaratella SB, Setaro AC, Siegman EC, Subha ZT, Tal R, Milano KM, Steck TL. Pathway of maternal serotonin to the human embryo and fetus [published online ahead of print January 26, 2018]. Endocrinology . doi: 10.1210/en.2017-03025. 5. Zangari M, Yoo H, Shin I, Kim B, Edmonson R, Morgan GJ, Suva LJ, Yoon D. Thymic PTH increases after thyroparathyroidectomy in C57BL6/KaLwRij mice [published online ahead of print January 25, 2018]. Endocrinology . doi: 10.1210/en.2017-03083. 6. Holt LJ, Brandon AE, Small L, Suryana E, Preston E, Wilks D, Mokbel N, Coles CA, White JD, Turner N, Daly RJ, Cooney GJ. Ablation of Grb10 specifically in muscle impacts on muscle size and glucose metabolism in mice [published online ahead of print January 25, 2018. Endocrinology . doi: 10.1210/en.2017-00851. 7. Mohácsik P, Erdélyi F, Baranyi M, Botz B, Szabó G, Tóth M, Haltrich I, Helyes Z, Sperlágh B, Tóth Z, Sinkó R, Lechan RM, Bianco AC, Fekete C, Gereben B. A transgenic mouse model for detection of tissue-specific thyroid hormone action. Endocrinology . 2018; 159( 2): 1159– 1171. Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed  8. Kim D, Song L, Wang J, Wu H, Gu G, Sugi Y, Li Z, Wang H. GRP94 is an essential regulator of pancreatic β-cell development, mass, and function in male mice. Endocrinology . 2018; 159( 2): 1062– 1073. Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed  9. Groeneweg S, van den Berge A, Meima ME, Peeters RP, Visser TJ, Visser WE. Effects of chemical chaperones on thyroid hormone transport by MCT8 mutants in patient-derived fibroblasts [published online ahead of print January 4, 2018]. Endocrinology . doi: 10.1210/en.2017-00846. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society

Journal

EndocrinologyOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2018

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