Tumor Size Predicts Control of Benign Meningiomas Treated with Radiotherapy

Tumor Size Predicts Control of Benign Meningiomas Treated with Radiotherapy AbstractOBJECTIVEThe goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of postoperative residual tumor size on the outcomes for patients with incompletely resected benign meningiomas who underwent radiotherapy (RT).METHODSFifty-four patients with incompletely resected benign meningiomas received postoperative RT between 1984 and 1995. Surgery consisted of partial resection for 43 patients (80%) and biopsy for 11 (20%). All patients underwent postoperative imaging (using computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging), and the median residual tumor size was 3.5 cm (in greatest dimension). Thirty-eight tumors (69%) were <5 cm, and 17 (31 %) were ≥5 cm. The median RT dose was 54 Gy (range, 45-60 Gy), delivered in daily fractions of 1.8 to 2 Gy. The median follow-up period was 55 months.RESULTSThe 5-year actuarial progression-free survival (PFS) rate for the entire group was 76%. The only significant predictor of PFS rates was residual tumor size. Large residual tumors (≥5 cm) exhibited a worse 5-year PFS rate than did small tumors (<5 cm) (40 versus 93%, P < 0.0001). When analyzed as a continuous variable, residual tumor size remained a significant prognostic factor. Age, sex, tumor histological features, tumor location, timing of treatment (immediate versus delayed), extent of resection, and RT dose (<54 Gy versus ≥54 Gy) did not reach prognostic significance. The difference in PFS rates for small and large residual tumors translated into a significant difference in 5-year cause-specific survival rates (65 versus 97%, P = 0.01).CONCLUSIONFor incompletely resected benign meningiomas treated with RT, residual tumor size is the most significant predictor of tumor control. Small residual tumors are well controlled with conventional RT doses and techniques. In contrast, more aggressive therapies should be considered for large tumors http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurosurgery Oxford University Press

Tumor Size Predicts Control of Benign Meningiomas Treated with Radiotherapy

Tumor Size Predicts Control of Benign Meningiomas Treated with Radiotherapy

Tumor Size Predicts Control of Benign Meningiomas Treated with Radiotherapy Philip P. Connell, M.D., R. Loch Macdonald, M.D., Ph.D., David B. Mansur, M.D., M. Kelly Nicholas, M.D., Ph.D., Arno J. Mundt, M.D. Departments of Radiation and Cellular Oncology (PPC, DBM, AJM), Surgery (Division of Neurosurgery) (RLM), and Neurology (MKN), University of Chicago Hospitals, Chicago, Illinois OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of postoperative residual tumor size on the outcomes for patients with incompletely resected benign meningiomas who underwent radiotherapy (RT). METHODS: Fifty-four patients with incompletely resected benign meningiomas received postoperative RT between 1984 and 1995. Surgery consisted of partial resection for 43 patients (80%) and biopsy for 11 (20%). All patients underwent postoperative imaging (using computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging), and the median residual tumor size was 3.5 cm (in greatest dimension). Thirty-eight tumors (69%) were <5 cm, and 17 (31 %) were ^ 5 cm. The median RT dose was 54 Gy (range, 4 5 - 6 0 Gy), delivered in daily fractions of 1.8 to 2 Gy. The median follow-up period was 55 months. RESULTS: The 5-year actuarial progression-free survival (PFS) rate for the entire group was 7 6 % . The only significant predictor of PFS rates was residual tumor size. Large residual tumors (^ 5 cm) exhibited a worse 5-year PFS rate than did small tumors (< 5 cm) (40 versus 9 3 % , P < 0.0001). When analyzed as a continuous variable, residual tumor size remained a significant prognostic factor. Age, sex, tumor histological features, tumor location, timing of treatment (immediate versus delayed), extent of resection, and RT dose ( < 5 4 Gy versus ^ 5 4 Gy) did not reach prognostic significance. The difference in PFS rates for small and large residual tumors translated into a significant difference in 5-year cause-specific survival rates (65 versus 9 7 % , P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: For...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/tumor-size-predicts-control-of-benign-meningiomas-treated-with-MZWDNo7Fzs
Publisher
Congress of Neurological Surgeons
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0148-396X
eISSN
1524-4040
D.O.I.
10.1097/00006123-199906000-00018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractOBJECTIVEThe goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of postoperative residual tumor size on the outcomes for patients with incompletely resected benign meningiomas who underwent radiotherapy (RT).METHODSFifty-four patients with incompletely resected benign meningiomas received postoperative RT between 1984 and 1995. Surgery consisted of partial resection for 43 patients (80%) and biopsy for 11 (20%). All patients underwent postoperative imaging (using computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging), and the median residual tumor size was 3.5 cm (in greatest dimension). Thirty-eight tumors (69%) were <5 cm, and 17 (31 %) were ≥5 cm. The median RT dose was 54 Gy (range, 45-60 Gy), delivered in daily fractions of 1.8 to 2 Gy. The median follow-up period was 55 months.RESULTSThe 5-year actuarial progression-free survival (PFS) rate for the entire group was 76%. The only significant predictor of PFS rates was residual tumor size. Large residual tumors (≥5 cm) exhibited a worse 5-year PFS rate than did small tumors (<5 cm) (40 versus 93%, P < 0.0001). When analyzed as a continuous variable, residual tumor size remained a significant prognostic factor. Age, sex, tumor histological features, tumor location, timing of treatment (immediate versus delayed), extent of resection, and RT dose (<54 Gy versus ≥54 Gy) did not reach prognostic significance. The difference in PFS rates for small and large residual tumors translated into a significant difference in 5-year cause-specific survival rates (65 versus 97%, P = 0.01).CONCLUSIONFor incompletely resected benign meningiomas treated with RT, residual tumor size is the most significant predictor of tumor control. Small residual tumors are well controlled with conventional RT doses and techniques. In contrast, more aggressive therapies should be considered for large tumors

Journal

NeurosurgeryOxford University Press

Published: Jun 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off