Transient Hyperemia Immediately after Rapid Decompression of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

Transient Hyperemia Immediately after Rapid Decompression of Chronic Subdural Hematoma AbstractOBJECTIVE:Intracerebral hemorrhage occurring after removal of a chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) is a rare but usually devastating postoperative complication. In patients with CSH, we determined cerebral blood flow immediately after surgical decompression to clarify the pathogenic mechanism of this complication.METHODS:In 22 patients with unilateral CSH, a catheter was inserted into the hematoma cavity through a single burr hole without leakage of the contents. Cerebral blood flow was measured using single-photon emission computed tomography 1 day before surgery, immediately after rapid decompression by opening the catheter, and 3 days after surgery.RESULTS:Single-photon emission computed tomography imaging immediately after decompression demonstrated areas of hyperemia in nine patients (41 %). In all nine patients, hyperemia was observed in the cortex beneath the CSH, and it disappeared on the 3rd postoperative day. The patients with hyperemia were significantly older than those without hyperemia. Other variables, including preoperative cerebral blood flow, intrahematoma pressure before decompression, and mean arterial blood pressure during decompression had no significant effect on the occurrence of hyperemia.CONCLUSION:In elderly patients, rapid decompression of CSH frequently results in transient hyperemia in the cerebral cortex beneath the hematoma. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurosurgery Oxford University Press

Transient Hyperemia Immediately after Rapid Decompression of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

Transient Hyperemia Immediately after Rapid Decompression of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

Transient Hyperemia Immediately after Rapid Decompression of Chronic Subdural Hematoma Kuniaki Ogasawara, M.D., Keiji Koshu, M.D., Takashi Yoshimoto, M.D., Akira Ogawa, M.D. Department of Neurosurgery (KO, AO), Iwate Medical University, Morioka; Department of Neurosurgery (KK), Kohnan Hospital, Sendai; and Department of Neurosurgery (TY), Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan O BJECTIVE: Intracerebral hemorrhage occurring after removal of a chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) is a rare but usually devastating postoperative complication. In patients with CSH, we determined cerebral blood flow immediately after surgical decompression to clarify the pathogenic mechanism of this complication. M ETHODS: In 22 patients with unilateral CSH, a catheter was inserted into the hematoma cavity through a single burr hole without leakage of the contents. Cerebral blood flow was measured using single-photon emission computed tomography 1 day before surgery, immediately after rapid decompression by opening the catheter, and 3 days after surgery. RESULTS: Single-photon emission computed tomography imaging immediately after decompression demonstrated areas of hyperemia in nine patients (41 % ). In all nine patients, hyperemia was observed in the cortex beneath the CSH, and it disappeared on the 3rd postoperative day. The patients with hyperemia were significantly older than those without hyperemia. Other variables, including preoperative cerebral blood flow, intrahematoma pressure before decompression, and mean arterial blood pressure during decompression had no significant effect on the occurrence of hyperemia. C O N C LU SIO N : In elderly patients, rapid decompression of CSH frequently results in transient hyperemia in the cerebral cortex beneath the hematoma. (N eurosurgery 45:484-489, 1999) Key words: Chronic subdural hematoma, Postoperative intracerebral hematoma, Rapid decompression, Single-photon emission computed tomog­ raphy, Transient hyperemia lthough the...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/transient-hyperemia-immediately-after-rapid-decompression-of-chronic-wpuNYTavq2
Publisher
Congress of Neurological Surgeons
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0148-396X
eISSN
1524-4040
D.O.I.
10.1097/00006123-199909000-00014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractOBJECTIVE:Intracerebral hemorrhage occurring after removal of a chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) is a rare but usually devastating postoperative complication. In patients with CSH, we determined cerebral blood flow immediately after surgical decompression to clarify the pathogenic mechanism of this complication.METHODS:In 22 patients with unilateral CSH, a catheter was inserted into the hematoma cavity through a single burr hole without leakage of the contents. Cerebral blood flow was measured using single-photon emission computed tomography 1 day before surgery, immediately after rapid decompression by opening the catheter, and 3 days after surgery.RESULTS:Single-photon emission computed tomography imaging immediately after decompression demonstrated areas of hyperemia in nine patients (41 %). In all nine patients, hyperemia was observed in the cortex beneath the CSH, and it disappeared on the 3rd postoperative day. The patients with hyperemia were significantly older than those without hyperemia. Other variables, including preoperative cerebral blood flow, intrahematoma pressure before decompression, and mean arterial blood pressure during decompression had no significant effect on the occurrence of hyperemia.CONCLUSION:In elderly patients, rapid decompression of CSH frequently results in transient hyperemia in the cerebral cortex beneath the hematoma.

Journal

NeurosurgeryOxford University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial