Town and country reptiles: A review of reptilian responses to urbanization

Town and country reptiles: A review of reptilian responses to urbanization Abstract The majority of the world population is now inhabiting urban areas, and with staggering population growth urbanization is also increasing. While work studying the effects of changing landscapes and specific urban pressures on wildlife is beginning to amass, the majority of this work focuses on avian or mammalian species. However, the effects of urbanization likely vary substantially across taxonomic groups due to differences in habitat requirements and life history. The current paper aims first to broaden the review of urban effects across reptilian species; second, to summarize the responses of reptilian fauna to specific urban features; and third, to assess the directionality of individual and population level responses to urbanization in reptile species. Based on our findings, urban research in reptilian taxa is lacking in the following areas: 1) investigating interactive or additive urban factors 2) measuring multiple morphological, behavioral and physiological endpoints within an animal, 3) linking individual to population-level responses, and 4) testing genetic/genomic differences across an urban environment as evidence for selective pressures. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Integrative and Comparative Biology Oxford University Press

Town and country reptiles: A review of reptilian responses to urbanization

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
1540-7063
eISSN
1557-7023
D.O.I.
10.1093/icb/icy052
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The majority of the world population is now inhabiting urban areas, and with staggering population growth urbanization is also increasing. While work studying the effects of changing landscapes and specific urban pressures on wildlife is beginning to amass, the majority of this work focuses on avian or mammalian species. However, the effects of urbanization likely vary substantially across taxonomic groups due to differences in habitat requirements and life history. The current paper aims first to broaden the review of urban effects across reptilian species; second, to summarize the responses of reptilian fauna to specific urban features; and third, to assess the directionality of individual and population level responses to urbanization in reptile species. Based on our findings, urban research in reptilian taxa is lacking in the following areas: 1) investigating interactive or additive urban factors 2) measuring multiple morphological, behavioral and physiological endpoints within an animal, 3) linking individual to population-level responses, and 4) testing genetic/genomic differences across an urban environment as evidence for selective pressures. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Integrative and Comparative BiologyOxford University Press

Published: Jun 4, 2018

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