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The Royal African Society, African Affairsand Apartheid: the Mustoe Controversy OF 1970

The Royal African Society, African Affairsand Apartheid: the Mustoe Controversy OF 1970 Divisions between the Royal African Society and its flagship journal African Affairsemerged in 1970 when the Vice-President of the Society, Nelson Mustoe Q.C., defended South African apartheid as ‘moral, feasible and reasonable.’ This statement, part of a letter to The Times, was offered in support of the upcoming Springbok cricket tour of Britain. The letter elicited a backlash from various groups, including the scholars behind African Affairs, and the political pressure led to the cancellation of the tour. This paper argues that the Mustoe controversy was an emblematic moment, symbolizing the transition of British Empire and commonwealth, the beginning of the political activism phase of the anti-apartheid movement in Britain, and South Africa's isolation on the world stage. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African Affairs Oxford University Press

The Royal African Society, African Affairsand Apartheid: the Mustoe Controversy OF 1970

African Affairs , Volume 122 (488): 12 – Jan 1, 2014

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal African Society. All rights reserved
ISSN
0001-9909
eISSN
1468-2621
DOI
10.1093/afraf/adu025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Divisions between the Royal African Society and its flagship journal African Affairsemerged in 1970 when the Vice-President of the Society, Nelson Mustoe Q.C., defended South African apartheid as ‘moral, feasible and reasonable.’ This statement, part of a letter to The Times, was offered in support of the upcoming Springbok cricket tour of Britain. The letter elicited a backlash from various groups, including the scholars behind African Affairs, and the political pressure led to the cancellation of the tour. This paper argues that the Mustoe controversy was an emblematic moment, symbolizing the transition of British Empire and commonwealth, the beginning of the political activism phase of the anti-apartheid movement in Britain, and South Africa's isolation on the world stage.

Journal

African AffairsOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2014

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