The Management of Patients with Arteriovenous Malformations and Associated Intracranial Aneurysms

The Management of Patients with Arteriovenous Malformations and Associated Intracranial Aneurysms AbstractOBJECTIVEFew published studies have focused specifically on the unique management issues encountered in treating patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and associated intracranial aneurysms. The primary objective of this study was to retrospectively review the clinical and radiographic features of these patients.METHODSMedical records of all patients seen at Stanford University Hospital between 1988 and 1996 with a diagnosis of AVMs were retrospectively reviewed. Aneurysms were identified by conventional angiography and characterized by size, number, and location relative to the AVMs. AVMs were graded according to the Spetzler-Martin scale. Odds ratios were calculated for the risk of intracranial hemorrhage. Variables included age, sex, number of aneurysms, and AVM grade.RESULTSForty-five of 600 patients (7.5%) were identified as having coexisting intracranial aneurysms. All 45 patients had high-flow malformations, and 58% had AVMs of Spetzler-Martin Grade IV or higher. A majority of patients had multiple aneurysms. There was a statistically significant increase in AVM hemorrhage in female patients (odds ratio, 8.53 [1.87–38.98]; P < 0.005). There was no statistically significant correlation between the development of hemorrhage and either age, AVM grade, or the number of aneurysms. Twenty-three patients (51%) presented with intracranial hemorrhage: bleeding occurred from the AVMs in 15 and from ruptured aneurysms in 5, and the source of the bleeding could not be determined in 3. Overall, nine patients (20%) bled from ruptured aneurysms: five at presentation, two during or within 3 weeks of AVM treatment, and two from new aneurysms. Two of these nine patients died as a direct result of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Five patients (11 %) developed new aneurysms.CONCLUSIONAneurysms associated with AVMs are at risk for rupture before, during, and immediately after treatment of the AVMs. New aneurysms may arise in patients with high-flow AVMs. The risk of intracranial hemorrhage from either source is higher in female patients. To reduce the complications of intracranial hemorrhage in these patients, we recommend a management protocol designed to treat the aneurysms by surgical or endovascular means before administering definitive therapy for the AVMs. Meticulous intraoperative blood pressure control and fluid management during aneurysm surgery is critical to avoid hemorrhage from the AVMs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurosurgery Oxford University Press

The Management of Patients with Arteriovenous Malformations and Associated Intracranial Aneurysms

The Management of Patients with Arteriovenous Malformations and Associated Intracranial Aneurysms

C L I N I C A L S T U D IE S The Management of Patients with Arteriovenous Malformations and Associated Intracranial Aneurysms Reid C. Thompson, M.D., Gary K. Steinberg, M.D., Ph.D., Richard P. Levy, M.D., Ph.D., Michael P. Marks, M.D. Departments of Neurosurgery (RCT, GKS) and Radiology (MPM) and The Stanford Stroke Center (GKS, MPM), Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, and Department of Radiation Medicine (RPL), Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California O BJECTIVE: Few published studies have focused specifically on the unique management issues encountered in treating patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and associated intracranial aneurysms. The primary objective of this study was to retrospectively review the clinical and radiographic features of these patients. M ETHODS: Medical records of all patients seen at Stanford University Hospital between 1988 and 1996 with a diagnosis of AVMs were retrospectively reviewed. Aneurysms were identified by conventional angiography and characterized by size, number, and location relative to the AVMs. AVMs were graded according to the Spetzler-Martin scale. Odds ratios were calculated for the risk of intracranial hemorrhage. Variables included age, sex, number of aneurysms, and AVM grade. RESULTS: Forty-five of 600 patients (7.5% ) were identified as having coexisting intracranial aneurysms. All 45 patients had high-flow malformations, and 58% had AVMs of Spetzler-Martin Grade IV or higher. A majority of patients had multiple aneurysms. There was a statistically significant increase in AVM hemorrhage in female patients (odds ratio, 8.53 [1.87-38.98]; P < 0.005). There was no statistically significant correlation between the development of hemorrhage and either age, AVM grade, or the number of aneurysms. Twenty-three patients (51% ) presented with intracranial hemorrhage: bleeding occurred from the AVMs in 15 and from ruptured aneurysms in 5, and the source of the bleeding could...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/the-management-of-patients-with-arteriovenous-malformations-and-8UodvMgk2p
Publisher
Congress of Neurological Surgeons
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0148-396X
eISSN
1524-4040
D.O.I.
10.1097/00006123-199808000-00006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractOBJECTIVEFew published studies have focused specifically on the unique management issues encountered in treating patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and associated intracranial aneurysms. The primary objective of this study was to retrospectively review the clinical and radiographic features of these patients.METHODSMedical records of all patients seen at Stanford University Hospital between 1988 and 1996 with a diagnosis of AVMs were retrospectively reviewed. Aneurysms were identified by conventional angiography and characterized by size, number, and location relative to the AVMs. AVMs were graded according to the Spetzler-Martin scale. Odds ratios were calculated for the risk of intracranial hemorrhage. Variables included age, sex, number of aneurysms, and AVM grade.RESULTSForty-five of 600 patients (7.5%) were identified as having coexisting intracranial aneurysms. All 45 patients had high-flow malformations, and 58% had AVMs of Spetzler-Martin Grade IV or higher. A majority of patients had multiple aneurysms. There was a statistically significant increase in AVM hemorrhage in female patients (odds ratio, 8.53 [1.87–38.98]; P < 0.005). There was no statistically significant correlation between the development of hemorrhage and either age, AVM grade, or the number of aneurysms. Twenty-three patients (51%) presented with intracranial hemorrhage: bleeding occurred from the AVMs in 15 and from ruptured aneurysms in 5, and the source of the bleeding could not be determined in 3. Overall, nine patients (20%) bled from ruptured aneurysms: five at presentation, two during or within 3 weeks of AVM treatment, and two from new aneurysms. Two of these nine patients died as a direct result of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Five patients (11 %) developed new aneurysms.CONCLUSIONAneurysms associated with AVMs are at risk for rupture before, during, and immediately after treatment of the AVMs. New aneurysms may arise in patients with high-flow AVMs. The risk of intracranial hemorrhage from either source is higher in female patients. To reduce the complications of intracranial hemorrhage in these patients, we recommend a management protocol designed to treat the aneurysms by surgical or endovascular means before administering definitive therapy for the AVMs. Meticulous intraoperative blood pressure control and fluid management during aneurysm surgery is critical to avoid hemorrhage from the AVMs.

Journal

NeurosurgeryOxford University Press

Published: Aug 1, 1998

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial