The importance of language

The importance of language Journal of Hip Preservation Surgery Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 1–2 doi: 10.1093/jhps/hny002 Editorial EDITORIAL There is a problem with being English and that, you see, is The appearance of key publications in a non-English my language. Somehow it has become the lingua franca of journal has on occasion been dangerous. Remember science. Strange when one considers that 1197 million H5N1, bird ‘flu? Chinese researchers reported it in January speak Chinese, 399 million Spanish and English can only 2004 [9] based on their findings in south-eastern China in boast 335 million. It is the third largest language in the 2003. The English-speaking world thought not to look and world [1]. But the number of people speaking is one thing; it took until August 2004, when the paper’s authors had where it is spoken is another—101 countries and territo- presented their findings at an international symposium in ries worldwide, in 94 of which English is the official lan- Beijing that the word was out. Only then did the World guage. And if you count those for whom English is a Health Organisation and UN Food and Agriculture second language, then 335 million becomes 1 billion in an Organisation swing into action. All because the original instant. English must not relax, however, as French is on paper had been in Chinese and no one had done their its tail. By 2050, 750 million will be Francophones [2], reading. surpassing English in an instant. Of course, these observations do not apply to JHPS as To submit a paper in well-constructed English is clearly the journal is in English, and yet I am constantly impressed of paramount importance, a requirement that is unlikely to at the tremendous linguistic abilities among our non- disappear. The first shot is the best shot and many, in a English authors. Truth be known, there are a few authors host of specialties, have looked at the use of English and its from non-English lands whose English is better than a influence on acceptance, influence, outcome and impact. native Brit. Some of our non-English authors follow lan- Although actual knowledge of English is not always critical, guage by the book. English or non-English, what struck me as interesting in the use of third-party language editing is an advantage, as is our last issue, issue 4.4? Well everything, of course, other- the assistance of an advisor with a high h-index [3]. wise we would never have published. However, the treat- Journals have discovered that a larger share of English- language articles in multi-language medical journals is ment algorithm for ischiofemoral impingement by associated with greater international recognition and fewer Gollwitzer et al.[10] was certainly fascinating, especially self-citations [4]. with my impression that we are diagnosing this entity But although English is widely employed in the scien- more frequently than a few years ago. Meanwhile it was tific literature, some studies have shown up to 35.6% of sci- good to learn that the longer one dallied before undertak- entific publications may not be in the English language [5]. ing surgery for FAI, the less likely one was to have a satis- The problem is, citation frequency appears integrally factory result. Thank you, Dierckman et al. [11] for that linked to the language used, papers in English having a 6- one. By all means wait and see, but do not wait for ever. or 7-fold higher chance of citation than papers in German And for this issue, issue 5.1? Again, I am spoiled for or French [6]. If you decide to submit in Spanish to a choice but I have much enjoyed the increasing contribu- Spanish journal, and the journal turns you down, work has tions from our open surgery colleagues. Papers are coming shown there is a lesser chance of another publication in from them quick and fast. So, no wonder I was held accepting you [7]. Some have even recommended that spellbound by the Case Report from Sloan and Kamath non-English language journals change their publication lan- [12], who used dermal allograft in a Colonna arthroplasty guage, or at least adopt a bilingual approach, as English lan- when managing a chronic dislocation. And how about the guage is associated with a higher impact factor [8], that detailed debate offered by Thanacharoenpanich et al. [13] key metric that we all love to hate. as to whether arthroscopy or arthrotomy is required at a V C The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jhps/article-abstract/5/1/1/4838320 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018 2  Editorial 5. Amano T, Gonza´lez-Varo JP, Sutherland WJ. Languages are still a periacetabular osteotomy? They appear to leave the way barrier to global science. PLoS Biol 2016; 14: e2000933. open for both. 6. Poomkottayil D, Bornstein MM, Sendi P. Lost in translation: the So, as ever, please enjoy this issue of JHPS. It is pub- impact of publication language on citation frequency in the scien- lished for you, the hip preservation practitioner, and is tific dental literature. Swiss Med Wkly 2011; 141: w13148. filled from cover to cover with brilliance. I commend this 7. Matı´as-Guiu JA, Garcıˆa-Ramos Castellanos M et al. What hap- issue to you in its entirety. pens to medical articles submitted in Spanish that are not My very best wishes to you all. accepted for publication? Neuorlogı´a 2013; 28: 205–11. 8. Vinther S, Rosenberg J. Impact factor trends for general medical journals: non-English-language journals are lagging behind. Swiss Richard (Ricky) Villar Med Wkly 2012; 142: w13572. Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Hip Preservation Surgery 9. Haiyan L, Kangzhen Y, Huanliang Y et al. Isolation and character- ization of H5N1 and H9N2 influenza viruses from pigs in China. Chin J Prev Vet Med 2004; 26: 1–6. REFERENCES 10. Gollwitzer H, Banke IJ, Schauwecker J et al. How to address ischiofemoral impingement? Treatment algorithm and review of 1. Available at: http://mentalfloss.com/article/67766/worlds-top-20- the literature. J Hip Preserv Surg 2017; 4: 289–98. languages-and-words-english-has-borrowed-them. Accessed: 16 11. Dierckman BD, Ni J, Hohn EA, Domb BG. Does duration of January 2018. symptoms affect clinical outcome after hip arthroscopy for labral 2. Available at: https://www.forbes.com/sites/pascalemmanuelgobry/ tears? Analysis of prospectively collected outcomes with mini- 2014/03/21/want-to-know-the-language-of-the-future-the-data-sug mum 2-year follow-up. J Hip Preserv Surg 2017; 4: 308–17. gests-it-could-be-french/#4e5bf0426d58. Accessed: 16 January 2018. 12. Sloan M, Kamath AF. Capsular augmentation in Colonna arthro- 3. Cunha A, dos Santos B, Dias AM et al. Success in publication by graduate students in psychiatry in Brazil: an empirical evaluation plasty for the management of chronic hip dislocation. J Hip of the relative influence of English proficiency and advisor exper- Preserv Surg 2018; 5: 34–8. tise. BMC Med Educ 2014; 14: 238. 13. Thanacharoenpanich S, Boyle MJ, Murphy RF et al. 4. Diekhoff T, Schlattmann P, Dewey M. Impact of article language Periacetabular osteotomy for developmental hip dysplasia with in multi-language medical journals—a bibliometric analysis of labral tears: is arthrotomy or arthroscopy required? J Hip Preserv self-citations and impact factor. PLoS One 2013; 8: e76816. Surg 2018; 5: 23–33. Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jhps/article-abstract/5/1/1/4838320 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Hip Preservation Surgery Oxford University Press

The importance of language

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Abstract

Journal of Hip Preservation Surgery Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 1–2 doi: 10.1093/jhps/hny002 Editorial EDITORIAL There is a problem with being English and that, you see, is The appearance of key publications in a non-English my language. Somehow it has become the lingua franca of journal has on occasion been dangerous. Remember science. Strange when one considers that 1197 million H5N1, bird ‘flu? Chinese researchers reported it in January speak Chinese, 399 million Spanish and English can only 2004 [9] based on their findings in south-eastern China in boast 335 million. It is the third largest language in the 2003. The English-speaking world thought not to look and world [1]. But the number of people speaking is one thing; it took until August 2004, when the paper’s authors had where it is spoken is another—101 countries and territo- presented their findings at an international symposium in ries worldwide, in 94 of which English is the official lan- Beijing that the word was out. Only then did the World guage. And if you count those for whom English is a Health Organisation and UN Food and Agriculture second language, then 335 million becomes 1 billion in an Organisation swing into action. All because the original instant. English must not relax, however, as French is on paper had been in Chinese and no one had done their its tail. By 2050, 750 million will be Francophones [2], reading. surpassing English in an instant. Of course, these observations do not apply to JHPS as To submit a paper in well-constructed English is clearly the journal is in English, and yet I am constantly impressed of paramount importance, a requirement that is unlikely to at the tremendous linguistic abilities among our non- disappear. The first shot is the best shot and many, in a English authors. Truth be known, there are a few authors host of specialties, have looked at the use of English and its from non-English lands whose English is better than a influence on acceptance, influence, outcome and impact. native Brit. Some of our non-English authors follow lan- Although actual knowledge of English is not always critical, guage by the book. English or non-English, what struck me as interesting in the use of third-party language editing is an advantage, as is our last issue, issue 4.4? Well everything, of course, other- the assistance of an advisor with a high h-index [3]. wise we would never have published. However, the treat- Journals have discovered that a larger share of English- language articles in multi-language medical journals is ment algorithm for ischiofemoral impingement by associated with greater international recognition and fewer Gollwitzer et al.[10] was certainly fascinating, especially self-citations [4]. with my impression that we are diagnosing this entity But although English is widely employed in the scien- more frequently than a few years ago. Meanwhile it was tific literature, some studies have shown up to 35.6% of sci- good to learn that the longer one dallied before undertak- entific publications may not be in the English language [5]. ing surgery for FAI, the less likely one was to have a satis- The problem is, citation frequency appears integrally factory result. Thank you, Dierckman et al. [11] for that linked to the language used, papers in English having a 6- one. By all means wait and see, but do not wait for ever. or 7-fold higher chance of citation than papers in German And for this issue, issue 5.1? Again, I am spoiled for or French [6]. If you decide to submit in Spanish to a choice but I have much enjoyed the increasing contribu- Spanish journal, and the journal turns you down, work has tions from our open surgery colleagues. Papers are coming shown there is a lesser chance of another publication in from them quick and fast. So, no wonder I was held accepting you [7]. Some have even recommended that spellbound by the Case Report from Sloan and Kamath non-English language journals change their publication lan- [12], who used dermal allograft in a Colonna arthroplasty guage, or at least adopt a bilingual approach, as English lan- when managing a chronic dislocation. And how about the guage is associated with a higher impact factor [8], that detailed debate offered by Thanacharoenpanich et al. [13] key metric that we all love to hate. as to whether arthroscopy or arthrotomy is required at a V C The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jhps/article-abstract/5/1/1/4838320 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018 2  Editorial 5. Amano T, Gonza´lez-Varo JP, Sutherland WJ. Languages are still a periacetabular osteotomy? They appear to leave the way barrier to global science. PLoS Biol 2016; 14: e2000933. open for both. 6. Poomkottayil D, Bornstein MM, Sendi P. Lost in translation: the So, as ever, please enjoy this issue of JHPS. It is pub- impact of publication language on citation frequency in the scien- lished for you, the hip preservation practitioner, and is tific dental literature. Swiss Med Wkly 2011; 141: w13148. filled from cover to cover with brilliance. I commend this 7. Matı´as-Guiu JA, Garcıˆa-Ramos Castellanos M et al. What hap- issue to you in its entirety. pens to medical articles submitted in Spanish that are not My very best wishes to you all. accepted for publication? Neuorlogı´a 2013; 28: 205–11. 8. Vinther S, Rosenberg J. Impact factor trends for general medical journals: non-English-language journals are lagging behind. Swiss Richard (Ricky) Villar Med Wkly 2012; 142: w13572. Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Hip Preservation Surgery 9. Haiyan L, Kangzhen Y, Huanliang Y et al. Isolation and character- ization of H5N1 and H9N2 influenza viruses from pigs in China. Chin J Prev Vet Med 2004; 26: 1–6. REFERENCES 10. Gollwitzer H, Banke IJ, Schauwecker J et al. How to address ischiofemoral impingement? Treatment algorithm and review of 1. Available at: http://mentalfloss.com/article/67766/worlds-top-20- the literature. J Hip Preserv Surg 2017; 4: 289–98. languages-and-words-english-has-borrowed-them. Accessed: 16 11. Dierckman BD, Ni J, Hohn EA, Domb BG. Does duration of January 2018. symptoms affect clinical outcome after hip arthroscopy for labral 2. Available at: https://www.forbes.com/sites/pascalemmanuelgobry/ tears? Analysis of prospectively collected outcomes with mini- 2014/03/21/want-to-know-the-language-of-the-future-the-data-sug mum 2-year follow-up. J Hip Preserv Surg 2017; 4: 308–17. gests-it-could-be-french/#4e5bf0426d58. Accessed: 16 January 2018. 12. Sloan M, Kamath AF. Capsular augmentation in Colonna arthro- 3. Cunha A, dos Santos B, Dias AM et al. Success in publication by graduate students in psychiatry in Brazil: an empirical evaluation plasty for the management of chronic hip dislocation. J Hip of the relative influence of English proficiency and advisor exper- Preserv Surg 2018; 5: 34–8. tise. BMC Med Educ 2014; 14: 238. 13. Thanacharoenpanich S, Boyle MJ, Murphy RF et al. 4. Diekhoff T, Schlattmann P, Dewey M. Impact of article language Periacetabular osteotomy for developmental hip dysplasia with in multi-language medical journals—a bibliometric analysis of labral tears: is arthrotomy or arthroscopy required? J Hip Preserv self-citations and impact factor. PLoS One 2013; 8: e76816. Surg 2018; 5: 23–33. Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jhps/article-abstract/5/1/1/4838320 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018

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Journal of Hip Preservation SurgeryOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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