The impact of non-persistence on the direct and indirect costs in patients treated with subcutaneous tumour necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors in Germany

The impact of non-persistence on the direct and indirect costs in patients treated with... Abstract Objective The goal of the present study was to estimate the treatment costs in immune-mediated rheumatic disease patients initiating treatment with an s.c. biologic agent based on treatment persistence. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study based on the German statutory health insurance funds database. Patients ⩾18 years of age with a diagnosis of AS, PsA or RA treated with s.c. TNF-α inhibitors (TNFis) were included. Persistence was estimated as the duration of time from s.c. TNFi therapy initiation to discontinuation, which was defined as at least 60 days without therapy. We performed 1:1 matching based on a propensity score that was constructed as the conditional probability of being persistent as a function of age, gender, index year, physician specialty and Charlson comorbidity index. Finally, the cost differences between the matched pairs were estimated using the Wilcoxon test. Results After 1:1 matching, 678 persistent and 678 non-persistent patients were available for cost analyses. Using a 2-year time period, the costs for office-based visits per patient were €2319 in the persistent cohort compared with €3094 in the non-persistent cohort (P < 0.001). Co-medication costs were €2828 in the persistent cohort compared with €5498 in the non-persistent cohort, hospitalization costs were €3551 in the persistent cohort compared with €5890 in the non-persistent cohort and sick leave costs were €717 in the persistent cohort compared with €1241 in the non-persistent cohort (all P < 0.001). Conclusion The results of this study indicate that persistence with s.c. TNFi treatment can be associated with several cost offsets for immune-mediated rheumatic disease patients. IMRD, persistence, TNF-α, blocker, treatment costs Rheumatology key messages Biologic treatment persistence is associated with several cost offsets for immune-mediated rheumatic disease patients. In immune-mediated rheumatic disease patients, direct medical costs were lower in the persistent cohort. Introduction AS, PsA and RA are chronic progressive immune-mediated rheumatic diseases (IMRDs) that can cause pain, deformity and disability and progressively impair joint structure and function [1]. IMRDs result in substantial personal as well as economic burden [2]. The primary treatment goal for all three conditions is to maximize health-related quality of life by controlling symptoms and inflammation, preventing progressive structural damage, preserving or normalizing function and social participation and targeting remission. Treatment of rheumatic diseases usually involves a multimodal approach including both pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies [3, 4]. The advent of biologic medications such as s.c. TNF-α inhibitors (TNFis) has transformed the management of IMRDs [5]. Previous research has provided high-quality evidence that anti-TNF agents improve clinical symptoms in the treatment of IMRDs [6–8]. Taking the prescribed medication for a sufficient period of time is crucial to the success of any therapy. Non-compliance and a lack of persistence with prescription medications are major problems in the clinical management of chronic diseases and s.c. TNFi treatment is potentially a very convenient option for patients. However, patients may likely have drug interruptions or long periods of non-persistence. In IMRDs, treatment persistence can be used to represent drug effectiveness, safety and treatment satisfaction [9–11]. While associations between adherence and costs [12] and the cost impact of switching from an s.c. TNFi to different biologic classes have been examined [5, 13], studies estimating the cost impact of non-persistence in patients treated with s.c. TNFis for IMRDs are lacking. In 2016, Dalén et al. [14] analysed treatment costs in first-line (bio-naïve) IMRD patients in Sweden based on persistent and non-persistent patients. The results of their study indicated that persistence with s.c. TNFi treatment may be associated with some cost offsets for IMRD patients. In 2017, Dalén et al. [15] further showed that, in second-line therapy with s.c. TNFis, persistent patients had lower mean total costs. In the same year, Svedbom et al. [16] described and compared treatment persistence with first- and second-line s.c. TNFis as well as their corresponding costs in Sweden. Although these works are of great interest, no recent data are available about the association between non-persistence with s.c. TNFis and costs in Germany. The goal of the present study was to estimate and compare the direct and indirect treatment costs in IMRD patients initiating treatment with an s.c. biologic agent based on treatment persistence. Methods Data source This study is a retrospective cohort study based on the German statutory health insurance funds database. This database continuously provides data pertaining to about five million statutorily insured people, which corresponds to 7% coverage. Exclusively anonymous information and no personal data (in accordance with § 3 Abs. 6 German Federal Data Protection Act) are used. Each patient with defined characteristics (e.g. specific disease, number and/or durations of hospitalizations, prescriptions of specific medications or any combination of these characteristics) can be tracked within the database via a unique patient ID. Finally, the database has already been used in several epidemiological studies, including cost analyses [17]. General informed consent Informed patient consent German law allows the use of anonymous electronic medical records for research purposes under certain conditions. Because patients were only queried as aggregates and no protected health information was available for queries, no institutional review board approval was required for the use of this database or completion of this study. For this study, we only used anonymized data collected from the claims database. Therefore, this study does not require that we obtain informed consent from patients. Study population Patients ⩾18 years of age with a diagnosis of RA [International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) M05, M06], PsA (ICD-10 L40.5 in combination with M07.0, M07.1, M07.2, M07.3 or M09.0) or AS (ICD-10 M45) treated with any of the four s.c. TNF-α blockers of interest (etanercept, adalimumab, certolizumab pegol or golimumab) were selected. Patients were categorized by their main diagnosis at the index date (the diagnosis that is documented within the quarter of the index prescription date). Cases with more than one documented diagnosis were classified as a mixed group. The date of the first qualifying prescription for an s.c. biologic agent served as the patient’s index date. The 12-month period immediately preceding the index date was used as the pre-index period and the 12-month period following the final prescription within the persistence period served as the post-index period, which lasted no later than December 2015. All patients were traceable in the database for at least 12 months after their last prescription within the analysis period. The pre-index period and index date were used to measure patients’ baseline characteristics. Treatment persistence with index s.c. TNF-α blockers and health care resource utilization (such as services and direct and indirect costs) were evaluated in both the persistence and post-index periods. Persistence definition and patient stratification Persistence was defined as the duration of time from s.c. TNFi therapy initiation to discontinuation, which was identified as at least 60 days without s.c. TNFi therapy. A longitudinal dataset of medication supply was created for each individual patient and the number of days of drug supply was calculated based on the defined daily dose information associated with each prescription record. The persistence was evaluated at 24 months after the index date. Following this estimation of persistence, patients were categorized into persistent and non-persistent cohorts. The main outcome of the study was rheumatoid disease–related health care resource utilization costs, including direct costs and services. These costs were estimated for the time within 2 years (730 days) following the first s.c. TNFi prescription and separated by RA, PsA and AS indication. Direct costs included hospitalization costs, doctor and hospital visit costs, prescribed medication costs and sickness benefits (in Germany, sickness funds are obligated to provide sick pay for sick leaves of at least 43 days). Services consisted of the number of hospital stays, duration of hospitalization, medical department of the hospital involved and specialties visited. Covariates Demographic characteristics of patients at the index date included age (as a continuous variable and age groups) and gender. Further baseline variables were year of index date and the specialty of the physician initiating treatment. Furthermore, a revised version of the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) was used as a generic marker of comorbidity. Statistical methods To control for confounding, 1:1 matching was carried out based on a propensity score that was constructed as the conditional probability of being persistent as a function of age, gender, index year, physician specialty and CCI (logistic regression). Greedy matching was used by choosing a non-persistent patient whose propensity score was closest to that of this randomly selected persistent subject for matching. Descriptive statistics were given and group differences (persistent vs non-persistent) were assessed using the Wilcoxon test or the McNemar’s tests after propensity score matching. Finally, the differences in direct costs, indirect costs and services between matched pairs were estimated using the Wilcoxon test. Results Patient characteristics A total of 2060 patients initiating s.c. TNFi therapy were included in the study. After 2 years of follow-up, 682 patients still received s.c. TNFi therapy and 1378 patients had discontinued therapy. In the cohort of non-persistent patients, the mean persistence duration was 266 days (s.d. 190). We observed no significant difference between persistent and non-persistent patients in terms of age, gender or year of therapy initiation. Non-persistent patients had a slightly worse average health status compared with the persistent cohort (CCI 2.6 vs 2.4) (Table 1). After 1:1 matching, 678 pairs (678 persistent and 678 non-persistent patients) were available for cost analyses. Both cohorts were similar in terms of age, gender, year of therapy initiation, CCI and indication (Table 1). Table 1 Baseline characteristics of study patients before and after matching Variable Before matching After matching Persistent Non-persistent P-value Persistent Non-persistent P-value Total (N) 682  1378 678  678 Indication     RA (%) 55.7 58.8 0.040 55.9 57.2 0.520     AS (%) 21.7 19.9 0.579 21.8 21.7 1.000     PsA (%) 10.7 8.1 0.277 10.3 8.7 0.454     Mixed (%) 11.9 13.3 0.369 11.9 12.4 0.803 Age, mean (s.d.), years 51.1 (13.2) 51.4 (14.1) 0.669 51.1 (13.2) 51.2 (14.0) 0.905 Gender, male, % 42.4 41.1 0.572 42.5 44.0 0.583 Index year, %     2010 29.6 25.7 0.305 29.4 29.4 0.854     2011 23.6 24.5 23.6 25.5     2012 24.5 25.9 24.6 23.6     2013 22.3 23.9 22.4 21.5 CCI, mean (s.d.) 2.4 (1.3) 2.6 (1.6) <0.001 2.0 (1.3) 2.0 (1.3) 0.9227 Variable Before matching After matching Persistent Non-persistent P-value Persistent Non-persistent P-value Total (N) 682  1378 678  678 Indication     RA (%) 55.7 58.8 0.040 55.9 57.2 0.520     AS (%) 21.7 19.9 0.579 21.8 21.7 1.000     PsA (%) 10.7 8.1 0.277 10.3 8.7 0.454     Mixed (%) 11.9 13.3 0.369 11.9 12.4 0.803 Age, mean (s.d.), years 51.1 (13.2) 51.4 (14.1) 0.669 51.1 (13.2) 51.2 (14.0) 0.905 Gender, male, % 42.4 41.1 0.572 42.5 44.0 0.583 Index year, %     2010 29.6 25.7 0.305 29.4 29.4 0.854     2011 23.6 24.5 23.6 25.5     2012 24.5 25.9 24.6 23.6     2013 22.3 23.9 22.4 21.5 CCI, mean (s.d.) 2.4 (1.3) 2.6 (1.6) <0.001 2.0 (1.3) 2.0 (1.3) 0.9227 CCI: Charlson comorbidity index. Table 1 Baseline characteristics of study patients before and after matching Variable Before matching After matching Persistent Non-persistent P-value Persistent Non-persistent P-value Total (N) 682  1378 678  678 Indication     RA (%) 55.7 58.8 0.040 55.9 57.2 0.520     AS (%) 21.7 19.9 0.579 21.8 21.7 1.000     PsA (%) 10.7 8.1 0.277 10.3 8.7 0.454     Mixed (%) 11.9 13.3 0.369 11.9 12.4 0.803 Age, mean (s.d.), years 51.1 (13.2) 51.4 (14.1) 0.669 51.1 (13.2) 51.2 (14.0) 0.905 Gender, male, % 42.4 41.1 0.572 42.5 44.0 0.583 Index year, %     2010 29.6 25.7 0.305 29.4 29.4 0.854     2011 23.6 24.5 23.6 25.5     2012 24.5 25.9 24.6 23.6     2013 22.3 23.9 22.4 21.5 CCI, mean (s.d.) 2.4 (1.3) 2.6 (1.6) <0.001 2.0 (1.3) 2.0 (1.3) 0.9227 Variable Before matching After matching Persistent Non-persistent P-value Persistent Non-persistent P-value Total (N) 682  1378 678  678 Indication     RA (%) 55.7 58.8 0.040 55.9 57.2 0.520     AS (%) 21.7 19.9 0.579 21.8 21.7 1.000     PsA (%) 10.7 8.1 0.277 10.3 8.7 0.454     Mixed (%) 11.9 13.3 0.369 11.9 12.4 0.803 Age, mean (s.d.), years 51.1 (13.2) 51.4 (14.1) 0.669 51.1 (13.2) 51.2 (14.0) 0.905 Gender, male, % 42.4 41.1 0.572 42.5 44.0 0.583 Index year, %     2010 29.6 25.7 0.305 29.4 29.4 0.854     2011 23.6 24.5 23.6 25.5     2012 24.5 25.9 24.6 23.6     2013 22.3 23.9 22.4 21.5 CCI, mean (s.d.) 2.4 (1.3) 2.6 (1.6) <0.001 2.0 (1.3) 2.0 (1.3) 0.9227 CCI: Charlson comorbidity index. Cost analyses Table 2 shows the mean per-patient costs in the persistent and non-persistent cohorts. The costs for office-based visits per patient were €2319 in the persistent cohort and €3094 in the non-persistent cohort (P < 0.001). The cost difference was the highest in the mixed indication group (Table 2). An average persistent patient received prescriptions of different co-medications worth €2828 and a non-persistent patient received prescriptions worth €5498 within the 2-year time period (P < 0.001). In this category, the highest cost difference was found for patients with RA. Hospitalization costs were €3551 per persistent patient and €5890 per non-persistent patients (Table 2), which was probably due to the longer average duration of hospitalization in the non-persistent cohort. Furthermore, sick leave costs were much lower in persistent (€717) vs non-persistent (€1241) patients. Total costs per patient (excluding the cost of s.c. TNFi therapy) were ∼€6634 lower in the persistent cohort (Table 2). Table 2 Average costs per patient within 2 years after initiation of s.c. TNFi therapy in persistent and non-persistent patients Indication Non-persistent, mean (s.d.), €; Persistent, mean (s.d.), € Cost difference P-value Office-based visits     Total 3094 (4601) 2319 (2021) 775 <0.001     RA 3388 (5642) 2426 (1884) 962 0.005     AS 2447 (2261) 1809 (1573) 638 0.001     PsA 2152 (1563) 2897 (3321) −745 0.387     Mixed 3530 (3407) 2249 (1701) 1281 0.012 Prescriptions (excluding TNF-α)     Total 5492 (9876) 2828 (13 332) 2664 <0.001     RA 6914 (10 109) 3183 (15 788) 3731 <0.001     AS 2369 (6719) 2807 (12 982) −438 0.615     PsA 4621 (12 388) 1998 (3237) 2623 0.985     Mixed 5003 (10 245) 1921 (2376) 3082 0.662 Prescriptions (including TNF-α)     Total 27 222 (13 902) 43 707 (14 254) −16 485 <0.001     RA 27 979 (13 418) 43 759 (16 403) −15 780 <0.001     AS 24 561 (13 857) 43 926 (14 772) −19 365 <0.001     PsA 30 223 (15 197) 43 629 (5319) −13 407 <0.001     Mixed 26 271 (14 676) 43 127 (4727) −16 856 <0.001 Service utilization     Total 2475 (8010) 2142 (7216) 333 0.079     RA 3125 (9920) 2142 (6760) 983 0.007     AS 1011 (2478) 2326 (9589) −1315 0.422     PsA 1722 (4572) 1165 (2904) 557 0.925     Mixed 2564 (5732) 2649 (6884) −85 0.117 Hospitalizations     Total 5890 (14 951) 3552 (11 135) 2338 <0.001     RA 6869 (13 868) 4189 (12 930) 2680 <0.001     AS 3051 (7323) 2027 (6708) 1024 0.157     PsA 8862 (31 399) 3466 (11 076) 5396 0.249     Mixed 4252 (10 753) 3429 (8027) 823 0.490 Costs associated with sick leave     Total 1241 (3774) 717 (2784) 524 0.011     RA 1342 (3918) 620 (2852) 722 0.007     AS 997 (3514) 1072 (2982) −75 0.386     PsA 1330 (4525) 594 (1689) 736 0.937     Mixed 1135 (2898) 629 (2844) 506 0.007 Total costs (excluding TNF-α)     Total 18 192 (24 628) 11 558 (20 823) 6634 <0.001     RA 21 637 (25 851) 12 561 (23 801) 9076 <0.001     AS 9875 (12 416) 10 042 (19 240) −167 0.143     PsA 18 687 (36 880) 10 119 (13 312) 8568 0.444     Mixed 16 485 (20 702) 10 877 (12 175) 5608 0.169 Total costs (including TNF-α)     Total 39 922 (25 670) 52 437 (21 521) −12 515 <0.001     RA 42 703 (26 436) 53 138 (24 119) −10 435 <0.001     AS 32 068 (17 211) 51 160 (21 153) −19 092 <0.001     PsA 44 289 (37 175) 51 751 (14 273) −7462 <0.001     Mixed 37 753 (21 575) 52 083 (12 929) −14 330 <0.001 Indication Non-persistent, mean (s.d.), €; Persistent, mean (s.d.), € Cost difference P-value Office-based visits     Total 3094 (4601) 2319 (2021) 775 <0.001     RA 3388 (5642) 2426 (1884) 962 0.005     AS 2447 (2261) 1809 (1573) 638 0.001     PsA 2152 (1563) 2897 (3321) −745 0.387     Mixed 3530 (3407) 2249 (1701) 1281 0.012 Prescriptions (excluding TNF-α)     Total 5492 (9876) 2828 (13 332) 2664 <0.001     RA 6914 (10 109) 3183 (15 788) 3731 <0.001     AS 2369 (6719) 2807 (12 982) −438 0.615     PsA 4621 (12 388) 1998 (3237) 2623 0.985     Mixed 5003 (10 245) 1921 (2376) 3082 0.662 Prescriptions (including TNF-α)     Total 27 222 (13 902) 43 707 (14 254) −16 485 <0.001     RA 27 979 (13 418) 43 759 (16 403) −15 780 <0.001     AS 24 561 (13 857) 43 926 (14 772) −19 365 <0.001     PsA 30 223 (15 197) 43 629 (5319) −13 407 <0.001     Mixed 26 271 (14 676) 43 127 (4727) −16 856 <0.001 Service utilization     Total 2475 (8010) 2142 (7216) 333 0.079     RA 3125 (9920) 2142 (6760) 983 0.007     AS 1011 (2478) 2326 (9589) −1315 0.422     PsA 1722 (4572) 1165 (2904) 557 0.925     Mixed 2564 (5732) 2649 (6884) −85 0.117 Hospitalizations     Total 5890 (14 951) 3552 (11 135) 2338 <0.001     RA 6869 (13 868) 4189 (12 930) 2680 <0.001     AS 3051 (7323) 2027 (6708) 1024 0.157     PsA 8862 (31 399) 3466 (11 076) 5396 0.249     Mixed 4252 (10 753) 3429 (8027) 823 0.490 Costs associated with sick leave     Total 1241 (3774) 717 (2784) 524 0.011     RA 1342 (3918) 620 (2852) 722 0.007     AS 997 (3514) 1072 (2982) −75 0.386     PsA 1330 (4525) 594 (1689) 736 0.937     Mixed 1135 (2898) 629 (2844) 506 0.007 Total costs (excluding TNF-α)     Total 18 192 (24 628) 11 558 (20 823) 6634 <0.001     RA 21 637 (25 851) 12 561 (23 801) 9076 <0.001     AS 9875 (12 416) 10 042 (19 240) −167 0.143     PsA 18 687 (36 880) 10 119 (13 312) 8568 0.444     Mixed 16 485 (20 702) 10 877 (12 175) 5608 0.169 Total costs (including TNF-α)     Total 39 922 (25 670) 52 437 (21 521) −12 515 <0.001     RA 42 703 (26 436) 53 138 (24 119) −10 435 <0.001     AS 32 068 (17 211) 51 160 (21 153) −19 092 <0.001     PsA 44 289 (37 175) 51 751 (14 273) −7462 <0.001     Mixed 37 753 (21 575) 52 083 (12 929) −14 330 <0.001 Table 2 Average costs per patient within 2 years after initiation of s.c. TNFi therapy in persistent and non-persistent patients Indication Non-persistent, mean (s.d.), €; Persistent, mean (s.d.), € Cost difference P-value Office-based visits     Total 3094 (4601) 2319 (2021) 775 <0.001     RA 3388 (5642) 2426 (1884) 962 0.005     AS 2447 (2261) 1809 (1573) 638 0.001     PsA 2152 (1563) 2897 (3321) −745 0.387     Mixed 3530 (3407) 2249 (1701) 1281 0.012 Prescriptions (excluding TNF-α)     Total 5492 (9876) 2828 (13 332) 2664 <0.001     RA 6914 (10 109) 3183 (15 788) 3731 <0.001     AS 2369 (6719) 2807 (12 982) −438 0.615     PsA 4621 (12 388) 1998 (3237) 2623 0.985     Mixed 5003 (10 245) 1921 (2376) 3082 0.662 Prescriptions (including TNF-α)     Total 27 222 (13 902) 43 707 (14 254) −16 485 <0.001     RA 27 979 (13 418) 43 759 (16 403) −15 780 <0.001     AS 24 561 (13 857) 43 926 (14 772) −19 365 <0.001     PsA 30 223 (15 197) 43 629 (5319) −13 407 <0.001     Mixed 26 271 (14 676) 43 127 (4727) −16 856 <0.001 Service utilization     Total 2475 (8010) 2142 (7216) 333 0.079     RA 3125 (9920) 2142 (6760) 983 0.007     AS 1011 (2478) 2326 (9589) −1315 0.422     PsA 1722 (4572) 1165 (2904) 557 0.925     Mixed 2564 (5732) 2649 (6884) −85 0.117 Hospitalizations     Total 5890 (14 951) 3552 (11 135) 2338 <0.001     RA 6869 (13 868) 4189 (12 930) 2680 <0.001     AS 3051 (7323) 2027 (6708) 1024 0.157     PsA 8862 (31 399) 3466 (11 076) 5396 0.249     Mixed 4252 (10 753) 3429 (8027) 823 0.490 Costs associated with sick leave     Total 1241 (3774) 717 (2784) 524 0.011     RA 1342 (3918) 620 (2852) 722 0.007     AS 997 (3514) 1072 (2982) −75 0.386     PsA 1330 (4525) 594 (1689) 736 0.937     Mixed 1135 (2898) 629 (2844) 506 0.007 Total costs (excluding TNF-α)     Total 18 192 (24 628) 11 558 (20 823) 6634 <0.001     RA 21 637 (25 851) 12 561 (23 801) 9076 <0.001     AS 9875 (12 416) 10 042 (19 240) −167 0.143     PsA 18 687 (36 880) 10 119 (13 312) 8568 0.444     Mixed 16 485 (20 702) 10 877 (12 175) 5608 0.169 Total costs (including TNF-α)     Total 39 922 (25 670) 52 437 (21 521) −12 515 <0.001     RA 42 703 (26 436) 53 138 (24 119) −10 435 <0.001     AS 32 068 (17 211) 51 160 (21 153) −19 092 <0.001     PsA 44 289 (37 175) 51 751 (14 273) −7462 <0.001     Mixed 37 753 (21 575) 52 083 (12 929) −14 330 <0.001 Indication Non-persistent, mean (s.d.), €; Persistent, mean (s.d.), € Cost difference P-value Office-based visits     Total 3094 (4601) 2319 (2021) 775 <0.001     RA 3388 (5642) 2426 (1884) 962 0.005     AS 2447 (2261) 1809 (1573) 638 0.001     PsA 2152 (1563) 2897 (3321) −745 0.387     Mixed 3530 (3407) 2249 (1701) 1281 0.012 Prescriptions (excluding TNF-α)     Total 5492 (9876) 2828 (13 332) 2664 <0.001     RA 6914 (10 109) 3183 (15 788) 3731 <0.001     AS 2369 (6719) 2807 (12 982) −438 0.615     PsA 4621 (12 388) 1998 (3237) 2623 0.985     Mixed 5003 (10 245) 1921 (2376) 3082 0.662 Prescriptions (including TNF-α)     Total 27 222 (13 902) 43 707 (14 254) −16 485 <0.001     RA 27 979 (13 418) 43 759 (16 403) −15 780 <0.001     AS 24 561 (13 857) 43 926 (14 772) −19 365 <0.001     PsA 30 223 (15 197) 43 629 (5319) −13 407 <0.001     Mixed 26 271 (14 676) 43 127 (4727) −16 856 <0.001 Service utilization     Total 2475 (8010) 2142 (7216) 333 0.079     RA 3125 (9920) 2142 (6760) 983 0.007     AS 1011 (2478) 2326 (9589) −1315 0.422     PsA 1722 (4572) 1165 (2904) 557 0.925     Mixed 2564 (5732) 2649 (6884) −85 0.117 Hospitalizations     Total 5890 (14 951) 3552 (11 135) 2338 <0.001     RA 6869 (13 868) 4189 (12 930) 2680 <0.001     AS 3051 (7323) 2027 (6708) 1024 0.157     PsA 8862 (31 399) 3466 (11 076) 5396 0.249     Mixed 4252 (10 753) 3429 (8027) 823 0.490 Costs associated with sick leave     Total 1241 (3774) 717 (2784) 524 0.011     RA 1342 (3918) 620 (2852) 722 0.007     AS 997 (3514) 1072 (2982) −75 0.386     PsA 1330 (4525) 594 (1689) 736 0.937     Mixed 1135 (2898) 629 (2844) 506 0.007 Total costs (excluding TNF-α)     Total 18 192 (24 628) 11 558 (20 823) 6634 <0.001     RA 21 637 (25 851) 12 561 (23 801) 9076 <0.001     AS 9875 (12 416) 10 042 (19 240) −167 0.143     PsA 18 687 (36 880) 10 119 (13 312) 8568 0.444     Mixed 16 485 (20 702) 10 877 (12 175) 5608 0.169 Total costs (including TNF-α)     Total 39 922 (25 670) 52 437 (21 521) −12 515 <0.001     RA 42 703 (26 436) 53 138 (24 119) −10 435 <0.001     AS 32 068 (17 211) 51 160 (21 153) −19 092 <0.001     PsA 44 289 (37 175) 51 751 (14 273) −7462 <0.001     Mixed 37 753 (21 575) 52 083 (12 929) −14 330 <0.001 However, as expected, when including the cost of s.c. TNFi prescriptions, the total cost per patient was higher in the persistent cohort than in the non-persistent cohort (Table 2). Discussion This retrospective study of 1356 patients found that the 2-year costs per patient for office-based visits, hospitalizations, co-medications and sick leave costs were higher in patients who discontinued their s.c. TNFi therapy after an average of 9 months compared with patients with at least 24 months of therapy. Moreover, the average duration of hospitalization was longer in non-persistent patients. Since the database used does not include data on symptoms and diagnosis severity, costs can be used as a surrogate parameter for patients’ health status. Evidence regarding the share of patients who continued to do well after discontinuation of anti-TNF therapy is lacking. However, even if only some patients who discontinue s.c. TNFi therapy experience an increase in disease activity, this can result in more physician visits, longer hospitalizations and more days of sick leave. On the one hand, this can be caused by the IMRD symptoms themselves. On the other hand, increased time-averaged disease activity in RA can be associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events [18] as well as a higher probability of developing infections [19]. The difference in non-TNF medication in our study was ∼54%, which is in line with results of Dalen et al. [14] who reported a difference of 56%. Regardless of the diagnosis, but especially in the case of diseases accompanied by pain, better persistence and greater adherence is associated with a considerable reduction in cost. This does not refer to total costs but rather to co-therapy and hospitalizations. Therefore such cost savings provide indirect but clear evidence regarding quality of life. TNFi products are relatively costly and patients with longer treatment durations, that is, better persistence, receive a greater number of prescriptions, which leads to higher treatment costs, while at the same time reducing other costs (co-therapies, hospital, service utilization, sick leave costs). However, longer therapy can achieve an improvement in the quality of life of IMRD patients. Moreover, the value of good persistence can be considered in terms of benefits to all participants in the health care system, including health care providers and payers. Study limitations Each retrospective study is limited by the availability of data in this database. The specific markers or tests of disease severity and the reasons for discontinuation are not recorded in the database. Furthermore, analyses are based on data of the Betriebskrankenkasse insurance fund, which is only one of many insurance funds in Germany, and the patient characteristics of different funds may vary. Moreover, no privately insured patients are included in the analyses. Finally, this study used mean values for costs per patient. However, mean values are highly sensitive to outliers. In this study, service utilization costs in patients with AS were €1011 (s.d. 2478) in non-persistent and €2326 (s.d. 9589) in persistent patients, due to some outliers with very high costs in persistent patients. On the other side, the median costs were higher in non-persistent vs persistent patients (€262 vs €200), showing the role of outliers. The same statistical effect of outliers can be observed in office-based visit costs of patients with PsA. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that persistence with s.c. TNFi treatment can be associated with several cost offsets for IMRD patients, with an improvement in their quality of life. For health care providers and payers, these findings reinforce the value of persistence, given the additional economic burden associated with non-persistent patients. Funding: This study was funded by Merck & Co., Kenilworth, NJ, USA. The sponsor was involved with the writing, study design, analysis and interpretation of data. Disclosure statement: K.Z., K.K., M.H. and S.D. are employees of QuintilesIMS. QuintilesIMS were paid consultants to Merck & Co., Kenilworth, NJ USA, in conjunction with the development of this manuscript. M.F. and H.F. are employees of Team Gesundheit Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsmanagement. S.K. is an employee of Merck & Co., Kenilworth, NJ, USA, and holds stock and options. References 1 Silman AJ , Hochberg MC. Epidemiology of the rheumatic diseases . New York, USA : Oxford University Press , 2001 . 2 Smolen JS , Landewe R , Breedveld FC et al. EULAR recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis with synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs . Ann Rheum Dis 2010 ; 69 : 964 – 75 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 3 Braun J , Berg R , Boehm H et al. 2010 update of the ASAS/EULAR recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis . Ann Rheum Dis 2011 ; 70 : 896 – 904 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 4 Gossec L , Smolen JS , Gaujoux-Viala C et al. European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis with pharmacological therapies . Ann Rheum Dis 2012 ; 71 : 4 – 12 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 5 Stevens SR , Chang TH. History of development of TNF inhibitors . Basel, Switzerland : Springer , 2006 : 9 – 22 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS 6 Maxwell LJ , Zochling J , Boonen A et al. TNF-alpha inhibitors for ankylosing spondylitis . Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2015 ; 4 : CD005468 . 7 Aaltonen KJ , Virkki LM , Malmivaara A et al. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of existing TNF blocking agents in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis . PLoS One 2012 ; 7 : e30275 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 8 Lemos LL , de Oliveira Costa J , Almeida AM et al. Treatment of psoriatic arthritis with anti-TNF agents: a systematic review and meta-analysis of efficacy, effectiveness and safety . Rheumatol Int 2014 ; 34 : 1345 – 60 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 9 Aletaha D , Smolen JS. Effectiveness profiles and dose dependent retention of traditional disease modifying antirheumatic drugs for rheumatoid arthritis. An observational study . J Rheumatol 2002 ; 29 : 1631 – 8 . Google Scholar PubMed 10 Fries JF. Effectiveness and toxicity considerations in outcome directed therapy in rheumatoid arthritis . J Rheumatol Suppl 1996 ; 44 : 102 – 6 . Google Scholar PubMed 11 Pincus T , Marcum SB , Callahan LF. Long-term drug therapy for rheumatoid arthritis in seven rheumatology private practices: II. Second line drugs and prednisone . J Rheumatol 1992 ; 19 : 1885 – 94 . Google Scholar PubMed 12 Emery P , Keystone E , Tony HP et al. IL-6 receptor inhibition with tocilizumab improves treatment outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis refractory to anti-tumour necrosis factor biologicals: results from a 24-week multicentre randomised placebo-controlled trial . Ann Rheum Dis 2008 ; 67 : 1516 – 23 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 13 Salaffi F , Carotti M , Gasparini S , Intorcia M , Grassi W. The health-related quality of life in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis: a comparison with a selected sample of healthy people . Health Qual Life Outcomes 2009 ; 7 : 25 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 14 Dalén J , Svedbom A , Black CM et al. Treatment persistence among patients with immune-mediated rheumatic disease newly treated with subcutaneous TNF-alpha inhibitors and costs associated with non-persistence . Rheumatol Int 2016 ; 36 : 987 – 95 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 15 Dalén J , Svedbom A , Black CM , Kachroo S. Second-line treatment persistence and costs among patients with immune-mediated rheumatic diseases treated with subcutaneous TNF-alpha inhibitors . Rheumatol Int 2017 ; 37 : 2049 – 58 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 16 Svedbom A , Dalén J,M , Black CM , Kachroo S. Persistence and costs with subcutaneous TNF-alpha inhibitors in immune-mediated rheumatic disease stratified by treatment line . Patient Pref Adherence 2017 ; 11 : 95 – 106 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS 17 Friedel H , Delges A , Clouth J , Trautvetter DT. Expenditures of the German statutory health insurance system for patients suffering from acute coronary syndrome and treated with percutaneous coronary intervention . Eur J Health Econ 2010 ; 11 : 449 – 55 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 18 Solomon DH , Reed GW , Kremer JM et al. Disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis and the risk of cardiovascular events . Arthritis Rheumatol 2015 ; 67 : 1449 – 55 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 19 Au K , Reed G , Curtis JR et al. High disease activity is associated with an increased risk of infection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis . Ann Rheum Dis 2011 ; 70 : 785 – 91 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rheumatology Oxford University Press

The impact of non-persistence on the direct and indirect costs in patients treated with subcutaneous tumour necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors in Germany

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Oxford University Press
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© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
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1462-0324
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10.1093/rheumatology/key099
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Abstract

Abstract Objective The goal of the present study was to estimate the treatment costs in immune-mediated rheumatic disease patients initiating treatment with an s.c. biologic agent based on treatment persistence. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study based on the German statutory health insurance funds database. Patients ⩾18 years of age with a diagnosis of AS, PsA or RA treated with s.c. TNF-α inhibitors (TNFis) were included. Persistence was estimated as the duration of time from s.c. TNFi therapy initiation to discontinuation, which was defined as at least 60 days without therapy. We performed 1:1 matching based on a propensity score that was constructed as the conditional probability of being persistent as a function of age, gender, index year, physician specialty and Charlson comorbidity index. Finally, the cost differences between the matched pairs were estimated using the Wilcoxon test. Results After 1:1 matching, 678 persistent and 678 non-persistent patients were available for cost analyses. Using a 2-year time period, the costs for office-based visits per patient were €2319 in the persistent cohort compared with €3094 in the non-persistent cohort (P < 0.001). Co-medication costs were €2828 in the persistent cohort compared with €5498 in the non-persistent cohort, hospitalization costs were €3551 in the persistent cohort compared with €5890 in the non-persistent cohort and sick leave costs were €717 in the persistent cohort compared with €1241 in the non-persistent cohort (all P < 0.001). Conclusion The results of this study indicate that persistence with s.c. TNFi treatment can be associated with several cost offsets for immune-mediated rheumatic disease patients. IMRD, persistence, TNF-α, blocker, treatment costs Rheumatology key messages Biologic treatment persistence is associated with several cost offsets for immune-mediated rheumatic disease patients. In immune-mediated rheumatic disease patients, direct medical costs were lower in the persistent cohort. Introduction AS, PsA and RA are chronic progressive immune-mediated rheumatic diseases (IMRDs) that can cause pain, deformity and disability and progressively impair joint structure and function [1]. IMRDs result in substantial personal as well as economic burden [2]. The primary treatment goal for all three conditions is to maximize health-related quality of life by controlling symptoms and inflammation, preventing progressive structural damage, preserving or normalizing function and social participation and targeting remission. Treatment of rheumatic diseases usually involves a multimodal approach including both pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies [3, 4]. The advent of biologic medications such as s.c. TNF-α inhibitors (TNFis) has transformed the management of IMRDs [5]. Previous research has provided high-quality evidence that anti-TNF agents improve clinical symptoms in the treatment of IMRDs [6–8]. Taking the prescribed medication for a sufficient period of time is crucial to the success of any therapy. Non-compliance and a lack of persistence with prescription medications are major problems in the clinical management of chronic diseases and s.c. TNFi treatment is potentially a very convenient option for patients. However, patients may likely have drug interruptions or long periods of non-persistence. In IMRDs, treatment persistence can be used to represent drug effectiveness, safety and treatment satisfaction [9–11]. While associations between adherence and costs [12] and the cost impact of switching from an s.c. TNFi to different biologic classes have been examined [5, 13], studies estimating the cost impact of non-persistence in patients treated with s.c. TNFis for IMRDs are lacking. In 2016, Dalén et al. [14] analysed treatment costs in first-line (bio-naïve) IMRD patients in Sweden based on persistent and non-persistent patients. The results of their study indicated that persistence with s.c. TNFi treatment may be associated with some cost offsets for IMRD patients. In 2017, Dalén et al. [15] further showed that, in second-line therapy with s.c. TNFis, persistent patients had lower mean total costs. In the same year, Svedbom et al. [16] described and compared treatment persistence with first- and second-line s.c. TNFis as well as their corresponding costs in Sweden. Although these works are of great interest, no recent data are available about the association between non-persistence with s.c. TNFis and costs in Germany. The goal of the present study was to estimate and compare the direct and indirect treatment costs in IMRD patients initiating treatment with an s.c. biologic agent based on treatment persistence. Methods Data source This study is a retrospective cohort study based on the German statutory health insurance funds database. This database continuously provides data pertaining to about five million statutorily insured people, which corresponds to 7% coverage. Exclusively anonymous information and no personal data (in accordance with § 3 Abs. 6 German Federal Data Protection Act) are used. Each patient with defined characteristics (e.g. specific disease, number and/or durations of hospitalizations, prescriptions of specific medications or any combination of these characteristics) can be tracked within the database via a unique patient ID. Finally, the database has already been used in several epidemiological studies, including cost analyses [17]. General informed consent Informed patient consent German law allows the use of anonymous electronic medical records for research purposes under certain conditions. Because patients were only queried as aggregates and no protected health information was available for queries, no institutional review board approval was required for the use of this database or completion of this study. For this study, we only used anonymized data collected from the claims database. Therefore, this study does not require that we obtain informed consent from patients. Study population Patients ⩾18 years of age with a diagnosis of RA [International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) M05, M06], PsA (ICD-10 L40.5 in combination with M07.0, M07.1, M07.2, M07.3 or M09.0) or AS (ICD-10 M45) treated with any of the four s.c. TNF-α blockers of interest (etanercept, adalimumab, certolizumab pegol or golimumab) were selected. Patients were categorized by their main diagnosis at the index date (the diagnosis that is documented within the quarter of the index prescription date). Cases with more than one documented diagnosis were classified as a mixed group. The date of the first qualifying prescription for an s.c. biologic agent served as the patient’s index date. The 12-month period immediately preceding the index date was used as the pre-index period and the 12-month period following the final prescription within the persistence period served as the post-index period, which lasted no later than December 2015. All patients were traceable in the database for at least 12 months after their last prescription within the analysis period. The pre-index period and index date were used to measure patients’ baseline characteristics. Treatment persistence with index s.c. TNF-α blockers and health care resource utilization (such as services and direct and indirect costs) were evaluated in both the persistence and post-index periods. Persistence definition and patient stratification Persistence was defined as the duration of time from s.c. TNFi therapy initiation to discontinuation, which was identified as at least 60 days without s.c. TNFi therapy. A longitudinal dataset of medication supply was created for each individual patient and the number of days of drug supply was calculated based on the defined daily dose information associated with each prescription record. The persistence was evaluated at 24 months after the index date. Following this estimation of persistence, patients were categorized into persistent and non-persistent cohorts. The main outcome of the study was rheumatoid disease–related health care resource utilization costs, including direct costs and services. These costs were estimated for the time within 2 years (730 days) following the first s.c. TNFi prescription and separated by RA, PsA and AS indication. Direct costs included hospitalization costs, doctor and hospital visit costs, prescribed medication costs and sickness benefits (in Germany, sickness funds are obligated to provide sick pay for sick leaves of at least 43 days). Services consisted of the number of hospital stays, duration of hospitalization, medical department of the hospital involved and specialties visited. Covariates Demographic characteristics of patients at the index date included age (as a continuous variable and age groups) and gender. Further baseline variables were year of index date and the specialty of the physician initiating treatment. Furthermore, a revised version of the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) was used as a generic marker of comorbidity. Statistical methods To control for confounding, 1:1 matching was carried out based on a propensity score that was constructed as the conditional probability of being persistent as a function of age, gender, index year, physician specialty and CCI (logistic regression). Greedy matching was used by choosing a non-persistent patient whose propensity score was closest to that of this randomly selected persistent subject for matching. Descriptive statistics were given and group differences (persistent vs non-persistent) were assessed using the Wilcoxon test or the McNemar’s tests after propensity score matching. Finally, the differences in direct costs, indirect costs and services between matched pairs were estimated using the Wilcoxon test. Results Patient characteristics A total of 2060 patients initiating s.c. TNFi therapy were included in the study. After 2 years of follow-up, 682 patients still received s.c. TNFi therapy and 1378 patients had discontinued therapy. In the cohort of non-persistent patients, the mean persistence duration was 266 days (s.d. 190). We observed no significant difference between persistent and non-persistent patients in terms of age, gender or year of therapy initiation. Non-persistent patients had a slightly worse average health status compared with the persistent cohort (CCI 2.6 vs 2.4) (Table 1). After 1:1 matching, 678 pairs (678 persistent and 678 non-persistent patients) were available for cost analyses. Both cohorts were similar in terms of age, gender, year of therapy initiation, CCI and indication (Table 1). Table 1 Baseline characteristics of study patients before and after matching Variable Before matching After matching Persistent Non-persistent P-value Persistent Non-persistent P-value Total (N) 682  1378 678  678 Indication     RA (%) 55.7 58.8 0.040 55.9 57.2 0.520     AS (%) 21.7 19.9 0.579 21.8 21.7 1.000     PsA (%) 10.7 8.1 0.277 10.3 8.7 0.454     Mixed (%) 11.9 13.3 0.369 11.9 12.4 0.803 Age, mean (s.d.), years 51.1 (13.2) 51.4 (14.1) 0.669 51.1 (13.2) 51.2 (14.0) 0.905 Gender, male, % 42.4 41.1 0.572 42.5 44.0 0.583 Index year, %     2010 29.6 25.7 0.305 29.4 29.4 0.854     2011 23.6 24.5 23.6 25.5     2012 24.5 25.9 24.6 23.6     2013 22.3 23.9 22.4 21.5 CCI, mean (s.d.) 2.4 (1.3) 2.6 (1.6) <0.001 2.0 (1.3) 2.0 (1.3) 0.9227 Variable Before matching After matching Persistent Non-persistent P-value Persistent Non-persistent P-value Total (N) 682  1378 678  678 Indication     RA (%) 55.7 58.8 0.040 55.9 57.2 0.520     AS (%) 21.7 19.9 0.579 21.8 21.7 1.000     PsA (%) 10.7 8.1 0.277 10.3 8.7 0.454     Mixed (%) 11.9 13.3 0.369 11.9 12.4 0.803 Age, mean (s.d.), years 51.1 (13.2) 51.4 (14.1) 0.669 51.1 (13.2) 51.2 (14.0) 0.905 Gender, male, % 42.4 41.1 0.572 42.5 44.0 0.583 Index year, %     2010 29.6 25.7 0.305 29.4 29.4 0.854     2011 23.6 24.5 23.6 25.5     2012 24.5 25.9 24.6 23.6     2013 22.3 23.9 22.4 21.5 CCI, mean (s.d.) 2.4 (1.3) 2.6 (1.6) <0.001 2.0 (1.3) 2.0 (1.3) 0.9227 CCI: Charlson comorbidity index. Table 1 Baseline characteristics of study patients before and after matching Variable Before matching After matching Persistent Non-persistent P-value Persistent Non-persistent P-value Total (N) 682  1378 678  678 Indication     RA (%) 55.7 58.8 0.040 55.9 57.2 0.520     AS (%) 21.7 19.9 0.579 21.8 21.7 1.000     PsA (%) 10.7 8.1 0.277 10.3 8.7 0.454     Mixed (%) 11.9 13.3 0.369 11.9 12.4 0.803 Age, mean (s.d.), years 51.1 (13.2) 51.4 (14.1) 0.669 51.1 (13.2) 51.2 (14.0) 0.905 Gender, male, % 42.4 41.1 0.572 42.5 44.0 0.583 Index year, %     2010 29.6 25.7 0.305 29.4 29.4 0.854     2011 23.6 24.5 23.6 25.5     2012 24.5 25.9 24.6 23.6     2013 22.3 23.9 22.4 21.5 CCI, mean (s.d.) 2.4 (1.3) 2.6 (1.6) <0.001 2.0 (1.3) 2.0 (1.3) 0.9227 Variable Before matching After matching Persistent Non-persistent P-value Persistent Non-persistent P-value Total (N) 682  1378 678  678 Indication     RA (%) 55.7 58.8 0.040 55.9 57.2 0.520     AS (%) 21.7 19.9 0.579 21.8 21.7 1.000     PsA (%) 10.7 8.1 0.277 10.3 8.7 0.454     Mixed (%) 11.9 13.3 0.369 11.9 12.4 0.803 Age, mean (s.d.), years 51.1 (13.2) 51.4 (14.1) 0.669 51.1 (13.2) 51.2 (14.0) 0.905 Gender, male, % 42.4 41.1 0.572 42.5 44.0 0.583 Index year, %     2010 29.6 25.7 0.305 29.4 29.4 0.854     2011 23.6 24.5 23.6 25.5     2012 24.5 25.9 24.6 23.6     2013 22.3 23.9 22.4 21.5 CCI, mean (s.d.) 2.4 (1.3) 2.6 (1.6) <0.001 2.0 (1.3) 2.0 (1.3) 0.9227 CCI: Charlson comorbidity index. Cost analyses Table 2 shows the mean per-patient costs in the persistent and non-persistent cohorts. The costs for office-based visits per patient were €2319 in the persistent cohort and €3094 in the non-persistent cohort (P < 0.001). The cost difference was the highest in the mixed indication group (Table 2). An average persistent patient received prescriptions of different co-medications worth €2828 and a non-persistent patient received prescriptions worth €5498 within the 2-year time period (P < 0.001). In this category, the highest cost difference was found for patients with RA. Hospitalization costs were €3551 per persistent patient and €5890 per non-persistent patients (Table 2), which was probably due to the longer average duration of hospitalization in the non-persistent cohort. Furthermore, sick leave costs were much lower in persistent (€717) vs non-persistent (€1241) patients. Total costs per patient (excluding the cost of s.c. TNFi therapy) were ∼€6634 lower in the persistent cohort (Table 2). Table 2 Average costs per patient within 2 years after initiation of s.c. TNFi therapy in persistent and non-persistent patients Indication Non-persistent, mean (s.d.), €; Persistent, mean (s.d.), € Cost difference P-value Office-based visits     Total 3094 (4601) 2319 (2021) 775 <0.001     RA 3388 (5642) 2426 (1884) 962 0.005     AS 2447 (2261) 1809 (1573) 638 0.001     PsA 2152 (1563) 2897 (3321) −745 0.387     Mixed 3530 (3407) 2249 (1701) 1281 0.012 Prescriptions (excluding TNF-α)     Total 5492 (9876) 2828 (13 332) 2664 <0.001     RA 6914 (10 109) 3183 (15 788) 3731 <0.001     AS 2369 (6719) 2807 (12 982) −438 0.615     PsA 4621 (12 388) 1998 (3237) 2623 0.985     Mixed 5003 (10 245) 1921 (2376) 3082 0.662 Prescriptions (including TNF-α)     Total 27 222 (13 902) 43 707 (14 254) −16 485 <0.001     RA 27 979 (13 418) 43 759 (16 403) −15 780 <0.001     AS 24 561 (13 857) 43 926 (14 772) −19 365 <0.001     PsA 30 223 (15 197) 43 629 (5319) −13 407 <0.001     Mixed 26 271 (14 676) 43 127 (4727) −16 856 <0.001 Service utilization     Total 2475 (8010) 2142 (7216) 333 0.079     RA 3125 (9920) 2142 (6760) 983 0.007     AS 1011 (2478) 2326 (9589) −1315 0.422     PsA 1722 (4572) 1165 (2904) 557 0.925     Mixed 2564 (5732) 2649 (6884) −85 0.117 Hospitalizations     Total 5890 (14 951) 3552 (11 135) 2338 <0.001     RA 6869 (13 868) 4189 (12 930) 2680 <0.001     AS 3051 (7323) 2027 (6708) 1024 0.157     PsA 8862 (31 399) 3466 (11 076) 5396 0.249     Mixed 4252 (10 753) 3429 (8027) 823 0.490 Costs associated with sick leave     Total 1241 (3774) 717 (2784) 524 0.011     RA 1342 (3918) 620 (2852) 722 0.007     AS 997 (3514) 1072 (2982) −75 0.386     PsA 1330 (4525) 594 (1689) 736 0.937     Mixed 1135 (2898) 629 (2844) 506 0.007 Total costs (excluding TNF-α)     Total 18 192 (24 628) 11 558 (20 823) 6634 <0.001     RA 21 637 (25 851) 12 561 (23 801) 9076 <0.001     AS 9875 (12 416) 10 042 (19 240) −167 0.143     PsA 18 687 (36 880) 10 119 (13 312) 8568 0.444     Mixed 16 485 (20 702) 10 877 (12 175) 5608 0.169 Total costs (including TNF-α)     Total 39 922 (25 670) 52 437 (21 521) −12 515 <0.001     RA 42 703 (26 436) 53 138 (24 119) −10 435 <0.001     AS 32 068 (17 211) 51 160 (21 153) −19 092 <0.001     PsA 44 289 (37 175) 51 751 (14 273) −7462 <0.001     Mixed 37 753 (21 575) 52 083 (12 929) −14 330 <0.001 Indication Non-persistent, mean (s.d.), €; Persistent, mean (s.d.), € Cost difference P-value Office-based visits     Total 3094 (4601) 2319 (2021) 775 <0.001     RA 3388 (5642) 2426 (1884) 962 0.005     AS 2447 (2261) 1809 (1573) 638 0.001     PsA 2152 (1563) 2897 (3321) −745 0.387     Mixed 3530 (3407) 2249 (1701) 1281 0.012 Prescriptions (excluding TNF-α)     Total 5492 (9876) 2828 (13 332) 2664 <0.001     RA 6914 (10 109) 3183 (15 788) 3731 <0.001     AS 2369 (6719) 2807 (12 982) −438 0.615     PsA 4621 (12 388) 1998 (3237) 2623 0.985     Mixed 5003 (10 245) 1921 (2376) 3082 0.662 Prescriptions (including TNF-α)     Total 27 222 (13 902) 43 707 (14 254) −16 485 <0.001     RA 27 979 (13 418) 43 759 (16 403) −15 780 <0.001     AS 24 561 (13 857) 43 926 (14 772) −19 365 <0.001     PsA 30 223 (15 197) 43 629 (5319) −13 407 <0.001     Mixed 26 271 (14 676) 43 127 (4727) −16 856 <0.001 Service utilization     Total 2475 (8010) 2142 (7216) 333 0.079     RA 3125 (9920) 2142 (6760) 983 0.007     AS 1011 (2478) 2326 (9589) −1315 0.422     PsA 1722 (4572) 1165 (2904) 557 0.925     Mixed 2564 (5732) 2649 (6884) −85 0.117 Hospitalizations     Total 5890 (14 951) 3552 (11 135) 2338 <0.001     RA 6869 (13 868) 4189 (12 930) 2680 <0.001     AS 3051 (7323) 2027 (6708) 1024 0.157     PsA 8862 (31 399) 3466 (11 076) 5396 0.249     Mixed 4252 (10 753) 3429 (8027) 823 0.490 Costs associated with sick leave     Total 1241 (3774) 717 (2784) 524 0.011     RA 1342 (3918) 620 (2852) 722 0.007     AS 997 (3514) 1072 (2982) −75 0.386     PsA 1330 (4525) 594 (1689) 736 0.937     Mixed 1135 (2898) 629 (2844) 506 0.007 Total costs (excluding TNF-α)     Total 18 192 (24 628) 11 558 (20 823) 6634 <0.001     RA 21 637 (25 851) 12 561 (23 801) 9076 <0.001     AS 9875 (12 416) 10 042 (19 240) −167 0.143     PsA 18 687 (36 880) 10 119 (13 312) 8568 0.444     Mixed 16 485 (20 702) 10 877 (12 175) 5608 0.169 Total costs (including TNF-α)     Total 39 922 (25 670) 52 437 (21 521) −12 515 <0.001     RA 42 703 (26 436) 53 138 (24 119) −10 435 <0.001     AS 32 068 (17 211) 51 160 (21 153) −19 092 <0.001     PsA 44 289 (37 175) 51 751 (14 273) −7462 <0.001     Mixed 37 753 (21 575) 52 083 (12 929) −14 330 <0.001 Table 2 Average costs per patient within 2 years after initiation of s.c. TNFi therapy in persistent and non-persistent patients Indication Non-persistent, mean (s.d.), €; Persistent, mean (s.d.), € Cost difference P-value Office-based visits     Total 3094 (4601) 2319 (2021) 775 <0.001     RA 3388 (5642) 2426 (1884) 962 0.005     AS 2447 (2261) 1809 (1573) 638 0.001     PsA 2152 (1563) 2897 (3321) −745 0.387     Mixed 3530 (3407) 2249 (1701) 1281 0.012 Prescriptions (excluding TNF-α)     Total 5492 (9876) 2828 (13 332) 2664 <0.001     RA 6914 (10 109) 3183 (15 788) 3731 <0.001     AS 2369 (6719) 2807 (12 982) −438 0.615     PsA 4621 (12 388) 1998 (3237) 2623 0.985     Mixed 5003 (10 245) 1921 (2376) 3082 0.662 Prescriptions (including TNF-α)     Total 27 222 (13 902) 43 707 (14 254) −16 485 <0.001     RA 27 979 (13 418) 43 759 (16 403) −15 780 <0.001     AS 24 561 (13 857) 43 926 (14 772) −19 365 <0.001     PsA 30 223 (15 197) 43 629 (5319) −13 407 <0.001     Mixed 26 271 (14 676) 43 127 (4727) −16 856 <0.001 Service utilization     Total 2475 (8010) 2142 (7216) 333 0.079     RA 3125 (9920) 2142 (6760) 983 0.007     AS 1011 (2478) 2326 (9589) −1315 0.422     PsA 1722 (4572) 1165 (2904) 557 0.925     Mixed 2564 (5732) 2649 (6884) −85 0.117 Hospitalizations     Total 5890 (14 951) 3552 (11 135) 2338 <0.001     RA 6869 (13 868) 4189 (12 930) 2680 <0.001     AS 3051 (7323) 2027 (6708) 1024 0.157     PsA 8862 (31 399) 3466 (11 076) 5396 0.249     Mixed 4252 (10 753) 3429 (8027) 823 0.490 Costs associated with sick leave     Total 1241 (3774) 717 (2784) 524 0.011     RA 1342 (3918) 620 (2852) 722 0.007     AS 997 (3514) 1072 (2982) −75 0.386     PsA 1330 (4525) 594 (1689) 736 0.937     Mixed 1135 (2898) 629 (2844) 506 0.007 Total costs (excluding TNF-α)     Total 18 192 (24 628) 11 558 (20 823) 6634 <0.001     RA 21 637 (25 851) 12 561 (23 801) 9076 <0.001     AS 9875 (12 416) 10 042 (19 240) −167 0.143     PsA 18 687 (36 880) 10 119 (13 312) 8568 0.444     Mixed 16 485 (20 702) 10 877 (12 175) 5608 0.169 Total costs (including TNF-α)     Total 39 922 (25 670) 52 437 (21 521) −12 515 <0.001     RA 42 703 (26 436) 53 138 (24 119) −10 435 <0.001     AS 32 068 (17 211) 51 160 (21 153) −19 092 <0.001     PsA 44 289 (37 175) 51 751 (14 273) −7462 <0.001     Mixed 37 753 (21 575) 52 083 (12 929) −14 330 <0.001 Indication Non-persistent, mean (s.d.), €; Persistent, mean (s.d.), € Cost difference P-value Office-based visits     Total 3094 (4601) 2319 (2021) 775 <0.001     RA 3388 (5642) 2426 (1884) 962 0.005     AS 2447 (2261) 1809 (1573) 638 0.001     PsA 2152 (1563) 2897 (3321) −745 0.387     Mixed 3530 (3407) 2249 (1701) 1281 0.012 Prescriptions (excluding TNF-α)     Total 5492 (9876) 2828 (13 332) 2664 <0.001     RA 6914 (10 109) 3183 (15 788) 3731 <0.001     AS 2369 (6719) 2807 (12 982) −438 0.615     PsA 4621 (12 388) 1998 (3237) 2623 0.985     Mixed 5003 (10 245) 1921 (2376) 3082 0.662 Prescriptions (including TNF-α)     Total 27 222 (13 902) 43 707 (14 254) −16 485 <0.001     RA 27 979 (13 418) 43 759 (16 403) −15 780 <0.001     AS 24 561 (13 857) 43 926 (14 772) −19 365 <0.001     PsA 30 223 (15 197) 43 629 (5319) −13 407 <0.001     Mixed 26 271 (14 676) 43 127 (4727) −16 856 <0.001 Service utilization     Total 2475 (8010) 2142 (7216) 333 0.079     RA 3125 (9920) 2142 (6760) 983 0.007     AS 1011 (2478) 2326 (9589) −1315 0.422     PsA 1722 (4572) 1165 (2904) 557 0.925     Mixed 2564 (5732) 2649 (6884) −85 0.117 Hospitalizations     Total 5890 (14 951) 3552 (11 135) 2338 <0.001     RA 6869 (13 868) 4189 (12 930) 2680 <0.001     AS 3051 (7323) 2027 (6708) 1024 0.157     PsA 8862 (31 399) 3466 (11 076) 5396 0.249     Mixed 4252 (10 753) 3429 (8027) 823 0.490 Costs associated with sick leave     Total 1241 (3774) 717 (2784) 524 0.011     RA 1342 (3918) 620 (2852) 722 0.007     AS 997 (3514) 1072 (2982) −75 0.386     PsA 1330 (4525) 594 (1689) 736 0.937     Mixed 1135 (2898) 629 (2844) 506 0.007 Total costs (excluding TNF-α)     Total 18 192 (24 628) 11 558 (20 823) 6634 <0.001     RA 21 637 (25 851) 12 561 (23 801) 9076 <0.001     AS 9875 (12 416) 10 042 (19 240) −167 0.143     PsA 18 687 (36 880) 10 119 (13 312) 8568 0.444     Mixed 16 485 (20 702) 10 877 (12 175) 5608 0.169 Total costs (including TNF-α)     Total 39 922 (25 670) 52 437 (21 521) −12 515 <0.001     RA 42 703 (26 436) 53 138 (24 119) −10 435 <0.001     AS 32 068 (17 211) 51 160 (21 153) −19 092 <0.001     PsA 44 289 (37 175) 51 751 (14 273) −7462 <0.001     Mixed 37 753 (21 575) 52 083 (12 929) −14 330 <0.001 However, as expected, when including the cost of s.c. TNFi prescriptions, the total cost per patient was higher in the persistent cohort than in the non-persistent cohort (Table 2). Discussion This retrospective study of 1356 patients found that the 2-year costs per patient for office-based visits, hospitalizations, co-medications and sick leave costs were higher in patients who discontinued their s.c. TNFi therapy after an average of 9 months compared with patients with at least 24 months of therapy. Moreover, the average duration of hospitalization was longer in non-persistent patients. Since the database used does not include data on symptoms and diagnosis severity, costs can be used as a surrogate parameter for patients’ health status. Evidence regarding the share of patients who continued to do well after discontinuation of anti-TNF therapy is lacking. However, even if only some patients who discontinue s.c. TNFi therapy experience an increase in disease activity, this can result in more physician visits, longer hospitalizations and more days of sick leave. On the one hand, this can be caused by the IMRD symptoms themselves. On the other hand, increased time-averaged disease activity in RA can be associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events [18] as well as a higher probability of developing infections [19]. The difference in non-TNF medication in our study was ∼54%, which is in line with results of Dalen et al. [14] who reported a difference of 56%. Regardless of the diagnosis, but especially in the case of diseases accompanied by pain, better persistence and greater adherence is associated with a considerable reduction in cost. This does not refer to total costs but rather to co-therapy and hospitalizations. Therefore such cost savings provide indirect but clear evidence regarding quality of life. TNFi products are relatively costly and patients with longer treatment durations, that is, better persistence, receive a greater number of prescriptions, which leads to higher treatment costs, while at the same time reducing other costs (co-therapies, hospital, service utilization, sick leave costs). However, longer therapy can achieve an improvement in the quality of life of IMRD patients. Moreover, the value of good persistence can be considered in terms of benefits to all participants in the health care system, including health care providers and payers. Study limitations Each retrospective study is limited by the availability of data in this database. The specific markers or tests of disease severity and the reasons for discontinuation are not recorded in the database. Furthermore, analyses are based on data of the Betriebskrankenkasse insurance fund, which is only one of many insurance funds in Germany, and the patient characteristics of different funds may vary. Moreover, no privately insured patients are included in the analyses. Finally, this study used mean values for costs per patient. However, mean values are highly sensitive to outliers. In this study, service utilization costs in patients with AS were €1011 (s.d. 2478) in non-persistent and €2326 (s.d. 9589) in persistent patients, due to some outliers with very high costs in persistent patients. On the other side, the median costs were higher in non-persistent vs persistent patients (€262 vs €200), showing the role of outliers. The same statistical effect of outliers can be observed in office-based visit costs of patients with PsA. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that persistence with s.c. TNFi treatment can be associated with several cost offsets for IMRD patients, with an improvement in their quality of life. For health care providers and payers, these findings reinforce the value of persistence, given the additional economic burden associated with non-persistent patients. Funding: This study was funded by Merck & Co., Kenilworth, NJ, USA. The sponsor was involved with the writing, study design, analysis and interpretation of data. Disclosure statement: K.Z., K.K., M.H. and S.D. are employees of QuintilesIMS. QuintilesIMS were paid consultants to Merck & Co., Kenilworth, NJ USA, in conjunction with the development of this manuscript. M.F. and H.F. are employees of Team Gesundheit Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsmanagement. S.K. is an employee of Merck & Co., Kenilworth, NJ, USA, and holds stock and options. References 1 Silman AJ , Hochberg MC. Epidemiology of the rheumatic diseases . New York, USA : Oxford University Press , 2001 . 2 Smolen JS , Landewe R , Breedveld FC et al. EULAR recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis with synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs . Ann Rheum Dis 2010 ; 69 : 964 – 75 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 3 Braun J , Berg R , Boehm H et al. 2010 update of the ASAS/EULAR recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis . Ann Rheum Dis 2011 ; 70 : 896 – 904 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 4 Gossec L , Smolen JS , Gaujoux-Viala C et al. European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis with pharmacological therapies . Ann Rheum Dis 2012 ; 71 : 4 – 12 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 5 Stevens SR , Chang TH. History of development of TNF inhibitors . Basel, Switzerland : Springer , 2006 : 9 – 22 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS 6 Maxwell LJ , Zochling J , Boonen A et al. TNF-alpha inhibitors for ankylosing spondylitis . Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2015 ; 4 : CD005468 . 7 Aaltonen KJ , Virkki LM , Malmivaara A et al. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of existing TNF blocking agents in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis . PLoS One 2012 ; 7 : e30275 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 8 Lemos LL , de Oliveira Costa J , Almeida AM et al. Treatment of psoriatic arthritis with anti-TNF agents: a systematic review and meta-analysis of efficacy, effectiveness and safety . Rheumatol Int 2014 ; 34 : 1345 – 60 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 9 Aletaha D , Smolen JS. Effectiveness profiles and dose dependent retention of traditional disease modifying antirheumatic drugs for rheumatoid arthritis. An observational study . J Rheumatol 2002 ; 29 : 1631 – 8 . Google Scholar PubMed 10 Fries JF. Effectiveness and toxicity considerations in outcome directed therapy in rheumatoid arthritis . J Rheumatol Suppl 1996 ; 44 : 102 – 6 . Google Scholar PubMed 11 Pincus T , Marcum SB , Callahan LF. Long-term drug therapy for rheumatoid arthritis in seven rheumatology private practices: II. Second line drugs and prednisone . J Rheumatol 1992 ; 19 : 1885 – 94 . Google Scholar PubMed 12 Emery P , Keystone E , Tony HP et al. IL-6 receptor inhibition with tocilizumab improves treatment outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis refractory to anti-tumour necrosis factor biologicals: results from a 24-week multicentre randomised placebo-controlled trial . Ann Rheum Dis 2008 ; 67 : 1516 – 23 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 13 Salaffi F , Carotti M , Gasparini S , Intorcia M , Grassi W. The health-related quality of life in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis: a comparison with a selected sample of healthy people . Health Qual Life Outcomes 2009 ; 7 : 25 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 14 Dalén J , Svedbom A , Black CM et al. Treatment persistence among patients with immune-mediated rheumatic disease newly treated with subcutaneous TNF-alpha inhibitors and costs associated with non-persistence . Rheumatol Int 2016 ; 36 : 987 – 95 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 15 Dalén J , Svedbom A , Black CM , Kachroo S. Second-line treatment persistence and costs among patients with immune-mediated rheumatic diseases treated with subcutaneous TNF-alpha inhibitors . Rheumatol Int 2017 ; 37 : 2049 – 58 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 16 Svedbom A , Dalén J,M , Black CM , Kachroo S. Persistence and costs with subcutaneous TNF-alpha inhibitors in immune-mediated rheumatic disease stratified by treatment line . Patient Pref Adherence 2017 ; 11 : 95 – 106 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS 17 Friedel H , Delges A , Clouth J , Trautvetter DT. Expenditures of the German statutory health insurance system for patients suffering from acute coronary syndrome and treated with percutaneous coronary intervention . Eur J Health Econ 2010 ; 11 : 449 – 55 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 18 Solomon DH , Reed GW , Kremer JM et al. Disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis and the risk of cardiovascular events . Arthritis Rheumatol 2015 ; 67 : 1449 – 55 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed 19 Au K , Reed G , Curtis JR et al. High disease activity is associated with an increased risk of infection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis . Ann Rheum Dis 2011 ; 70 : 785 – 91 . Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

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RheumatologyOxford University Press

Published: Apr 12, 2018

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