The Composite Spreader Flap

The Composite Spreader Flap Abstract Background The effect of a spreader flap on the keystone area and the upper bony vault depends on the structural strength and cephalic extent of upper lateral cartilages, both of which can be significantly variable among individuals. Objectives The authors present a novel cephalically extended osseocartilaginous composite spreader flap technique that was designed to overcome the limitations of a conventional spreader flap on the keystone area upper bony vault, in patients with cephalically short and structurally weak upper lateral cartilages and thin nasal bones. Methods This study was a retrospective review of the recorded perioperative information to investigate the frequency of the use of the composite spreader flap technique and perioperative parameters that relate to postoperative dorsal deformities. 176 consecutive primary open approach rhinoplasty cases performed by the first author (O. B.) between November 2015 and February 2017 were included in the study. Patient data was obtained from rhinoplasty data sheets, standardized photographs and postoperative physical examinations. Results Of the 176 cases who underwent primary open approach rhinoplasty whose data were reviewed for the purpose of this study, 38 (32 females, 6 males) had dorsal reconstruction with the use of a composite spreader flap. 17 patients had a deviated nose with an asymmetric bony pyramid. In 8 patients, composite spreader flap was used unilaterally. No patients in the composite spreader flap group had a postoperative dorsal deformity or required surgical revision. Conclusions Composite flap preparation extends the reliability and the reach of the spreader flap technique beyond its previous borders. © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aesthetic Surgery Journal Oxford University Press

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
1090-820X
eISSN
1527-330X
D.O.I.
10.1093/asj/sjy122
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Background The effect of a spreader flap on the keystone area and the upper bony vault depends on the structural strength and cephalic extent of upper lateral cartilages, both of which can be significantly variable among individuals. Objectives The authors present a novel cephalically extended osseocartilaginous composite spreader flap technique that was designed to overcome the limitations of a conventional spreader flap on the keystone area upper bony vault, in patients with cephalically short and structurally weak upper lateral cartilages and thin nasal bones. Methods This study was a retrospective review of the recorded perioperative information to investigate the frequency of the use of the composite spreader flap technique and perioperative parameters that relate to postoperative dorsal deformities. 176 consecutive primary open approach rhinoplasty cases performed by the first author (O. B.) between November 2015 and February 2017 were included in the study. Patient data was obtained from rhinoplasty data sheets, standardized photographs and postoperative physical examinations. Results Of the 176 cases who underwent primary open approach rhinoplasty whose data were reviewed for the purpose of this study, 38 (32 females, 6 males) had dorsal reconstruction with the use of a composite spreader flap. 17 patients had a deviated nose with an asymmetric bony pyramid. In 8 patients, composite spreader flap was used unilaterally. No patients in the composite spreader flap group had a postoperative dorsal deformity or required surgical revision. Conclusions Composite flap preparation extends the reliability and the reach of the spreader flap technique beyond its previous borders. © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Aesthetic Surgery JournalOxford University Press

Published: May 19, 2018

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