Survivorship in Adults with Malignant Brain and other Central Nervous System Tumor from 2000-2014

Survivorship in Adults with Malignant Brain and other Central Nervous System Tumor from 2000-2014 Abstract Background The goal of this study was to provide up to date and comprehensive statistics on incidence, survival, and prevalence rates for selected malignant brain and other CNS tumors in adults. Methods The current study used CBTRUS data, provided by CDC, to examine incidence and SEER data to examine survival and prevalence in sixteen distinct malignant brain and other CNS histologies in adults (aged 20 years and older at diagnosis) from 2000-2014 overall and by sex, age group, race, and ethnicity. Results Glioblastoma had the highest incidence (4.40 per 100,000) and prevalence (9.23 per 100,000). Ependymal tumors had the highest 5- and 10-year relative survival (87.8% and 84.5%, respectively), while glioblastoma had the lowest 5- and 10-year relative survival (5.4% and 2.7%, respectively). Females generally had better survival and lower prevalence than males. Younger adults tended to have better survival than older adults, and prevalence varied greatly by age and histology. While survival did not vary significantly by race, White adults had higher prevalence than the other race groups. Hispanics generally had better survival rates and lower prevalence than non-Hispanics. Conclusions Survival varied greatly by age and ethnicity. Prevalence differed by sex, age, race, and ethnicity. survival, prevalence, incidence, brain and CNS tumors, adults © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neuro-Oncology Oxford University Press

Survivorship in Adults with Malignant Brain and other Central Nervous System Tumor from 2000-2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/survivorship-in-adults-with-malignant-brain-and-other-central-nervous-Z3rtQtlCTF
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
1522-8517
eISSN
1523-5866
D.O.I.
10.1093/neuonc/noy090
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Background The goal of this study was to provide up to date and comprehensive statistics on incidence, survival, and prevalence rates for selected malignant brain and other CNS tumors in adults. Methods The current study used CBTRUS data, provided by CDC, to examine incidence and SEER data to examine survival and prevalence in sixteen distinct malignant brain and other CNS histologies in adults (aged 20 years and older at diagnosis) from 2000-2014 overall and by sex, age group, race, and ethnicity. Results Glioblastoma had the highest incidence (4.40 per 100,000) and prevalence (9.23 per 100,000). Ependymal tumors had the highest 5- and 10-year relative survival (87.8% and 84.5%, respectively), while glioblastoma had the lowest 5- and 10-year relative survival (5.4% and 2.7%, respectively). Females generally had better survival and lower prevalence than males. Younger adults tended to have better survival than older adults, and prevalence varied greatly by age and histology. While survival did not vary significantly by race, White adults had higher prevalence than the other race groups. Hispanics generally had better survival rates and lower prevalence than non-Hispanics. Conclusions Survival varied greatly by age and ethnicity. Prevalence differed by sex, age, race, and ethnicity. survival, prevalence, incidence, brain and CNS tumors, adults © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Neuro-OncologyOxford University Press

Published: May 29, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off